Can't get passed 10km

So I have been trying to get passed 10km without any joy, only just managed 10km today. I just don't know what's wrong with me.maybe I am like those vans scan only go as far as 10km.

Then to top it off my race for November is closed, been asking my partner to sign us up as I have technical issues and he put it off and put it off and now the race is full. Really annoyed. Well maybe it's a good thing! I can't think why it might be a good thing as I was looking forward to it. So I feel like a child that has been told they can't go to party.

18 Replies

  • Maybe it's a sign that you just need to consolidate at where you've got to for a bit..? 10k is nothing to be sniffed at! Maybe just try & increase speed within 10k runs for a bit before upping the distance again? It must be terribly disappointing but I always hold by 'everything happens for a reason'. Maybe once you've had time to take stock those reasons will become clearer. You sound like you're doing great to me, just listen to your body & don't push too fast too soon & you will get there xxx

  • Thank you - Yeah I have done a few 10km runs, maybe I will stick with it for a bit longer until it feels more comfortable.

  • It really depends on exactly what you mean by "can't get past 10K'. You sound a bit like me , just a few days ago. I "struggled" to do 10K -- but only last month I "easily" did 15K several times . What was the difference?? Well, the 15K "runs" were done using run/walk whereas my effort at 10K was non-stop running.

  • I just don't feel like I can run any further, it's just feels like there is a barrier. Maybe it's psychological. Hard to explain as I am not exhausted or out of puff I just can't go on. I shall stick with 10km and then try a plan me thinks. 15km is amazing and so far!

  • I am currently doing some bodyweight exercises. These exercises all have about 4 variations - from easiest to hardest. The way in which they are done is that you do a harder exercise a number of times until you can do no more - you then have a short rest and continue to do a smaller number of an easier version of the exercise. The bottom line is that you are able to do more exercise than if you just attempted the hardest of them all and stopped when exhausted.

    As I said in my post above , it was much easier for me to "run" 15k using a run/walk strategy that it is to run only 10K non-stop ( and faster !!! :) )

  • nothing wrong with you...find a plan of where you want to aim to get to, and then train, and it will happen....sorry about your race...

  • Thank you I hadn't thought of that I was just planning on increasing one run by 1km at a time. So I might stick with 10km for a bit longer to get use to it then try a plan.

  • You can get past 10 k but not just yet. Just keep plugging away and you'll do it

  • Thank you I will do, onwards and upwards

  • I would recommend not looking at your tracking device while running. Just set a route and go for it without thinking about distance. Keep your pace nice and slow and consistent. Like the whole C25k programme, increasing your distance does have some mental hurdles to overcome, and if you can "only just manage" 10k now, congratulate yourself and just believe that you are going to exceed it. You will. Good luck.

  • That is good advice, sometimes the garmin can make a run harder, I have run how far? How long? Is it broken

  • I think it's fairly common to have certain distance-barriers. We get so focused on reaching some "magic" distance, so that when we get to it, we don't know how to get any further. Or at least we think we don't know. It probably doesn't sound like much of advice, but just keep plodding on. The 10k will slowly become "easier" and "easier" (as if this running stuff ever gets easy!), and before you know it, without thinking about it, you'll be going further than you ever thought imaginable.

    Sorry to hear about the race. That sucks big time, but hopefully you can still get out there and train. Maybe run the race distance the day before everybody else and then go home with the smug feeling of having beaten them all ;-)

  • Also, try forgetting all about distance and focus on time on your feet. If you are currently running for an hour and ten minutes, say, try and build that to an hour twenty, then an hour and a half. Adapt your pace to fit. Once you have been running 90 mins comfortably for a month, have a look at how much distance you have covered.

  • Yeah I might try that and just run and then see how far I have got once home.

  • Thank you

  • Some fine advice on here Vix. All I would add is that what helped me when I was trying to build up my distances (before injury) was to think in metres. So after I'd run 5k I thought, "well I can manage another 100m." And when I'd run that I thought "I can do another 100m" and so on until I'd done and extra 0.5k. The next week, I knew I could do 5.5k, so I used the same technique to get up to 6k. I then consolidated that for a few runs, before continued adding on bunches of 100m. Don't know if this will work for you too but, if all else fails, you could give it a go. Good luck m'dear x

  • Everyone is great, thank you I might try that too, going to try all suggestions and see which work the best to get me past 10km.

  • Vixchile, sorry about the race, how frustrating indeed.

    But about not passing 10K., I wouldn't beat yourself. What's wrong? I think your body isn't ready for it.

    YOu know wher you start running, you run more slowly and only increase after a while.

    I thik this is the same process, you may hav to run up to 10 K for some while. Be gentle and listen to your body.

    It took me 6 months when I started the gym in 2003 to get from walking at 2.5 km/H for 2 minutes! I was exhausted and out of breath, as I have bronchiectasis. Now I really enjoy the gym and go 3 times a week. It takes some time, don't be impatient.

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