Progress Report (w2r2)

My c25k journey is still in the early stages but I have already learned a lot.

On the positive side, I have to say I have found the runs, so far, to be quite easy. I really haven't broken sweat or been out of breath.

On the flip side, I have encountered some issues/niggles a few hours after runs. After w1r2, I had shin splints (which haven't returned since) and following w2r1, I had some pain on the inside of both knees which lasted for a good 24 hours. During that run (w2r1), I felt a slight jarring of my left knee on every footfall.

Today (w2r2), I really focused on slowing down my pace by shortening my stride and reducing cadence as well as flattening my stride (before there was a bit of a bounding). I have to say that this running style doesn't feel very natural but today's run was good (no jarring of the knee) and I will probably be very thankful of the slower pace when it comes to the longer runs next week (and beyond).

Just wanted to add a quick thanks to all of the experienced runners who hang around in this forum and give us beginners their advice and encouragement. It really is appreciated. :)

12 Replies

  • Good to hear you're happy about your progress! I found that from about week 3 or 4, my legs began to feel very different. To begin with, running/jogging felt awkward, especially at the start of runs, when they felt stiff and uncomfortablle. Maybe the same will happen to you. I assume you've got decent running shoes, and had your gait checked out?

  • I hope that is the case with me too. At the moment, I do feel quite awkward but part of that might just be procastination/paranoia of not having done a few consecutive runs without having some issue/niggle afterwards.

    I do have decent shoes, yes but will forego any gait analysis for the time being. If problems persist or worsen, I will certainly have it done.

    I see you are on to week 7. 25 minutes of solid running still feels a long, long way away to me. Good stuff.

  • Gait analysis is really the way to go if you're having shin/knee problems... it's usually free in good sports shops.

  • I've been amazed at how rapidly you improve as you go through the sessions. The 20 minute run at the end of week 5 was the one that seemed the biggest step up, but it was also the biggest high when I did it! My first run of week 7 was the hardest so far, but as you probably saw, I think I probably let my enthusiasm for progressing get the better of me, and I overdid it. My legs really ached last night, but are fairly good again today, and I'm looking forward to the run tomorrow.

    I had niggles, too, come to think of it - runner's bum, and a painful foot (although not when running) - the plantar ligament really hurting on the left instep. The foot has mainly cleared up now (I think it was tight calves that were causing it, and they've improved).

    Before I started, I went to a specialist running shoe shop and had my gait analysed - it showed my ankles were turning in as I ran, and I got supportive shoes, which I think has helped a lot.

    Looking at your run, you really are running a lot faster than me!

  • I seem to be running a lot faster than most people but quite honestly, I don't think I can run much slower than I did today. I have even thought about going to my local gym just to see what happens if I set a treadmill on a lower speed.

    There is a specialist running shop in Tunbridge Wells that appears to have a very good reputation. They charge £25 for GA but waive that if you make a purchase of shoes from them within a month. As mentioned I will certainly do that if these issues persist but for the moment, I m hoping that these niggles are just a result of my legs being asked to do things that they haven't for a long time.

  • Shortening your stride is a good idea. Your footfall should happen below your body, not way out in front, or you will be jarring your legs way more than necessary and likely cause discomfort or even injury. To maintain speed, with the shorter stride you should increase your cadence, not reduce it. Try to analyse your footfall. Without getting hung up on it, it is generally recommended that you should try to land mid foot, or forward from there. Heel strike is considered to be the most jarring. You will probably be able to find someone on the net (or even this forum!!) who contradicts this, as it is a contentious area.

    The aches and pains can be eased hugely by stretching and you will probably find that most disappear after a few weeks, but take note and action if anything persists.

    Good luck.

  • Thanks for that.

    As mentioned, I am actually trying to slow down my pace thus the reduced cadence. I have been consistently advised to slow down, I am sure wisely. Garmin tells me that my running today averaged 6m18sec per Km (9.5Kph) which is a good bit slower than before.

    I am doing my best not to get hung up on my running motion but because it feels very unnatural, it is difficult not to become it a bit obsessed by the little things.

    Thanks for the link to the stretches. I have been doing calf, thigh and hamstring stretches after each run but will do that full range from here.

    Thanks again.

  • Cant really add to anything from the above, I just want to say keep going Dun, youre doing great and all the best to you as you go onwards ....

    Good Luck ! :-) xxx

  • If you do what laura says and don't overstride or bob up and down, jog slowly with light steps you'll be fine

    Have fun

  • Thanks miss W.

  • Pay particular attention to running down hills. I think it's pretty easy to get carried away and slap your feet down and jar the joints. Hopefully the aches are just you getting used to the program.

  • Thanks for that. I have been avoiding significant hills so far (up or down).

    Left knee is better than it was after previous run but my right knee has decided it wants to get in on the act! At this stage, I am fairly confident that it is just a case of my legs getting used to it.

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