Tell your loved ones you love them and give one extra big hug and kiss

We all on this site have days where we come on here to rant about something that is effecting us at that time. I know I have felt sorry for myself when in pain and have shared this with you.

But on Tuesday lunchtime we found out that one of my daughters close friends was tragically killed in a car accident she was just 18 years old. Daniella was a dancer and training to be a dance teacher and she along with my daughter helped teach classes on a Saturaday .

This horrible news had made me want to keep my daughters just a little closer and will never let the day go past with out telling them I love them and hugging them when ever I have the chance.

Life is so short and goes passed so quick , so take every chance to tell friends and family how much you love them as we never know if we will lose those that we love far two soon.

On Tuesday two clever, amazing, dancing girls were taken and got there wings. Heaven is getting too full of angels

We might have horrible problems but at least we are still here. I for one will try and make everyday count.

Rest in Peace Daniella ♡♡♡

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7 Replies

  • Morning Caroline, what a very sad story, my heart goes out to those parents,...I tell my son, daughter and 4grandchildren all the time that I love them, I live with my daughter and I tell her daily and my two grandsons that I love them daily even tho they are 19 & 21, I don't think you are ever to old to be told or to say " I love you" and my son and grandaughters I'm texting them all the time, you don't know just what's round the corner do you, gentle hugs to you....Dee xx

  • I read this story in the papers yesterday. I always grieve for lives cut short.



  • I have been a volunteer bereavement supporter for the last 12 years and I am told it's Ok to share this with those needed a little comfort.1. You have the right to experience your own unique grief. No one else will grieve in exactly the same way you do. Don't allow others to tell you what you should or should not be feeling.

    2. You have the right to talk about your grief. Talking about your grief will help you heal. Seek out others who will allow you to talk as much as you want, as often as you want, about your grief.

    3. You have the right to feel a multitude of emotions. Confusion, disorientation, fear, guilt and relief are just a few of the emotions you might feel as part of your grief journey. know that there is no such thing as a "wrong" emotion. Accept all your feelings and find listeners who will do the same.

    4. You have the right to be tolerant of your physical and emotional limits. Your feelings of loss and sadness will probably leave you feeling fatigued. Respect what your body and mind are telling you. Get daily rest. Eat balanced meals. And don't allow others to push you into things you don't feel ready to do.

    5. You have the right to experience grief "attacks." Sometimes, out of nowhere, a powerful surge of grief may overcome you. This can be frightening, but is normal and natural. Find someone who understands and will let you talk it out.

    6. You have the right to make use of ritual. The funeral ritual provides you with the support of caring people. More important, it supportively sees you off on your painful but necessary grief journey. later rituals such as lighting a candle for the person who died, can also be healing touchstones. If others tell you that rituals such as these are silly or unnecessary, don't listen.

    7. You have the right to embrace your spirituality. If faith is a part of your life, express it in ways that seem appropriate to you. Allow yourself to be around people who understand and support your religious beliefs. If you feel angry at God, find someone to talk with who won't be critical of your feelings of hurt and abandonment.

    8. You have the right to search for meaning. You may find yourself asking "Why did he or she die? Why this way? why now?" some of your questions may have answers, but some may not. And watch out for the cliched responses some people may give you. Comments like, "It was God's will" or "Think what you have to be thankful for" are not helpful, and you do not have to accept them.

    9. You have the right to treasure your memories. memories are one of the best legacies that exist after the death of someone loved. You will always remember. Instead of ignoring your memories, find creative ways to embrace them. Write them down.

    10. You have the right to move toward your grief and heal. Reconciling your grief will not happen quickly. Remember grief is a process not an event. Be patient and tolerant with yourself and avoid people who are impatient and intolerant with you. Neither you nor those around you must forget that the death of someone loved changes your life forever.

    11. You have the right to move on with your life. It is your loved one who is dead, not you. You are alive. When you have reached the point where you are ready to move on. Do it! Your loved one would not want you to be alone and in mourning forever. You are not being disrespectful. It is a compliment to a dead spouse that you miss the relationship that is now gone and you want to seek another to replace it. "



  • Hi Caroline. I'm so sorry to hear about your daughter's friend, it's so sad. Like Cookie, I think we're never too old to say or be told we're loved or cuddled. I feel for you and your family and Daniella's family.

    Take care.

    Is xx

  • Saw this in the news, its so sad for the family and friends of theses girl, I can not imagine what they are going through, may God give them comfort. I tell my daughter (16) several times a day how much I love her and how proud I am of her, if she is away we call and txt.

    Take care

    Maz x

  • So sorry to hear about your daughter's friend, Caroline. It's heartbreaking & you're right, it just goes to show we don't know what's around the corner. I'm always telling my two & hubby that I love them, I never let them leave home without saying it.

    Love & Hugs,

    Julie xxx

  • My condolences to your daughters friends family and to your daughter and to your family, my daughters also lost a friend this year she had been unwell from the 28th of December and passed on the 3rd of January she was only 20 she left a baby girl in the care of her parents, part of her lower bowel had died. It seams that heaven wanted more angels. Again my condolences the only thing we can do is be there when they need that shoulder, gentle hugs to all. Sithy

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