Test Results from Blue Horizon


CRP 0.20 <5.0 mg/L

Ferritin 72.3 20 - 150 ug/L

Thyroid Function

TSH 1.40 0.27 - 4.20 IU/L

T4 Total 115.0 64.5 - 142.0 nmol/L

Free T4 19.94 12 - 22 pmol/L

Free T3 5.28 3.1 - 6.8 pmol/L


Anti-Thyroidperoxidase abs 10.7 <34 kIU/L

Anti-Thyroglobulin Abs 15.2 <115 kU/L


Vitamin B12 450 Deficient <140 pmol/L

Insufficient 140 - 250

Consider reducing dose >725

Serum Folate L 9.76 10.4 - 42.4 nmol/L

16 Replies

  • So.... Folate us low,

    Moreimportantly, you haven't said how you're feeling and what meds you're taking,

    If you feel good then all of this is fine, if you feel terrible I would get some more folate into you and a vitamin D test.

    What are your symptoms?

  • Thank you for your reply. I feel so weak and can barely walk. I cry a lot. I am taking B12, Gentle Iron (Solgar), I've apparently been taking the wrong type of B12. I've been taking Natural Sources Raw Thyroid Capsules. These are my first blood tests. I'd like to take NDT. I have ordered the right type of B12 from Amazon. Should be here tomorrow. I did order Thyroid plus 12 but I didn't get the Vitamin D or Reverse 3 results. Do they always send them via email, separately as I know those take at least a few weeks. Can I get the NDT without prescription? I need to get this right. I can't take much more of this. Thank you all for any and all help.

  • If you paid for a particular test and didn't get all the results you were expecting you should get in touch with BH as soon as possible just to check there hasn't been a cock-up. They will keep blood for a few days after testing.

    The Thyroid +12 test includes reverse T3. I don't know if it is still true but this test used to be done in the US. The blood was processed in some way first in the UK then sent over. Results took about two weeks. I'm not sure if delays often occur with Vitamin D.

    I've just checked... The turn around time for the thyroid plus 12 test is 2 - 3 weeks. How does that compare to you getting the results you already have?

  • These results I already received were in 2 days time...I've contacted BH and indeed they had not done the Reverse T3 nor the Vitamin D and they have told me it will now be done and it will take 2-3 weeks for results.

  • Ooh, so not diagnosed? Have you done DR Wilson's Adrenal Fatigue questionnaire? Google it, this may be adrenal not thyroid. I would take your temperature every morning as soon as you wake and write it down. If you're consistently cold then it's thyroid. If not, It's probably adrenal. I would drop the quack thyroid supplements, they are clearly not helping and may be clouding the issue, some have green tea or grapeseed extract which could make you feel worse.

    Seriously, do the questionnaire and buy a thermometer, it will only take you a week to work out if it's thyroid, adrenal or both and then you can pursue NDT and or adrenal support or maybe convince the GP to treat you.

    I know it's long and frustrating, but we've all been in very dark places on our journeys. We're here.

  • I have completed Dr. Wilsons's Adrenal Fatigue Questionnaire and I definitely have adrenal problems big time! I am going to take my temperature beginning tomorrow. Can I treat myself or do I need a GP to treat Adrenal gland problems? Thank you Redditch

  • For the most part I feel good. I do have some jitters but I also just started a new med that can cause a jittery feeling, which I found out the hard way is also a symptom of a way out of whack thyroid! Unfortunately for me after I had a crainiotomy 10 years ago to remove a brain tumor I now take more meds than I care to think about. And everything causes some kind of side effect. So I listen to my body carefully.

  • B12 is on the low side, too. It should ideally be well above range. In Japan, the range starts at 600. Very few cases of dementia there.

  • I have just had similar results and feel aweful how are you feeling do you have heart problems

  • I do have a huge amount of sweating and my blood pressure is high and heart racing.

  • I'd expect your homocysteine levels are rather high as a result of low b12 and very low folate. Homocysteine can be checked independently as part of a cardiac risk assessment. Symptoms, which we'd be interested in hearing about, could be similar to those in fibromyalgia (but I think that it's down to individuals' genetics as to how high homocysteine effect us). Part of the solution is to improve your energy production from cells which would be to take a balanced B supplement with the methylated forms of the B vitamins methyl folate and methylcobalamin (B12) as well as php (B6) and nicotinamide (B3). In addition to that, improving gut health can help a lot as it'll increase your body's ability to take up minerals and vitamins. Also, as others have said, it's worth getting Vitamin D tested too especially as we're entering autumn and serum levels should have hit a maximum at this time of year. If they're already on the low side, they'll only get lower unless you start to supplement (which you may already be doing :-) ).

  • Sorry, forget the B3.... it does help with fatigue, BUT it is linked to higher homocysteine levels... it is all a bit confusing even after studying it extensively!!

  • Thank you so much. All advice is so appreciated.

  • I do have Rheumatoid Arthritis as well and have had for about 12 years. I am being treated with Infliximab every 8 weeks via IV at hospital, in fact today. I want out of this wheelchair. I am so shakey and fatigued.

  • I really feel for you. My mum has RA badly too. Autoimmune conditions need a lot more investigation. I'm a fan of Dr Myhill who has done a lot of research which is relevant to me as we have RA, IBS, thyroid and fibro/CFS in the family! The B vitamin supplementation (methyl folate, methylcobalamin and php (B6) would certainly help you plus Magnesium - I've been using Magnesium Malate and it's working well (Magnesium works very well with B6).



  • T3 is the active thyroid hormone which controls the metabolism and therefore the symptoms. Your Free T3 is in the top part of the normal range so you should not have hypothyroid symptoms.

    As you are still having what appear to be hypothyroid symptoms, one possible cause is a genetic condition commonly known as Thyroid Hormone Resistance. It causes hypothyroid symptoms and requires very high T3 levels in the body to overcome the resistance.

    If there are others in your family with health issues this would further support this.

    In general terms low thyroid causes a slow metabolism, which leads to weak muscles and loose ligaments in all areas of the body. This puts extra stress on joints and this combined with slow recovery from damage is a factor in conditions such as Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    A useful check on how your thyroid/body is functioning is to check the basal temperature. It should be used as part of an overall appraisal, where the history of the illness and symptoms are considered as a whole. Where thyroid blood tests are normal, the basal temperature may point clearly to the true diagnosis as there are few causes other than hypothyroidism or thyroid hormone resistance, which produce a consistent low basal temperature. These include malnutrition (or crash dieting), alcoholism and liver failure.

    To do a basal temperature test, it should be done as soon as you wake up and before you get out of bed. In women who are menstruating, their body temperature varies with the cycle; creating errors which can be avoided if the basal temperature is taken on days 2, 3, 4 and 5 of the cycle.

    It doesn't really matter which kind of thermometer you use when doing the basal temperature test, although it is important to be consistent in how you do it.

    1) Note the reading, and do it for several mornings so the results can be averaged out, since they may vary slightly day by day.

    2) If you have taken your temperature under the tongue, the normal temperature is 36.5ºC to 37.2ºC (97.7ºF to 99.0ºF)

    If your temperature is below 36.5ºC (97.7ºF), hypothyroidism/ISTH should be considered if symptoms are present.

    If your temperature is above 37.4ºC (99.2ºF), hyperthyroidism is possible if symptoms are present and if there is no other illness present to cause a fever.

    This test is a guide only as some temperature variations could be due to infection, virus, etc. This test should be used in conjunction with the signs and symptoms.

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