Aldehydes and thiamine and Candida - Parkinson's Movement

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Aldehydes and thiamine and Candida

LAJ12345
LAJ12345

Are aldehydes depleting your b1? An interesting theory:

outthinkingparkinsons.com/a...

drhoustonanderson.com/sensi...

Candida produces aldehydes, and Candida overgrowth can be caused by steroid injections for hayfever, asthma inhalers etc

“e) Corticosteroids: If you have had a condition like arthritis, asthma, allergic reactions or autoimmune disease that required you to take oral or inhaled corticosteroid, you are at a higher risk for being infected with candida. This is because corticosteroids suppress your immunity. While oral corticosteroids may increase your chance of getting a serious candida infection (invasive candidiasis), inhaled corticosteroids put you at higher risk for getting oral thrush.”

The aldehydes produced by Candida destroy ALDH which is the enzyme that is supposed to mop up the biproduct from dopamine:

“However, the breakdown of dopamine in the system is potentially toxic as it creates a type of "aldehyde" called DOPAL., as a waste product. In a healthy person, however, this toxic by-product of dopamine production is mopped up by an enzyme called "ALDH" which converts DOPAL quickly to less harmful chemicals. In people with Parkinson's Disease, this ALDH enzyme seems to have become inhibited, such that DOPAL is able to build up to toxic levels in the system. In effect, a delicate balance has been broken, so that a process which normally helps us feel good and motivated in itself becomes poisonous. Without sufficient ALDH activity, the production cycle of dopamine therefore creates a build up of toxins, which in turn harm the cells involved in the dopamine cycles, killing, damaging or at least shutting them down. In some sense, we might see this self-shutdown of dopamine producing cells in response to excessive DOPAL not as pathology, but as the body's wisdom, a self-regulation mechanism.”

So does taking l-dopa add to the problem?

Would it be helpful to limit foods containing aldehydes. These include fermented foods such as konbucha, cider vinegar, yogurt etc . Not the usual advice!

drlwilson.com/ARTICLES/ALDE...

“Acetaldehyde induces a deficiency of vitamin B1. Thiamin, or Vitamin B1, is so critical to brain and nerve function it is often called the "nerve vitamin." AH has a very strong tendency to combine with B1, as the work of Herbert Sprince, M.D. (discussed below) has shown. (7)

Unfortunately, in detoxifying AH through combination with it, B1 is destroyed. Moderately severe B1 deficiency in humans leads to a group of symptoms called Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. This syndrome is characterized by mental confusion, poor memory, poor neuromuscular coordination, and visual disturbances. Its primary accepted cause is chronic alcoholism. B1 is also necessary for the production of ATP bioenergy in all body cells including the brain, and the brain must produce and use 20% of the body's energy total, even while asleep.

Vitamin B1 is also essential for production of acetylcholine. Acetylcholine is one of the brain's major neurotransmitters, facilitating optimal memory, mental focus and concentration, and learning. Alzheimer's disease represents a rather extreme case of memory loss and impaired concentration due to destruction of acetylcholine-using brain cells. In a classic experiment reported in 1942, R.R. Williams and colleagues found that even mild B1 deficiency in humans continued over a long period of time (the experiment ran six months) produces symptoms including apathy, confusion, emotional instability, irritability, depression, feelings of impending doom, fatigue, insomnia, and headaches, all symptoms of less-than-optimal brain function.

Foods high in aldehydes include Rejuvelac, apple cider vinegar, and kombucha tea.”

Although this next guy thinks kombucha doesn’t have much aldehyde, but they are produced by the breakdown of alcohol (in a hang over) and sugar and fatty acids in our diet on the way to producing glucose.

westonaprice.org/are-kombuc...

Ways to reduce Acetaldehyde are to consume foods that boost glutathione:

Selenium, vitamin c, sulphur Rich Veges eg cabbage Brussel sprouts, whey protein, spinach, avocado, asparagus, milk thistle , turmeric, sleep and exercise.

healthline.com/nutrition/ho...

4 Replies
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Thanks for this post. I'm looking into possible links between PD and mold/yeast/Candida. This is very useful.

Hope it helps! Thanks for reminding me of it. I seem to go in circles from one theory to another so interesting to revisit an earlier post of mine to remind myself of this.

If you are interested in this topic look into Hardy’s greens and probiotics and their daily essential nutrients. My husband has been taking them for a month now and the difference is amazing to his mood and energy, although he also restarted the restore gold product at the same time which he has tried before with not much effect so it could be a combination of them all.

hardynutritionals.com/products

Wow. Hardy's greens and probiotics look grrreat! Thanks!

I know, the process of researching and understanding Parkinson's is a blessing and a challenge. I read about the possibility of household mold being a PD cause a year or two ago. And it's been in the back of my mind. Now I've revisited it (and did a post yesterday if you want a link to the research). And now I face a challenge: to try to reduce the impact of mold in my life.

A PwP doesn't heal from research alone!

My housemate said her stuff in the basement got moldy-smelling. The research article claims that the neurotoxic chemical is the same chemical that makes the moldy smell! Oh no! My intuition is that I need to get rid of a lot of stuff. (Some things I may be able to reclaim.) But some needs to go I think, and it's a loss. I'm also working on imperfect information. But I feel I'm finally calling myself to take action, and my health is more important than my stuff.

Holy moly! This may be why High Dose Thiamine (B1) therapy works!!!!!

I am referring mainly to what is in the original post above, about aldehydes and B1.

"Acetaldehyde induces a deficiency of vitamin B1. Thiamin, or Vitamin B1, is so critical to brain and nerve function it is often called the "nerve vitamin." AH has a very strong tendency to combine with B1, as the work of Herbert Sprince, M.D. (discussed below) has shown. (7)

"Unfortunately, in detoxifying AH through combination with it, B1 is destroyed. Moderately severe B1 deficiency in humans leads to a group of symptoms called Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. This syndrome is characterized by mental confusion, poor memory, poor neuromuscular coordination, and visual disturbances. Its primary accepted cause is chronic alcoholism. B1 is also necessary for the production of ATP bioenergy in all body cells including the brain, and the brain must produce and use 20% of the body's energy total, even while asleep."

"Vitamin B1 is also essential for production of acetylcholine. Acetylcholine is one of the brain's major neurotransmitters, facilitating optimal memory, mental focus and concentration, and learning. Alzheimer's disease represents a rather extreme case of memory loss and impaired concentration due to destruction of acetylcholine-using brain cells. In a classic experiment reported in 1942, R.R. Williams and colleagues found that even mild B1 deficiency in humans continued over a long period of time (the experiment ran six months) produces symptoms including apathy, confusion, emotional instability, irritability, depression, feelings of impending doom, fatigue, insomnia, and headaches, all symptoms of less-than-optimal brain function."

I think the blood levels of B1 for people with PD are typically normal (??), but maybe it's what goes on in the cells (??).

Anyway, here's another paper which says that the inhibition of enzyme ALDH can lead to broken down dopamine staying as toxic DOPAL instead of being converted to the safe DOPAC.

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

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