Anxiety to depression: My anxiety is turning... - Anxiety Support

Anxiety Support
44,317 members45,388 posts

Anxiety to depression

Jodi_S
Jodi_S

My anxiety is turning into depression. I have been very weepy all week. Ever since my bp spiked during a massive panic attack, I’m afraid to do anything. I’m scared it will spike again. Even though it came back down and hasn’t been awful since, I’m afraid if I move, it’ll spike. How can I live like this?

22 Replies
oldestnewest

Jodi, I don't know if it's as much depression as it is intense fear. This happened to me the other day. You do know that the b/p is expected to spike when fearful. It's the body's own natural resources taking over to run and get away from danger. The only difference is there is no danger except what we perceive it to be internally.

Once the panic attack is over, it's over. There is no longer a need to protect ourselves from it going up naturally as we move around and do things. The more fear we put into monitoring the b/p the higher it will go. The heart is a muscle and is made to work and move and exercise. It's going to take a little convincing on your part in letting go and start moving. It's your subconscious mind stopping you right now.

Here's just one of the many videos I turn to on YouTube that may help you in redirecting your thoughts and going forward. Right now you are stuck in a frozen position, not a very

comfortable place to be in.

"Training Your Mind to Let Go of Thoughts Meditation/Self Help"

by Suzanne Robichard It's going to be okay Jodi, you are safe. This is anxiety at it's finest playing this mind game on you. You can change this. Believe in that. xx

Jodi_S
Jodi_S
in reply to Agora1

Thank you for that. Really needed that reassurance.

Agora1
Agora1
in reply to Jodi_S

:) xx You know I care

Jodi_S
Jodi_S
in reply to Agora1

I did the meditation you recommended. I really liked it and will refer to it often.

Agora1
Agora1
in reply to Jodi_S

That's great to hear Jodi_S. I get so much comfort from YouTube, it's a matter of finding what works for you and listening to it often. :) xx

Agora1 is right, Jodi. If you HADN'T had a spike in your bp during your panic attack then you truly would have something to worry about: it's perfectly normal for bp to spike when experiencing some nervous trauma. But once it's gone, it's gone: when the panic attack ceases your bp returns to normal. No question about it.

You can prove this to yourself: spend the next half hour moving about, go for a walk in the park...no bp spike see!

Being afraid of things is the problem, specially when what you fear is not going to happen.

If you have another panic attack, don't do anything about it. Don't fight it, just let it run its course, the storm will pass as storms always do: just don't add second fear to the first flash of fear. Panic feeds on fear so accept the panic just for the moment and remember: no death certificate ever had as the cause of death 'Panic attack'. It's important to remember that.

Your body is acting perfectly normally to the stress that causes your anxiety. Everything will be well, you are not in any danger, nothing is threatening you.

Jodi_S
Jodi_S
in reply to Jeff1943

Thank you for the reassurance. I will get through this. I don’t k ow how or when, but I will.

Jeff1943
Jeff1943
in reply to Jodi_S

Jodi_S, you get through it by doing nothing. Fighting it and worrying about it and stressing about it and Googling it don't do any good. Fearing the 'next' attack certainly doesn't do any good either. Those things all put pressure on your sensitive nervous system. Do nothing and there's no pressure. Your nerves have a chance to recover. And when the anxiety yields you stop being depressed about being anxious.

Your blood pressure is fine, maybe like me you were meant to have only one panic attack. No use waiting for the next one that may never come. And if it does, still do nothing, still accept it, you survived the last one and will again if need be. May feel like it but not the end of the world.

Jodi_S
Jodi_S
in reply to Jeff1943

I have had three today. Each one not as bad as the prior one. I have taken your advice and just went with it. One happened after I went into the office to do payroll. I just closed the door and let it happen. I have found today that I feel calmer after the attack subsided than I have in a long time. It does work it’s way back up but I’m not in constant fear today. I’m exhausted from the attacks but I have somewhat of an inner calm. My heart didn’t really even race with the last one.

Jeff1943
Jeff1943
in reply to Jodi_S

That's good Jodi, that inner calm and the reduced strength of the anxiety attacks is good. You're moving in the right direction and don't be put off by the amount of time it takes to be entirely free of them and don't be put off by setbacks, everyone has them.

I know everybody has a self help book you should read but in my opinion if you only read one self help book that book should be 'Self help with your nerves' also titled 'Hope and help for your nerves' by the late great Claire Weekes. She first set out her method for recovery based on Face - Accept - Float - And let time pass. It's a short book and you soon recognise yourself in its pages, it's available new or pre-owned from Amazon and Ebay. But I've probably mentioned her before - she also does recorded talks on YouTube.

Anyway, you're doing fine, just don't fight it, accept it when it comes, show it no fear and it's days are numbered.

Jodi_S
Jodi_S
in reply to Jeff1943

Thank you. I will check out the book.

Maxyz3
Maxyz3
in reply to Jodi_S

I am 68 yr. Old female that used to have panic attacks..i haven't had a panic attack in years but if I did I could handle it because I know it will never hurt me and can float through it also at the end I learned not to fear them after 6 yrs of panic anxiety it stopped because I got positive in my thoughts and. Learned to loose fear. Fear keeps panic going..don't fuel the fire..change your thinking towards it. I got to the point I was so sick of it I used to say to myself " Bring it on"! I got better because I lost the fear of them.i was a negative thinker also a door Matt and people pleaser..loose all of that..I learned I could say no and took control over my life and know what I needed.There is an end to this state believe me...you dont stay that way forever.panic goes away. You need to take 50mg. Of B vitamins 1xdaily. also..they are for the nervous system..most important to take..they helped me 100%.

This sounds similar to how I was a few weeks ago and I also wondered if I was depressed at the time. But, I have to agree with the others who have posted that this is more likely extreme anxiety, preventing you from doing things.

I've had a quick look at some of your other posts and see you suffer from health anxiety which I also do (although my specific health fears are different to yours) and so I know how awful the anxiety can be.

I am mainly here to tell you that this fear you are feeling now can and will pass. Over the years, I have several occasions where I have felt this extreme fear which has made it difficult for me to do almost anything. My anxiety hasn't disappeared completely but it has lessened greatly over the past couple of weeks. I know you feel like you can't do anything but YOU CAN and you should. You are stronger than your anxiety. Remind yourself daily that you are ok and you will get better.

Truthfully, yes, your blood pressure COULD spike but panic attacks are harmless. What you need to remember is even if your blood pressure does spike (which it might not), nothing bad is going to happen, in the same way nothing bad happened during your last panic attack (however unpleasant it felt at the time)

You WILL be ok.

Jodi_S
Jodi_S
in reply to EleanorRose

Thank you so much for your reply. My rational self knows I will make it through and there is light at the end of this awful darkness I am feeling. I forced myself to go to my office so I could pay my staff since it’s payday. My husband, who is a chiropractor is monitoring my bp daily for me. He took my cuff away from me so I wouldn’t obsess. It’s been fine. Slightly elevated but nothing extreme. I should find reassurance in this. He took it about an hour after my attack yesterday and it wasn’t bad so I don’t live in the spikes. I just need to convince my anxious mind that I won’t allow it to play these games. My health issues aren’t even that bad compared to so many things that could be wrong and my heart has remained healthy. I need to tell myself these bp spikes when anxious will not cause damage since I do rebound. It’s just tough right now. Thank you for your kind words. I really appreciate them.

Agora1
Agora1
in reply to Jodi_S

Jodi, sounds like you are in good hands at home. xx

Jodi_S
Jodi_S
in reply to Agora1

I am very blessed with my family and my husband. He jokingly calls me “Velcro “ right now because he’s been my rock. He’s my safe person and I feel at ease when he’s home. I have never been like this before and prided myself in being a strong, independent woman. But I’ve never had a health scare either. He is great and loves me through the attacks. I feel bad because I know this isn’t easy for him either and he doesn’t like seeing me this way. I hope I can find the real me again very soon.

Agora1
Agora1
in reply to Jodi_S

Jodi, it's that strong independent woman who will see you through this. Having the support of family is also a big plus in going forward. Listen to your doctor husband, he knows what's best for you because he loves you. :) The real you is in hiding for the moment but will come back better than ever soon. xx

Jodi_S
Jodi_S
in reply to Agora1

Agora1, your words are very comforting. Thank you again. I’m glad I found this site. It’s nice to know we are not alone in this.

Maxyz3
Maxyz3
in reply to Jodi_S

I got myself in an anxiety state 6yrs ago worrying about my BP..the fear of my numbers kept my no up. I stopped worrying about my no.. not worth worrying about to give one such anxiety..I took on the :So what" attitude. Worry and fear keep fueling the anxiety.

Before I was properly diagnosed with PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) and Panic/Anxiety disorder, I had gone to the emergency doctors at a hospital nearby, as I had a massive head spinning episode during a panic/anxiety attack. It freaked me out and being someone who avoided doctors, I had to go as this felt like it was serious. He took my blood pressure. It was something like 150/90... he said to me that if he had blood pressure like that during a panic attack or anxiety attack, then he would throw a party. He said the body reacts to panic, the heart rate goes up and blood pressure will rise to help cope with a possible flight or fight response. It's all part of our make up and it helped me a lot to cope with the fright of what was happening. I had to have surgery on my knee a year ago and they said my blood pressure shot up to 200/100 something like that.....but that it went down once the anaesthetic kicked in, so they didn't even suggest that it was something I should look into. If it remained high I know they would have sent me to a cardiologist. 


Absolutely nothing dangerous is going on here. Anxiety and Panic is overwhelming and can cause multitudes of symptoms.

- sweating, trembling, shortness of breath, a choking sensation, chest pain, nausea, dizziness, fear of losing your mind, fear of dying, flushing, feeling that danger is nearby, a racing heart (heart palpitations)
.

As your body recovers from its overly stressed state, blood pressure, blood sugar, and the bad cholesterol levels should return to healthy levels.

What you are experiencing is absolutely normal. Your body is reacting to a crisis and is getting ready for action in case you have to RUN !... Nothing dangerous is going on here. 



When we experience an episode like this, and if it's out of the blue, we can become hyper-vigilant and watch for any similar symptoms, and can also avoid similar triggers and just curl up in bed so nothing can happen. Avoidance is the worst thing (been there) and in my case I avoided going upstairs in my house for six months so my heart wouldn't beat faster!. I can look back now after a few years of being ok and laugh, but at the time I thought I could control anything by just avoiding them. I faced them head on and with therapy from a psychologist I'm so free.

My depression was severe unfortunately and I am on medications and my doctor and my Psychologist believes I will be probably for the rest of my life. It’s a family thing, and after three attempts to get off them under supervision, it resulted in three breakdowns, but this is just me. It may not be you.

Breathe breathe breathe.


Calming Breath 
Take a long, slow breath in through your nose, first filling your lower lungs,
then your upper lungs.
Hold your breath to the count of "three."
Exhale slowly through pursed lips, while you relax the muscles in your face, jaw, shoulders, and stomach.

Do this until you feel relief. Can take up to ten minutes ... just give it a try. I often have a nice warm shower which helps me.


If millions of people who have gone through this say that's it's a normal response, surely we can't ALL be wrong.

Jodi_S
Jodi_S
in reply to saturn2k

Thank you so much. Everyone who has responded has been very helpful and reassuring. I don’t feel so alone. Tonight I am exhausted. I am hoping I can get some sleep tonight as I know my body needs it. I am almost positive that if I could rest, this anxiety would loosen its grip, if not just a little.

The thing with anxiety is,to keep yourself busy an not to talk about it so much think of things to keep busy an focus on that. I am 68 years,old an have anxiety most of my life it comes n goes but u got to train your brain n tell yourself it's all in my head it's going to go away u got to let it go. It's not easy it's a ruff battle but u will win in the end u got to fight. Jayke 0524 I am here if u need to talk

You may also like...