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Majorly confused

bevjane74
bevjane74
17 Replies

Hi there I'm new to the group, and I'm apologising in advance for the long post. Advice is really needed.

I was diagnosed as having non diabetic hypoglycaemia a few month ago, I was given some printed out advice from the GP on that advice it states I am not diabetic I am not borderline diabetic but this illness comes with all the risks of diabetes without having the illness itself. I was concerned about it as I displays nearly all of the symptoms so went to talk to my GP - she informed me that all the diagnosis means is I am borderline diabetic! And now they call borderline diabetes non diabetic hypoglycaemia! Doing my research I discovered with borderline diabetes there are no symptoms and if you carry on the lifestyle you have you're more likely to develop diabetes, where as with non diabetic hypoglycaemia you can actually go into a coma this could happen if you develop a blindness to the symptoms. After a massive discussion with my GP I decided to change surgeries feeling as if my care wasn't being taken seriously! In my new surgery there is a GP who specialises in diabetes so had a telephone appointment with him, to my horror he said exactly the same thing that non diabetic hypoglycaemia is the new wording for borderline diabetes!!

My uppermost fear are the symptoms I get and am terrified of ending in a coma one day, and the medical professionals seem to be down grading what non diabetic hypoglycaemia is, being told borderline diabetes to some people may be just brushed off as nothing to worry about but non diabetic hypoglycaemia is quite serious and I really don't know where to turn for help as I suffer from symptoms and they scare me when they happen but those are ignored by the doctors and I'm simply told to eat a couple of jelly babies where as if its the reactive part of non diabetic hypoglycaemia then I may need a top up of glucose to stop these attacks from happening - I just thought I'd post here to see if there's anywhere I can get some help from and some much needed advice, I'm being sent to a diabetes prevention class to stop me from developing diabetes but I think that would be a waste of time due to the fact I apparently don't have diabetes - hence the title of this post - helppppp pleassssseeeee

And thank you for bearing with me on my very long probably boring post

17 Replies
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StillConcerned

Medical matters need to be sorted with your GP.

It helps if you think of it in terms of your insulin levels rather than your blood glucose levels. What you want is for your blood glucose to remain at a nice constant level. To do this, you don't want spikes in insulin that will keep lowering your blood glucose more than is desirable.

Eating high-glycaemic foods is part of the problem. Having jelly babies will give a quick fix, but exacerbate the problem because the body responds by releasing more insulin.

It's necessary to rethink the way you eat. Find what carbs will deliver slow release energy from the Diogenes database at Diabetes UK, or from glycemicindex.com/about.php

Most people only need half the RDA of carbohydrate, which was arrived at when international advice decided to go low-fat.

Most of our daily energy is derived from natural fat, whether ingested or from body-fat, ideally 1.5:1 monounsaturates to saturates, with only small amounts of EFAs.

Protein should only constitute 10 to 15% of energy intake.

Utilise the information from the ICS-NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme; avoiding diabetes is healthy eating.

As a starter, don't follow the advice to cut fat from meat, nor have lower fat versions of dairy, nor consume baked beans; they all abnormally spike insulin.

Don't eat little and often; everytime we eat it raises insulin levels. It is when we don't eat that insulin levels can lower, facilitating use of the body's reserves.

God bless you!

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bevjane74

Thank you so much for that information I am taking it on board, and yes I have realised lower fat versions of anything does actually make me worse - the thing I should have probably mentioned in my original post is I have Glut1 type epilepsy which again is controlled by glucose levels and to control that I'm supposed to go onto the ketogenic diet which I really worry about that it may have an effect on the non diabetic hypoglycaemia, I wish there was a consultant I could speak to who covers all of this so I can do what is best as I'm being advised to eat little and often from all the medical staff and when I don't I risk seizures too! I am actually a walking medical encyclopedia 🤣 as I said my concern is doing something to help one illness could have a direct effect on the other but maybe following the advice may cover both and I don't know as a diabetic doctor doesn't have knowledge of epilepsy and the same goes for a neurologist too - and I'm sorry if I'm bending your brain I just don't know where to turn for help as it's so complicated 😕

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StillConcerned

Using a keto diet to control epilepsy usually requires strict medical supervision. However, it does appear to have regained favour recently.

If you think of carbohydrate being like turning on the nitrous-oxide switch in a drag car, turning it off prevents the car running at such a high speed. In terms of the brain, minimising carbohydrate appears to prevent the brain burning out by not running at too high a level constantly.

Be cautious. God be with you.

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Praveen55

bevjane74

First of all, please post your blood test report. If you are not on any diabetic medications/insulin it is extremely unlikely that you will go in diabetic coma. However, the blood glucose can drop very low causing dizziness on eating simple carb loaded meal.

Dietary changes will fix your problem and you may avoid diabetes altogether if you follow the low carb lifestyle.

I believe you may have taken OGTT. Can you post the results? Have you taken HbA1c test also?

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bevjane74
bevjane74
in reply to Praveen55

I get blood tests done every year due to being apparently borderline diabetes the last test that was performed was when I was told I had non diabetic hypoglycaemia, the year before that I was told I had glucose intolerance (according to the GP these are all terms used for borderline diabetes, which I think is really wrong) I've never been giving the readings of my tests although last year I was given a copy of my files but not sure what I would be looking for to give you the readings - again thank you so much for your input I'm taking all information on board and hopefully I'll be able to get an appointment to try and iron all this out and get some confirmations 😊

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Praveen55
Praveen55Star
in reply to bevjane74

Thanks. If you want to understand and fix your conditions, it is important to know the relevant numbers. You can always ask the surgery office staff to supply you the latest lab test report. Unless you know your real conditions, how can you conclude something.

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bevjane74
bevjane74
in reply to Praveen55

I'll have a look and confirm this with you when I get my hands on my files and have a look through my blood tests 😊

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ThreeSmiles

Hi bev

You have confused me that’s for sure. ☹️ They say you are borderline diabetic and they are sending you to a diabetes prevention class. To me that makes absolute sense and it seems you are being well looked after?

PS if you feel you need a glucose boost have 4 or 5 tablets of Glucose, such as Dextrose Energy tablets. That was one option I was told about on the X-Pert Diabetes course I was referred to. Perhaps you should go on that course. It is simply set up by your Diabetes Nurse or GP.

Good luck - particularly in finding the solution to stop you worrying!

Miles

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bevjane74

It's not the fact they've said that it's the fact they've since said I have non diabetic hypoglycemia which is quite a serious condition but when I've asked the doctor for advice they've told me all it means is I'm borderline diabetes - but these are two different things and one of them is really serious, both doctors I've spoke to have said it's the new phrase for being borderline diabetic but it's a completely different thing and I don't think doctors should be telling you it's one thing when it's not - and I'm displaying symptoms of non diabetic hypoglycaemia which is being brushed under the carpet by the doctors I'm speaking to

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ThreeSmiles
ThreeSmilesStar
in reply to bevjane74

Ok 😕

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phillippo

“Non-diabetic”, “borderline diabetic”, “latent diabetic”, “unconscious diabetic” (excuse pun) etc etc.?

Get these medics to properly EXPLAIN THEMSELVES!☝️

Type 1 diabetes: an autoimmune disease, no cure, totally insulin dependent, must inject insulin on a daily basis many times...

Type2: non-insulin dependent, reversible, preventable, diet related and can be treated by diet alone.

HYPOGLYCAEMIA?🤔means low blood glucose level!

How low? WHAT IS THE ACTUAL CAUSE?

HIGHLY PAID GPs must give sensible, professional answers to their patients.

Regards

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bevjane74
bevjane74
in reply to phillippo

They say its non diabetic hypoglycaemia which is an illness of which I do have symptoms of, but they're saying this is the new phrase used to describe borderline diabetes - borderline diabetes doesn't present any symptoms and yet non diabetic hypoglycaemia does and those symptoms are serious no-one is explaining anything to me other than a change of lifestyle will stop you becoming diabetic but non diabetic hypoglycaemia doesn't evolve into diabetes it's an illness all of its own but controlled by glucose levels (I think) I just wish someone in the medical profession would explain things to me properly before something serious happens - which I really hope doesn't but you've summed up pretty much how I'm feeling so least I know it's not just me who's wondering all this stuff - thank you

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StillConcerned

I think the term is non-diabetic hyperglycaemia. The cause is insulin-resistance. Years of excessively high insulin levels cause a build-up of excess visceral fat that inhibits the insulin receptors. It's a bit like someone working with a pneumatic drill without protection will become deaf to it.

The ICS-NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme is brilliant for not only avoiding this and diabetes, but many other chronic ill-health conditions.

If you get the opportunity to participate, take it!

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StillConcerned

In a nutshell, everytime we eat we raise insulin levels. The advice to eat little and often has been terrible for us.

All carbohydrate is sugar to our body. There is a high correlation between the glycaemic load (GL) of a food and the insulin stimulated. GL = Gi/100 X available carbohydrate (grams).

Also, removing the fat from meat and dairy, again as we've been advised by PHE, increases the insulin index rating of a food; another negative factor. Wholemilk for instance has a rating of 27 compared to skimmed milk with a rating of 60, whereas their GL and Gi are almost the same. That means that skimmed milk produces way more insulin for the same sugar load; hyperinsulinaemia (high blood-insulin levels) underpins insulin resistance.

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bevjane74

No honestly it's not I don't know if I can post a link but ima gonna try

hormone.org/diseases-and-co...

This is what I've been told I've got

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StillConcerned

My bad, but they are two sides of the same coin. Blood glucose goes low when an excess of insulin removes more blood glucose than is optimal.

Again, what's happening is your body overshoots because the sensors are having difficulty detecting how much insulin is needed.

It is all perfectly manageable. First, avoid high glycaemic foods such as rice, Weetabix, Shredded Wheat, or jacket potatoes.

Eat low Gi carbs such as pasta or fruit loaf, and keep to less than 130g per day.

If you need more energy then, get it from natural fats, the best being monounsaturates such as olives, nuts and avocado.

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phillippo
phillippo
in reply to bevjane74

Hi,

Thanks for the link.

Very useful and informative👏.

Confusing “non-diabetic hypoglycaemia” with “borderline diabetes” by medics is unacceptable and shows ignorance.

Borderline diabetes is usually used for those people who are on the threshold/borderline of developing full blown type 2 diabetes due to poor lifestyle choices: poor diet, very low exercise levels etc.

Current research (large international studies) have shown that type 2 diabetes, a non autoimmune disorder can be prevented and reversed without the need for antidiabetic drugs with healthy lifestyle choices, prevention of obesity, regular exercise etc

Regards

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