Couch to 5K
62,136 members94,877 posts

Gait analysis

So I’m halfway through week 4 and would like to become either a regular 5km runner or try and get to 10km. Which means I need some decent trainers. Local running shops off gait analysis and trainer with prices starting at £120 which for a hobby is a little steep. I know I’m flat footed, left leg dominant and heavy landing (what a catch).... so does anyone have suggestions on places to go to get decent advise without being hauled across the coals on prices.... or even better decent trainers for my flat footed mess!!!

Many thanks...!!

10 Replies
oldestnewest

If you have a close look at the offerings of a specialist "running shoe" manufacturer and look at the shoes that they sell to the public - you will see that they offer expensive running shoes and other identical looking shoes at half the price . If you ask anybody what is the difference between the two sets of shoes, you won't get an answer - even from Nike!!!! , except for maybe "Oh these ones are better - they are for running" There is a lot of marketing going on in this industry - do not get sucked too deeply into it when you hear people talking about "pronation" and "gait analysis" , etc.

Reply

There is a post about shoes which includes a link to a post about gait analysis. healthunlocked.com/couchto5...……………..which-shoes

You pays yer money and takes yer choice.

Good shoes are cheaper than a physio.

3 likes
Reply

Take the great advice form IannodaTruffe :) Well done you!

1 like
Reply

If you look at studies, buying shoes recommended through gait analysis has zero correlation with decreasing injury. The ONLY thing (when it comes to shoe shopping) that has a proven correlation is that shoes that are COMFY lead to less injury. Seriously. Crazy, huh? Still, gait analysis might be fun... just be sure the sales people don't push you to shoes they consider "right" if they do not feel comfortable to you. xo

2 likes
Reply

My shoes were gloriously comfy. Unfortunately my gait means I overpronate - my foot rolls inwards. This was diagnosed by a physiotherapist, along with a meniscal tear which may require surgery. I might not be in this position if I had listened more carefully the advice given from mentors on this site. Gait analysis has nothing to do with the expense of the shoes, its about the type of shoe you should be looking for

1 like
Reply

Fwiw - I consulted a specialist running shop and they were remarkably candid. Their advice was that basic running shoes (£50 or so) are prob ok up to 5k at steady pace. More expensive options offer greater support, cushioning and response for longer distances and more competitive pace.

It may have been a very subtle sales pitch - as I left with expensive option. Have not regretted them since though...

1 like
Reply

Good independent running shops usually offer older models (last seasons colours) at sale prices.

2 likes
Reply

I went to Decathlon and got some reasonably priced comfy shoes. They do gait analysis.

Reply

When it comes to gait analysis there are many who believe it is a neccessity to running and those who don't .Those who have had gait analysis tend to swear by it. I have never had it - YET -, but maybe I happen to be lucky enough to be a neutral pronator (whatever that is).

Personally I would generally subscribe more to Henriette2013's comment on going for comfy trainers. Espacially for short 5k runners. Gait analysis tends to coincide with the purchase of a new pair of trainers anyway, which may go some way to explaining the instant improvement people feel.

However, as I am now running greater distances, I feel that it may be worth getting it done. My local store offers this service and is also owned and run by two former professional triathletes so I think I will be assessed by people with considerable knowledge - rather than a shop assistant who has sat an online course.

As others have said, its your money, its your choice. However, before you commit, have a look at this, as gait analysis is not regulated and different outlets will have different competencies: runnersconnect.net/running-...

Reply

I had gait analysis before I started c25k mainly because I wanted comfy and supportive shoes. I'm an over pronator and my days spent in cheap work boots don't help.

My Brooks shoes were £100 all in and I took up a fair amount of their time. I went with a budget of 75 so wasn't too put out. My guy had real knowledge and is a dedicated runner himself. The shoes are a fab fit and feel fantastic.

I've since been back with new work boots to have them fit proper supportive insoles to them which cost twice as much as the boots (but will last 6 times longer).

I really believe you have to look after both your teeth and feet whilst you can.

Reply

You may also like...