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Fertility Network UK
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Looking for some advice about Hydrosalpinx

I've been curious over the last week or so.

I saw my gynae with regards to my hydrosalpinx his 1st step was to put me on another course of antibiotics as some swabs showed a sign of an infection, have another scan, go back in 8 weeks and he said surgery will then be discussed. He said the antibiotics MIGHT get rid of the fluid, but it also might not. Can surgery be perfomed if there is fluid still in the tube? Getting myself in a bit of a flap about things at the moment and trying to process things.

Thanks in advance xxx

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I had one tube removed in 2012 due to hydrosaplinx and then last Dec had my remaining tube clipped as found that my remaining one had it and I wasn't allowed to be referred on the NHS until that procedure was done, one that was removed was really damaged from hydrosplinx and had no choice and that was found after my unsuccessful private cycle,

So I'm guessing if you mean surgery on your tubes with the fluid then yes as i did,

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Thank you! I'm so confused at the moment and have so many things going through my head! Xxx

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Have you had a lap at all yet?

It is all confusing, xx

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No not yet. I've had 2 internal ultrasounds, waiting for a 3rd, back with my gynae at the end of august to discuss surgery. I just want it sorting out though as i'm in a bit of pain xx

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I hope they sort it all out for your sharpish. I'm surprised that they haven't done the lap already only that when I started my journey on my 2nd cycle of ivf that picked the Hydrosplinx up and booked me in for a lap to ever remove or clip my last tube. Maybe yours is treatable like they said but I'm sure I read or was told but can't guarantee it that hydrasplinx isn't treatable :/ xx

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Yeah my gynae said that hydro doesn't always respond to antibiotics or treatment, my last scan showed the fluid had actually increased so my hydro quite clearly isn't responding, but he's slightly worried that i'm still carrying an infection due to the amount of pain i'm describing, and wanted to send me away with another lot of antibiotics just in case as it would also improve my chances of not getting any post surgery infections. He said when i see him next surgery will be the next and only option as even if by a miracle the fluid had cleared my tube would be heavily scarred and theres a chance it could happen again! I guess because were not currently under going any infertility treatment the rush for it to be removed isn't there. Its just very frustrating xxxx

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Very frustrating specially when it's causing you so much pain,

Where on your ivf journey are you,

I'd defiantly recommend getting that sorted first hope they sort it out for you asap so your pain goes xx

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Were currently no where near our ivf journey yet, we'd only been trying 6 months when i got admitted into hospital in excruiating pains, they 1st thought it was my appendix, then when i told them i have pcos they thought it was a cyst that had burst (again) so they did scans and thats when they found the hydrosalpinx in my left tube, and i've been in pain ever since, not as bad though its now managed with lots of pain killers, was then told that my only option to concieve may be ivf. My gynae won't refer me to a gynae who specialises with fertility until after i've had the tube removed, so you can imagine my frustration at the moment. Everything seems to take so long, my dads currently very poorly and all i want is to give him a grandchild of my own, and i just feel times ticking. we'd thought about going privately but just can't afford it at the moment! Xxx

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Hi Nickimidge.Not too sure what you wanted to ask about this condition, so I will cover it as best I can, with apologies if you already know some of it. The condition is called “hydrosalpinx”, which when translated, simply means water in the tube! Fallopian tubes have a natural lubrication in them to allow sperm to swim and the egg to travel down. Occasionally, the end of the tube(s) called “fimbriae” can stick together. This then blocks the “exit” for excess fluid to escape. There is then only one way out for this fluid and that is through the womb end of the tube. Many consultants now believe that this excess of fluid can prevent implantation of a developing embryo Because of this the tubes are often dealt with by removing the tube(s) or clipping them. Your consultant/doctor will explain which option he/she feels would be best for you. Unfortunately, there are no other options for the condition, apart from occasionally an attempt to open the ends, which unfortunately cannot always be guaranteed to work.. A more invasive operation on the tubes – opening up the ends, could also result in a couple of month’s recovery period. I do hope this helps with the explanation, and wish you well with whatever is eventually decided. Diane

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Hi Diane i was curious as to wether the tube has to be free of fluid before the tube is removed or does the tube get removed with the fluid still in it? I got told so much infomation at my appt that i can't remember half of whats been said to me 🙈 xxx

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Hi Nickimidge. I would imagine the fluid would still be in the tube when it was removed, Diane

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Thank you Diane xxx

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