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Anxiety Support
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Severe Generalised Anxiety Disorder

Hello everyone this is my first post. My name is Eddy and I am 73 and live in the UK.

I have suffered with GAD for 15 years on and off. My aymtoms are always in my stomach, butterflies, constant fear, scared, sadness, fear of death. I have been suffering for about 6 moths this time. Have been on all ant-depressantsants available. Just started on mirtazapine 5 days ago. Keeping my fingers crossed). The anxiety starts as soon as I wake up, and it stays with me all day. The funny thing is at about 9pm every evening it goes quite and I feel a little better. Any help would be appreciated.

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Accept the feeling instead of trying to get rid of them. Due to having ALS fears, my symptoms of leg pain and fear had immensely increased and started. I had great fears of dying, felt impending doom, and overall thought everything I wanted from this life would be over. I ended up constantly checking myself to ensure I didn't have ALS, I also kept using the internet to see if my symptoms meant I had ALS, and all I can say is that it was a waste of time. As a result, when I did something other than searching about ALS, I started to have a panic attack because I was scared that ignoring these symptoms was dumb and that I should continue searching about the illness. Luckily, I decided to say no and accept the feeling of panic I got. I gotta admit, I have been feeling so much better ever since. I feel as if my life is coming back, but I still have aches and pains in my legs at times. I know it's nothing major because these issues on my leg started after I kept worrying about my feet being paralyzed in the future, and being sensitive about every tiny pain I felt on them (along with constant focus on legs which makes them feel heavy). If it gets worse, I'll most likely ask my doctor about it just to be safe.

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Welcome, Eddy. I'm in the UK too. I'm so sorry that the anxiety bully has got to you again - but stick around, I know you'll find some great tips here for defeating it once more. Look out for posts from Jeff and Agora particularly - they know the teachings of Claire Weeke's - the mighty power of acceptance. This is what really sends the anxiety bully sloping away in a sulk never to return. It takes time and patience - but you can do it. I'm 49 years young, and still practising myself. Keep in touch!

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Thanks for reply. It's comforting to know there are people out there who know what I go through. Stay well

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Hi Eddy, thank you for sharing, I wish you the best of luck

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Thanks a lot. God bless

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Doctor Claire Weekes wrote in her book 'Self help for your nerves' that the stomach is the organ most sympathetic to anxiety. In other words it is the part of the body that usually plays up when we are stressed.

Medications can bring respite, I'm sure the Mirtzapine will give you relief, but of course it only works for as long as you take it.

Weekes developed a method for full recovery from anxiety disorder no matter how long you have been suffering from it.

The symptoms of anxiety cause the release of fear and stress hormones which tend to sensitise the nervous system. This sensitivity causes more symptoms which cause more fear hormone which causes more symptoms - and so the problem perpetuates itself in a vicious circle.

Weekes believed in curing the cause of your problems rather than the fake symptoms. You can do this by 'accepting' all the symptoms for the time being which is to say you must stop reacting to them with fear. If you can achieve utter acceptance and get on with your life you stop flooding your already over sensitised nerves with more fear hormone - thus giving your nerves time to recover.

I recommend reading the book mentioned above to understand in simple terms what causes anxiety and how the nervous system reacts to it. Then it goes ahead and sets out a road plan for recovery which has helped countless thousands to recover each year since it was first published in the 1960s.

That's right the book was first published 55 years ago - but this doesn't mean it's outmoded it means the Acceptance method has withstood the test of time.

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Thanks mate. Will be going to my local library on Tuesday

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I've just read this book, after reading all the recommendations here and I sincerely thank everyone who pointed me in this direction. Yes, the language is dated but that doesn't matter. I finished the book a few days ago, am trying to take Claire Weekes advice on board and I do think there is improvement in my fear and anxiety. Good luck, Eddyt, I hope the book helps you as much as it seems to be doing for me. I will read it again very soon, to keep re-inforcing the advice.

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You can also buy her cd's ..I listen to them in my car when lm having a rough day...helps tremendously!

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Thanks, Jansblu!

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Eddyt,

thanks for being so honest about what is going on with you. I have worked very hard on, why this kind of thing happens first thing in the morning, at some point in our lives.

I have found that,

There is always a thought that is running in the background that causes it.

We pull that thought up in the morning when we wake up, it causes the symptoms of anxiety, and the feelings take center stage all day. Instead of solving the problem or thought that created it, the slick work of the anxiety bully, stays with you all day, AS THOUGH, the anxiety is the problem.

So you focus on the FEELINGS.............Anxiety is a formidable temptress.

If it goes quiet at 9, what is your routine at that hour that makes you feel safe? Something in your surrounding gives you comfort and assures you that all is well.

With that said, there is great merit in giving Clair Weeks book a read, or listen to her Youtube videos to manage how you feel during the day while you have the jitters.

We have learned that the jitters can not hurt us and you can accept how you feel, for now.

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Thank you for the post. I will take on board your advice. God bless

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this is merely a outpouring of a nervous imbalance distressing but not dangerous and for every setback there will be a comeback.

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I too deal with GAD and know your suffering. One of the activities that helps me is writing, even if only to write “i am safe and ok” 100 times. Writing helps me to get out of my head and come back to the present. The only way around anxiety is through. Claire Weekes book is very helpful.

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Hi Eddyt

I am a GAD sufferer to, I know how you feel. I have the Claire Weekes book and it helps to read and understand that it’s not abnormal to feel this way, you’re not alone. I try exceptionally hard to accept it, there are times when I question it. But get the book, take it all in and try. Everyone here suffers n we can all help each other.

I’m currently away on holiday and am really struggling, but trying to push on through, trying to accept it. I dread each minute but am pushing on through 🤞🏻

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i hear ya buddy. Have the same problem. Your mind is trained to keep going back to those things that bother you. I am on Lexapro but small dosage. I had it really bad several months back GAD and decide to go back on it. I am trying to go with an attitude of I dont care, whatever happens, happens. It does really help. But, you have to view those bad feelings with a bring it on attitude! When you have anxiety attacks, tell yourself that it is something good every time and that you like that feeling and it wlll lose its effectiveness. Does not happen overnight and you will feel less of an impact as time goes by. Its helped me and you need to keep telling yourself that. Your alive, so that is why your feeling it. That is a good thing! Keep positive and find time every day to relax and do relaxing things! Go fishing, watch something funny! Breath deep and often! THe breath is important! You can do it!! Good luck from across the pond! cheers!

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hello Mark, thanks for your post.

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Eddy,

I can relate to lots of what you said. Especially the part that it starts as soon as you wake up, better at the end of the day. Morning anxiety is horrible. For me, it's a profound sense of dread, not sure how I'll get through another very long day. Yes long, when you feel like this all the time. The end of the day, the dread usually lifts, and look forward to the night, hoping I'll be able to turn it all off right? Wondering if you can relate to my thoughts here? Hopefully the mirtazapine works, give it time. We're miles apart, but keep you in my prayers. Take care.

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