The hormone, called betatrophin

The hormone, called betatrophin, causes mice to produce insulin-secreting pancreatic beta cells at up to 30 times the normal rate. The new beta cells only produce insulin when called for by the body, offering the potential for the natural regulation of insulin and a great reduction in the complications associated with diabetes, the leading medical cause of amputations and non-genetic loss of vision.

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  • Data through google search does nor support what healthybloodlevels has written above. I copy paste conclusion I found at NCBI web site: Circulating concentrations of betatrophin are increased in type 1 diabetes in contrast with what was recently described in an insulin-deficient mouse model. However, increased betatrophin concentrations do not protect against loss of C-peptide. Betatrophin treatment in type 1 diabetes would therefore probably not be successful without the use of supraphysiological doses or a combination with immune regulatory treatment.

  • ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

    Vital news for type-1s.

    With type-2 the problem is often not that there is insufficient insulin, in fact frequently there is too much insulin and the body is unable to use it efficiently. Keep your carbohydrate intake between 10 and 14 portions per day (1 portion = 10g carbohydrate), ideally 3 meals x 4 carb portions. Follow this link uk.sitestat.com/diabetes/we...

    Eat low GI carbs, reducing intake of fructose too which glycosylates haemoglobin seven times as much as glucose. Follow this link glycemicindex.com/

    Make up the balance of your meals with natural, additive-free, unprocessed protein (palm-size) and fat foods such as meat, poultry, fish, seafood, eggs, cheese, coconut oil, palm oil (not hydrogenated), olive oil, and butter.

  • Spot on 'Concerned'. A number of our members have experienced negative outcomes with small intake of fructose.

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