W2 R1 and flat feet

O woe is me! To start with 90 seconds is definitely more than 30 seconds extra to last week. It was wearisome to say the least. At times I felt as though I was running on the spot. I'm sure I'll never get to W3. It took 40 minutes before I was breathing normally again after I finished the "run" and before I got home from the park in the car I had turned from very hot into chilled. It wasn't nice.

Then if all that wasn't enough notpheidippides said I'm running flat footed and should be landing on ball of foot at least. I can't see me changing now after 66 years! Perhaps that was why my family always laughed at me when I was a child.

8 Replies

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  • My understanding is it is best to land mid-foot, so it sounds like you're doing great! Try to relax and your body will get you into your natural stride. I know its very difficult to do in the early weeks, but it will help. I went from not running some of my 1 minutes to now running well over an hour. I had the same doubts as you do now. Trust the program, go slow and know you can do this! As you finish each run/week your confidence will build in seeing what you can achieve! Back to the first weeks. I was physically ill after a few of my first runs. As you build stamina, you will find your recovery time also improves. Looking forward to reading about your next run! Gayle

  • Well done you for sticking at it! I slowed down when I was getting tired early on- it really helped x

  • Terrific blog... and don't worry about the footfall suggested on the podcast, I think I too was confused... thinking myself deformed in some way...Nah, just Laura having a joke ...after reading a few blogs on here I soon realised that hardly anyone lands on that part of the foot... continue doing what you've been doing all along, though make sure you take things really slowly and steadily, landing gently almost underneath your body - it'll reduce the likelihood of pains in feet, knees and hips etc. Yes, I know it sounds as if there will be no forward movement at all, but that will come, honestly. I am certain there are a few whose running pace is slower than their walking in the early days! As an asthmatic too, I gasped my way through the first few weeks but have to say that since about week 3 or 4, my use of inhaler has almost ceased! I used it the first time in over a month the other day when the cold wind really chilled everything again. Isn't it good to think our lungs are getting stronger too! Keep on doing what you're doing, smiling as you go and enjoying it all .. that what life over 60 should be about. Good luck, Linda x

  • Thanks for that, Linda,

  • I land with my feet pretty much flat and it works just fine for me - I ran for 47 minutes today (yes, that is a *very* long time!) and my feet and legs felt absolutely fine afterwards. What you really want to avoid is landing on your heels (ie avoid doing what Laura advises on a couple of the podcasts).

    I think maybe the middle of my foot lands first, but I'm sure it would look like my whole foot just slapping down.

    If you're out of breath though, slow down. I'll keep saying it! My 47 min run was 5k, which is 4 mph, a good walking pace, but that's my running! And I've speeded up too! :)

  • I can't go anything else but slow! But I'm grateful for your thoughts and reassurance. I've got two clear days rest now and then sometime Monday I'll be off again. I prefer first thing in the park...only a few dogwalkers who obviously think I'm crazy but smile nontheless!

  • I have very flat feet and had to buy special trainers after springing my ankle badly during week 2. I went to a shop that filmed my stride, and now also wear ankle supports. I strained my ankle partly by trying to land on my heel as Laura suggests. I was concentrating so hard on running in this style I wasn't paying attention to the road.

    I am only at the end of week 5 but I can honestly say the ankle supports and proper trainers have helped me

  • ThanksTeaAye (you must be Scottish?) I too had my gait analysed and my shoes are beautifully comfortable. Take care and good luck with the rest of the course.

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