Tru and try again: Hello- I’m 55 and I’ve... - No Smoking Day

No Smoking Day

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Tru and try again

Iamworthit
Iamworthit

Hello-

I’m 55 and I’ve been smoking since 1978.

I’ve been quitting since......1998. Currently I’m smoking and I’m starting g another quit.

Even though I have emphysema, I keep going back. I run out of breathe when talking fast and it really isolates me.

I hope there’s still something to gain by quitting. I put on weight when I quit but I don’t lose any by smoking.

My last quit lasted 7 months.

Anyone else out there a serial quitter? I want to get off the hamster wheel

11 Replies
oldestnewest

I slipped at 7 months. Smokedone month and I am now free 13 days. I foun out your brain is the problem. You have to retrain your mind. I say affirmations out loud every half hour. I’m starting to learn meditation which I think will help. It’s a struggle there is no doubt about it. I am 79 and smoked for 60 years. I have to stay strong so that I don’t convince myself what difference does it make at this age.. I don’t believe that anymore and I am going to fight the good fight. This takes work, strength and braver. You can do this. You can be smoke free

Iamworthit
Iamworthit in reply to Roxie80

I feel like that I, like what’s the point and I’m 55. I’m gonna try the affirmations technique. It is truly mental for me as I know I can handle the physical with patches.

Roxie80
Roxie80 in reply to Iamworthit

Glad to hear you will try affirmations. My mind is the culprit with me too. I say mine every hour out loud so my mind is changing my attitude toward smoking. We have to be strong and we can do this. I support you and hope we can encourage each other.

Iamworthit
Iamworthit in reply to Roxie80

Yes definitely. Where are you from?

I’m still smoke free....

Roxie80
Roxie80 in reply to Iamworthit

I live in Omaha Nebraska. How about you? So proud of you for being smoke free

Iamworthit
Iamworthit in reply to Roxie80

Thank you. I live in the Detroit area.

Barndog
Barndog1 Year Smoke Free

Not a serial quitter here... but 2 years ago I couldn't breathe. Smoked for 43 years...4 cartons a monthWent to the clinic and yada,yada,yada, chronic bronchitis, blood work showed something in my lungs and beginning of -COPD. I got on Chantix but developed nausea around month 3 and had to quit. I came here and similar sites all the time snd I also posted signs of encouragement on my fridge. THE HUGEST THING IN MY QUIT WAS ANNOUNCING TO EVERY SINGLE PERSON I KNOW THAT I WAS QUITTING!!! I RECEIVED INCREDIBLE SUPPORT. There were many tears and much frustration but. I will say you can do it. I personally am having a bigger problem with the COVID weight gain!! Good Luck and don't give in!

Barndog
Barndog1 Year Smoke Free

December 12 is 2 years smoke free for me

Lanark
LanarkValued Contributor in reply to Barndog

Happy two years tomorrow. You will never regret doing it. Deciding NOT to be a smoker is a very excellent decision. You are already happier, healthier, wealthier and you smell better. Good on you.

Barndog
Barndog1 Year Smoke Free in reply to Lanark

Thank you so much for the congratulations! I never dreamed that I would succeed. It seems that we have both lived through a lot of difficult losses but our children keep us moving forward. My son has encouraged me all along! From Wisconsin, USA. Take Care.

Lanark
LanarkValued Contributor

You are worth it. If you actually really want to stop smoking it is very easy. Fourteen years ago I completely stopped smoking at the worst time of my life. I loved my cigarettes at the time too! I named a date (for you I would suggest a date as soon as possible - like say - tomorrow). The date I picked would have been the 17th birthday of my nephew. I was deep in grief. He had committed suicide the month before. My nephew's father (my devastated & grieving brother) quietly explained to me that I had a living son (my son was 3 years old) and I needed to be around for him. I picked my nephew's birthday and drew a line. I had been a smoker for nearly quarter of a century. I stepped over that line. My brother told me there were only 2 rules to stick to.

1. Never put a cigarette or tobacco product in your mouth ever again.

2. Never spend as much as 1 penny on cigarettes or tobacco products ever again.

It was easy. I stuck to those rules and have done ever since. No patches. No vaping. No chewing gum. In a couple of weeks I was past the cravings and on the road. Spent the next decade bringing up my young son (he is off an University now) and going hiking, fishing and journeying with my big brother. Gradually the years shaped our grief into something more manageable. Then a few years ago, my dear brother contracted a very aggressive Cancer (it wasn't smoking related). No possible treatment. It was a lightning strike. Very unlucky. It went through him like a forest fire before my eyes. I had thought we would grow old hiking and fishing together as we had all of our lives. That didn't happen. 5 weeks after his diagnosis I buried my brother. He was my best friend. I miss him very much. I don't miss smoking.

If you continue being a smoker it will reduce your life expectancy. It will not kill you in a pleasant, easy, gentle way either. Those around you will have to watch and deal with it. Do NOT hold onto smoking like someone trying desperately to cling on to an old lover. Smoking was never your lover or your friend. It didn't like or love you. It eats away at you. It makes you sick. Just stop. If I could do it - and I am an idiot - ANYONE can do it. I didn't "quit" on anything - I made a decision that I wasn't going to be a smoker any more. Just do it. For yourself. Take your life back. And follow my late brother's 2 Golden Rules. They cannot fail if you stick to them. I wish you well and a happier, healthier, wealthier and longer life.

Stay cool. Be good to yourself. All the best from Scotland. 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿👍😀

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