Vitamins and minerals: Symptoms - goitre, dry... - Thyroid UK

Thyroid UK
101,178 members115,374 posts

Vitamins and minerals

Symptoms - goitre, dry skin, hair loss, feeling cold, constipation, cold feeling to skin, muscle cramps, heavy cycles, weight gain.

Endo says I have generalised anxiety disorder.

Thank you

FERRITIN 22 (30 - 400 ng/L)

IRON 9.2 (6.0 - 26.0 umol/L)

TRANSFERRIN SATURATION 14 (10 - 30 %)

MCV 77.6 (80 - 98 fL)

MCHC 375 (310 - 350)

MCH 28.1 (28 - 32)

HAEMOGLOBIN ESTIMATION 116 (115 - 150)

RED BLOOD CELL COUNT 4.41 (3.80 - 5.80)

WHITE CELL COUNT 6.12 (4.00 - 11.00)

PLATELETS 241 (150 - 400)

FOLATE 2.3 (2.5 - 19.5 ug/L)

VITAMIN B12 192 (190 - 900 pg/L)

25 OH HYDROXY VITAMIN D2 <6.0

25 OH HYDROXY VITAMIN D3 23.8

TOTAL 25 OH VITAMIN D 23.8

(<25 SEVERE VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY.

25 - 50 VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY

50 - 75 VITAMIN D MAY BE SUBOPTIMAL

>75 ADEQUATE VITAMIN D)

FREE T4 15.2 (12 - 22 pmol/L)

FREE T3 3.8 (3.1 - 6.8 pmol/L)

TPO ANTIBODY 204.5 (<34 IU/mL)

TG ANTIBODY 547.3 (<115 IU/mL)

13 Replies
oldestnewest

What does your GP say about these dire vitamin levels?

See SeasideSusie detailed and excellent vitamin advice to similar case

healthunlocked.com/thyroidu...

So your endo is an idiot. Does he really think these dire vitamin levels are due to anxiety

They are due to being under medicated

Post these on PAS too

You may need B12 injections

healthunlocked.com/pasoc

2 likes
Reply

I am not a doctor, but have learned a great deal from my own experiences. Your iron stores which is called ferreting are low. This definitely effects thyroid function. Try taking floridix herbal iron. Ferritin should be close to 100.

Your vitamin B12 and folate are definitely low. This can make you feel terrible. B12 injections would be the quickest way to feel better. If that's not available try B12 drops in the form of methylcobalamin or a sublingual. You also need a good B multivitamin with converted forms of B vitamins.

Vitamin D is also too low. I would take the equivalent of 10,000 IU but be sure to have your levels retested in six months.

1 like
Reply

Kellie4 And here we have another stupid doctor who knows diddly squat and should be in a different job. It's mind boggling how many posts similar to this we are seeing, with such dire levels being ignored by doctors. I am assuming nothing has been done about them as I asked you to mention if you were supplementing and you haven't.

FERRITIN 22 (30 - 400 ng/L)

For thyroid hormone to work ferritin needs to be at least 70, preferably half way through range. You need an iron supplement, ideally you need an iron infusion so ask for one as it will raise your level within 24-48 hours.

Also you can help raise your level by eating liver regularly, maximum 200g per week due to it's high Vit A content, and including lots of iron rich foods in your diet apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/in...

MCV 77.6 (80 - 98 fL)

MCHC 375 (310 - 350)

MCH 28.1 (28 - 32)

HAEMOGLOBIN ESTIMATION 116 (115 - 150)

These all suggest iron deficiency anaemia. Point this out to your doctor and ask for the appropriate treatment - see NICE Clinical Knowledge Summary for iron deficiency anaemia treatment (which will be very similar to your local area guidelines) cks.nice.org.uk/anaemia-iro...

How should I treat iron deficiency anaemia?

•Address underlying causes as necessary (for example treat menorrhagia or stop nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, if possible).

Treat with oral ferrous sulphate 200 mg tablets two or three times a day.

◦If ferrous sulphate is not tolerated, consider oral ferrous fumarate tablets or ferrous gluconate tablets.

◦Do not wait for investigations to be carried out before prescribing iron supplements.

•If dietary deficiency of iron is thought to be a contributory cause of iron deficiency anaemia, advise the person to maintain an adequate balanced intake of iron-rich foods (for example dark green vegetables, iron-fortified bread, meat, apricots, prunes, and raisins) and consider referral to a dietitian.

• Monitor the person to ensure that there is an adequate response to iron treatment.

Take each iron tablet with 1000mg Vitamin C to aid absorption and help prevent constipaton. Always take iron 4 hours away from thyroid meds and two hours away from other medication and supplements as it will affect absorption.

Ask your doctor why all this has been ignored.

**

FOLATE 2.3 (2.5 - 19.5 ug/L)

VITAMIN B12 192 (190 - 900 pg/L)

You are folate deficient with very low B12. Do you have any signs of B12 deficiency b12deficiency.info/signs-an... You need to post these results on the Pernicious Anaemia Society forum for further advice healthunlocked.com/pasoc along with your ferritin/iron deficiency results and any signs of B12 deficiency you may be experiencing. You probably need testing for Pernicious Anaemia and you may need B12 injections. You will need folic acid prescribing but don't start taking that until any other investigations have been carried out.

Ask your doctor why your folate deficiency has been ignored.

**

TOTAL 25 OH VITAMIN D 23.8

You have severe Vit D deficiency and need loading doses. Point this out to your doctor and ask why it has been ignored.

NICE treatment summary for Vit D deficiency:

cks.nice.org.uk/vitamin-d-d...

Treat for vitamin D deficiency if serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels are less than 30 nmol/L.

For the treatment of vitamin D deficiency, the recommended treatment is based on fixed loading doses of vitamin D (up to a total of about 300,000 international units [IU]) given either as weekly or daily split doses, followed by lifelong maintenance treatment of about 800 IU a day. Higher doses of up to 2000 IU a day, occasionally up to 4000 IU a day, may be used for certain groups of people, for example those with malabsorption disorders. Several treatment regimens are available, including 50,000 IU once a week for 6 weeks (300,000 IU in total), 20,000 IU twice a week for 7 weeks (280,000 IU in total), or 4000 IU daily for 10 weeks (280,000 IU in total)."

Each Health Authority has their own guidelines but they will be very similar. Go and see your GP and ask that he treats you according to the guidelines and prescribes the loading doses, do not accept 800iu D3, it must be the loading doses. Once these have been completed you will need a reduced amount to bring your level up to what's recommended by the Vit D Council - which is 100-150nmol/L - and then you'll need a maintenance dose which may be 2000iu daily, it's trial and error so it's recommended to retest once or twice a year to keep within the recommended range. You can do this with a private fingerprick blood spot test with City Assays vitamindtest.org.uk/

There are important cofactors needed when taking D3

vitamindcouncil.org/about-v...

D3 aids absorption of calcium from food and K2-MK7 directs the calcium to bones and teeth where it is needed and away from arteries and soft tissues where it can be deposited and cause problems.

D3 and K2 are fat soluble so should be taken with the fattiest meal of the day, D3 four hours away from thyroid meds.

Magnesium comes in different forms, check to see which would suit you best and as it's calming it's best taken in the evening, four hours away from thyroid meds

naturalnews.com/046401_magn...

Check out the other cofactors too.

**

You may want to consider how negligent this doctor has been, see a different one, get treatment sorted, then decide whether you want to make a formal complaint for negligence against this one.

2 likes
Reply

1 iron tablet and 800iu vitamin D thanks

Reply

That's not enough. What you need to be taking is in my reply further up.

1 like
Reply

I didn't address you thyroid in my other post because I wanted to go back and look at the numbers. You clearly have an autoimmune issue going on. You need to eliminate wheat and gluten from your diet immediately. There is a book called "The Root Cause " you should get. It goes into great detail about thyroid autoimmunity and diet. Also start on a selenium supplement and a combo thyroid supplement which usually has selenium , zinc and other helpful herbs.

What is the doctor who ran this blood work recommending? The fact that they tested many of these things makes me think that they are quite good.

Reply

Thanks GP hasn't recommended anything, I was hoping because some things are under range she would help me

Reply

Maybe check with your pharmacy and see who in your area prescribes desiccated thyroid hormones. Even if you don't go that route such a practitioner may be more up to speed. Or ask if there are any functional medicine doctors in your area

Reply

Wow, there is something really wrong with that doctor. You must be feeling terrible. Once these things are addressed you will be feeling much better

Reply

Endo says I have generalised anxiety disorder.

I want to punch my screen when I see this - it appears an awful lot on this forum.

From personal experience I can say that any anxiety and depression you suffer from will reduce or disappear completely when you get your vitamins and minerals closer to optimal, and get your thyroid meds increased, and thyroid hormone levels closer to optimal.

When I mention getting thyroid hormone levels closer to optimal I'm talking mainly about your Free T3. It's currently much too low. Despite what so many doctors say, your TSH is irrelevant. Your symptoms and feelings of well-being are dictated mostly by your Free T3, when talking about the thyroid results.

4 likes
Reply

do not tell me, my doctor at first did not even have me prescribed the (blood) thyroid hormone test (despite the obvious symptoms).

He said that i need a psycologist to cure my health problem

Reply

It's all in aid of saving money. As a health service the NHS has just thrown in the towel on lots of things, and should now be called the NFOS - the National Fobbing Off Service.

2 likes
Reply

I have to say that humanbean has hit the nail on the head. Do not accept the opinion of the Endo that you have generalised anxiety disorder. Make sure it is not on your records and if necessary write a letter copied to both GP and Endo to refute the opinion

An Endo is not qualified to make that diagnosis in any case. The NHS would have to send a person to a psychiatrist. This kind of unethical approach disempowers the patient and is designed to prevent you from questioning your treatment. Clearly they do not know how to treat your thyroid condition and do not care about your symptoms. I agree with humanbean from personal experience, once you improve vitamin levels and stabilise thyroid on the right dose of a type of Levothyroxine that suits you, anxiety will vanish.

3 likes
Reply

You may also like...