Long runs v short brusts

A quick question ...do the rest of you find the longer runs easier than the short bursts? i thought looking back on my progress that the way I struggled eariler on runs that this was due to my lack of fitness but over the last few runs i have noticed that I struggle when my running pattern is interupted i'm only on W6R3 so still have a long way to go but would be interested on peoples thoughts

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  • Initially I found the walks a welcome break and a sign during R3 that I was finding the run easier than R1 however I found W6R1 sooooooooo hard after W5R3.

    From fearing I'd never be able to run for 20mins straight I went in to W6 perhaps a little cockily and was brought back to earth with a BANG !!

    Don't get me wrong there are times during the longer runs that I found myself begging for a walking break but was always glad at the end that I'd not taken it !! I still can't believe that I seem to prefer the longer runs although the motivation to get out is not always there !!

    You say youre only on W6R3 but that means you are 2/3's of the way through. Good luck for the few remaining weeks ;-)

  • thanks I hadn't thought of it like that can't wait for my graduated status ...sad woman!

  • Quite a few of us found the return to intervals in Week 6 r1 and r2 after the longer run in Week 5, pretty difficult. In my case this is because I often take 5 minutes or more to get into my stride. Even now, when running longer distances (up to 2 hours) interruptions such as stopping to take a photo, take off/put on a jacket or the occasional toilet break, means having to find my stride again and this delays me stopping for as long as possible.

  • OMG a two hour run how far do you go sending a very impressed hi five :)

  • 16 km. I wrote a wee blog about it:

    couchto5k.healthunlocked.co...

  • I'm like Swanscot, it takes me a while to get into my stride, getting the breathing and legs co-ordinated. The first 5 minutes of a run is the killer, after that and I've settled in the breathing and momentum of the legs just keeps me going. So yes intervals are probably harder because of that. Though strangely enough a quick pause to wait for those dratted cars to pass me so I can cross the road gives me enough time for a quick rest but doesn't affect the running. I've not done the longer times and the longest break in a run was when I had to re-tie my shoelace and I got back into it straight away

  • I also prefer the longer runs, although I've only just graduated, so I'm not doing anything past 30 minutes. It used to take me about 10-15 minutes to 'settle in', but now I find about 5 minutes and I'm starting to get into my pace - I guess that is just as I become a little more experienced.

    I did enjoy the varied pace of the speed podcast earlier this week though, interval training at different jogging beats per minute (if a little slow at times), but I don't want to go back to walk/run unless I'm doing some challenging times/distances. When I did a 30 minute run in one direction and had to mix walk/run back to the car, I didn't enjoy the latter running as much as before, as the tiredness had caught up with me a bit.

    You'll figure out what works best for you and I don't think you have any more split runs, so you should really enjoy the rest of the course, uninterupted :-) Well done for getting so far, keep running!

  • Thanks for the positive comments just had a very good session managed 4k in 25 minutes well i thought it was good my family however said "is that all!" they should remember Im a middle aged over weight plodder who is trying to become a runner - but from the look of me when I walked in the door i looked half dead ! a real redfacewoman!

  • That is an enviously good speed for 4K - keep that up and you should hit your 5 K right on the nose. BIG hi 5 to you gal. I can only dream of doing that speed!!!

    - go to your nearest parkrun website and if they are like my local one they show the times of all the runners - and yours (had you done 5K) would have been very respectable. As for 'trying' to be a runner.....well I think the evidence speaks for itself.

    And as for families - just ignore them - I have a ridiculously athletic husband and son who have no concept of just how much blood sweat tears and sheer bloody agony go into my running because it comes so easily to them.

    From one middle aged overweight very slow plodder to another not so slow 'plodder'

  • thanks that was lovely you made me :) big time - still think i'm only pretending to be a runner but we can disagree on that one! xxx

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