Thyroid UK
84,285 members99,300 posts

Help Interpreting Blue Horizon Results

Hi to All,

My wife has now received her emailed results from Blue Horizon. I have her permission to post them here- in the hope that some experienced members may be able to help interpret?

Below are both the results and text summary from Blue Horizon. Many thanks in advance for any help with this.

Kind regards,

Ian

Biochemistry

CRP H 5.90 <5.0 mg/L

Ferritin 29.8 20 - 150 ug/L

Thyroid Function

TSH H 6.15 0.27 - 4.20 mIU/L

T4 Total 79.1 64.5 - 142.0 nmol/L

Free T4 12.80 12 - 22 pmol/L

Free T3 4.46 3.1 - 6.8 pmol/L

Immunology

Anti-Thyroidperoxidase abs H 206.0 <34 kIU/L

Anti-Thyroglobulin Abs H 422 <115 kU/L

Vitamins

Vitamin D (25 OH) L 37 Deficient <25 nmol/L

Insufficient 25 - 50 Consider reducing dose >175

Vitamin B12 260 Deficient <140 pmol/L

Insufficient 140 - 250 Consider reducing dose >725

Serum Folate L 5.47 8.83 - 60.8 nmol/L

Doctor’s Comments

The Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) is elevated. If you are already taking a form of thyroxine, it is possible that that your dose is too low or that you have forgotten to take it on occasion. It may be that an increase in dose is in order - if adjusted it would be sensible to repeat thyroid function (TFT) testing in around 2 months’ time. If you are not taking thyroxine, and this is the first time TSH has been noted to be high, it is possible that 'non-thyroidal illness' or other medication effects are the cause of the elevation. It may be that hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid gland) is about to develop. In these scenarios, it would be advisable to repeat thyroid function tests in 3 months’ time. I would suggest undertaking this repeat test sooner if symptoms develop. The positive thyroid antibody result, however, increases the possibility of your having or ultimately developing autoimmune thyroid disease, such as Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Grave's disease.

A high CRP (C reactive protein) is associated with inflammation (as seen for example with arthritis or infection) from some cause. It is not an exact test, and is nonspecific. Although the rise in your case is marginal, an elevated CRP is not a normal finding and its presence should lead to further investigation to establish the cause. If you are unwell with symptoms suggesting infection or inflammation, please see your usual doctor soon. If you have no symptoms, it would be sensible to repeat this test in around 4-6 weeks’ time as it may just be a temporary rise, and if persistently elevated it would be sensible to discuss this finding with your doctor.

The folate (folic acid) level is low. Folate is one of the B group of vitamins found in green vegetables in particular. The body's reserves of folate, unlike vitamin B12, are low and only sufficient for about four months. Causes of deficiency include reduced intake from the diet or from poor absorption through the gut; increased demand for folate (eg pregnancy) and side effects of some medication (eg methotrexate). Symptoms include fatigue, mild sensation changes and depression. Prolonged lack of folate results in megaloblastic anaemia (in which the red blood cells are characteristically large). Supplementation would be advisable - I advise you to discuss this result with your usual doctor.

There is Vitamin D insufficiency. Vitamin D is manufactured in our skin as a direct result of sunlight exposure. One potential complication of prolonged Vitamin D lack is osteomalacia, a disease which causes severe structural deformities to the skeleton. Lower level Vitamin D deficiency can lead to a number of non-specific symptoms, including possibly chronic fatigue (experts have for many years noted an association between sufferers of chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalitis (CFS or ME) and low blood levels of Vitamin D). It has been estimated that between 50-70% of people living in the northern Europe (where daylight length reduces your chances of receiving adequate sunlight in the winter) are deficient in this vitamin by March each year. Symptoms of vitamin D deficiency include chronic pain, weak bones, frequent infections (recent research has detected an association between vitamin D deficiency and severe pneumonia), depression and fatigue. Supplementation may be beneficial, I suggest you discuss this finding with your usual doctor.

The Vitamin B12 level is borderline insufficient. Although within laboratory guidelines, some experts believe levels of 400-500 are desirable and that levels below this may lead to symptoms. Low Vitamin B12 levels can lead to Pernicious Anaemia (PA), a state of deficiency of the red blood cells in which there is reduced quality and number. Characteristically, the red blood cells are enlarged in this state (if the deficiency is severe and longstanding). Vitamin B12 is commonly found in many foods, particularly meats. Deficiency can develop if intake of the vitamin is reduced or if absorption from the gut is impaired. Poor absorption owing to a deficiency of Intrinsic Factor (IF) is the underlying reason for PA. Vitamin B12 deficiency in the longer run can lead to nervous system disorders - with sensation changes, loss of power or co-ordination, gut disorders and (rarely) dementia or mental illness. Lower level deficiency has been associated with a range of symptoms such as fatigue, memory impairment, irritability, depression and personality changes.

The information sent with this e-mail message is only for the strict use of the intended recipient. In the event that this e-mail message is incomplete in any way, the recipient is kindly requested to contact the sender of this message. It is not permitted to publish copy, circulate and/or disclose any of this information to third parties without the permission of HSHCUK. If you are not the intended recipient of and are in possession of this e-mail message, please notify us immediately, delete the e-mail message from your inbox, and do not use it for any purpose or disclose the contents of this message to third parties, or publish, copy or store this information on an information carrier.

3 Replies
oldestnewest

Ian - was the blood taken under the conditions always advised here ie leaving off meds for 24 hours, overnight fast, and blood taken early morning? It's just that it makes a difference to some of the thyroid tests.

**

TSH H 6.15 0.27 - 4.20 mIU/L

T4 Total 79.1 64.5 - 142.0 nmol/L

Free T4 12.80 12 - 22 pmol/L

Free T3 4.46 3.1 - 6.8 pmol/L

Results show obvious Hypothyroidism with over range TSH and very low FT4. Your wife's body is working hard to push out FT3 and managing a fair amount considering the other results but it's still low.

**

Anti-Thyroidperoxidase abs H 206.0 <34 kIU/L

Anti-Thyroglobulin Abs H 422 <115 kU/L

These high antibodies confirm autoimmune thyroid disease aka Hashimoto's, which is where antibodies attack the thyroid and gradually destroy it. To help reduce the antibodies your wife should adopt a strict gluten free diet. Gluten contains gliadin which is a protein thought to trigger antibody attacks. Supplementing with selenium L-selenomethionine 200mcg daily can also help, as can a suppressed TSH.

**

CRP H 5.90 <5.0 mg/L

Inflammation or infection can cause raised CRP, as can Hashi's I believe.

**

Ferritin 29.8 20 - 150 ug/L

Dire! Ferritin needs to be at least 70 for thyroid hormone to work and T4 to T3 conversion to take place. I suggest that your wife shows this to her GP. Eating liver once a week, 200g maximum, and including lots of iron rich foods in her diet will also help apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/in...

If she is prescribed iron tablets then each one should be taken with 1000mg Vit C to aid absorption and help prevent constipation. Iron should be taken four hours away from any thyroid meds and two hours away from other medication and supplements as it affects their absorption.

**

Vitamin D (25 OH) L 37 Deficient <25 nmol/L

Insufficient 25 - 50 Consider reducing dose >175

This is probably to high for her GP to do anything. It usually has to be less than 25 or 30 for GPs to prescribe D3. I would suggest buying some D3 softgels like these bodykind.com/product/2463-b... and taking 10,000iu daily for 6 weeks then reducing to 5000iy daily. Retest after 3 months. City Assays do a fingerprick blood spot test for £28 vitamindtest.org.uk/index.html

When taking D3 there are important cofactors needed vitamindcouncil.org/about-v...

D3 aids absorption of calcium from food and K2-MK7 directs the calcium to bones and teeth where it is needed and away from arteries and soft tissues where it can be deposited and cause problems. Take D3 four hours away from thyroid meds.

Magnesium helps D3 to work and comes in different forms, choose which would be best and take in the evening as it's calming, four hours away from thyroid meds naturalnews.com/046401_magn...

**

Vitamin B12 260 Deficient <140 pmol/L

Check for signs of B12 Deficiency b12deficiency.info/signs-an...

If any signs, post on the Pernicious Anaemia Society forum for further advice, quoting B12, folate and ferritin results plus any signs of B12 Deficiency.

healthunlocked.com/pasoc

She may only need methylcobalamin sublingual methylcobalamin lozenges

**

Serum Folate L 5.47 8.83 - 60.8 nmol/L

Folate needs to be at least half way through it's range. A B Complex containing 400mcg methylfolate will help raise the level, and should be taken with any form of B12 supplement.

1 like
Reply

PS - sorry, meant to say that with B12 anything under 500 can cause neurological problems, it's best at the top of the range, even 900-1000.

2 likes
Reply

Many, many thanks for this wonderful (and VERY helpful reply)- we are starting to work our way through the information it contains.

Thanks once again,

Kind regards,

Ian

Reply

You may also like...