To stwdiehl

Apologizing for not replying until now.I've been very poorly with my severe fibro as of late.

No, all studies conclude that the "differerent" PTSD brain, the alteration to the amygdala ie how it behaves when flashback is triggered-sort of "melt down" state, is as such irreversible; but a lot can in time be done to progressively enhance level of functioning and improve life quality.

Reagards, Kirsten(KTRANSC).

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  • Hi, Kirsten, I'm so sorry you're feeling unwell with the fibro. I went through that for 2 excruciating years; it made life so difficult so I can definitely relate.

    Just to add to your note that the science behind PTSD symptoms is changing:

    I've seen studies that conclude that the amygdala actually can regain its normal size, change gray matter density and resume less stress-triggering function in response to recovery and stress reduction techniques.

    I've also interviewed many neuroscientists who concur that the PTSD brain can see enormous healthy, neuroplastic alteration in response to a wide range of therapeutic intervention.

    There's more hope than ever for reversing how trauma affects the brain. :)

  • Hi Michele,

    thanks for your concern.

    Right, that's amazing,it really lends hope for being optimistic about the future.As I understand you, reversing the amygdala back to any kind of recovery state,is dependent upon people getting the appropriate therapies,and being in a supportive environment!?.Will you paste a link or otherwise refer to the research litterature, here?

    Kind regards,Kirsten(KTRANS).

  • Hi Michele,

    thanks for your concern.

    Right, that's amazing,it really lends hope for being optimistic about the future.As I understand you, reversing the amygdala back to any kind of recovery state,is dependent upon people getting the appropriate therapies,and being in a supportive environment!?.Will you paste a link or otherwise refer to the research litterature, here?

    Kind regards,Kirsten(KTRANS).

  • Hi! For example, take a look at this:

    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

    Yes, there has to be some kind of intervention to interrupt the survival mode function and bring the systems and so the amygdala back down to normal functioning.

    Lots of ways to do that. Some ideas covered in the "How Trauma Affects the Brain" webinar series:

    changeyouchoose.com/webinar...

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