Bradycardia and Sleep Apnea

Bradycardia and Sleep Apnea

This afternoon when I went to a short nap while feeling fatigued and my heart was very slow around 50 bpm, shortly the heart rate alarm woke me up as my heart rate drooped to 45 bpm within a few minutes after I drifted to sleep.

This happens to me everyday since 4 years now. I tried CPAP but it didn't help, apparently it is not an obstructive apnea where CPCP can help.

I have a secondary hypothyroid where my pituitary is not producing enough TSH. TSH is alomst alwyas supprsed.

I take Levothyroxine 100 mcg and felt better when I started it last year but still face this issue. My current T4 is 19.6 (N 10-28). TSH is 0.015 (N 0.46-4.668)

I supplemnt wiht Vit D, I think it plays a role ...

I really appreciate any comment or suggestion.

Thanks

13 Replies

oldestnewest
  • My gut feeling is that you're undermedicated - the range for your FT4 result would suggest there's room for improvement. Do you have an FT3 result? That would provide a better clue...

  • Hi Jazzw,

    I tried to increase the dose and my T4 reached 24 or so but I didn't feel better. My doctor refused to do T3 anymore, it was in normal range and moves with T4.

  • Well that's not necessarily true - that T3 moves with T4. It should - but when it doesn't, a hypothyroid person won't feel well no matter how high their FT4 is. I would highly recommend getting FT3 tested. It's the only way of finding out you have conversion problems.

  • He used to do it before I will insist on T3 test next time.

  • it is a free t3 that you would ask for. Cortisol and igf-1 as well. Have you had assessment of other pituitary hormones.

  • looks like you are not converting the t4 to t3. You also may have other missing pituitary hormones affecting growth hormone and cortisol..

  • Ali1101, I thought I saw that you had Hashimoto's. Hashimoto's is an autoimmune disorder, sleep disorders are associated with autoimmune disease, arrhythmias have a link to autoimmune disease. Are you on an autoimmune diet?

    Back to the question. I started on T4 just fine, for about 14 months. Then I felt like I had fallen into quicksand. I could hardly move. Eventually I persuaded my gp to send me to an Endo. He I persuaded to prescribe me T3 and my world opened up again. Have a look at this link nahypothyroidism.org/thyroi... perhaps you can use it to enlighten your doctor. It may also explain to you why your TSH is suppressed.

    If you are taking vitamin D is it D3 and are you taking vitamin k2 to ensure that your bones are not stripped of calcium? Are all your other minerals and vitamins in order? livestrong.com/article/2716...

    Good luck

  • Don't forget the Magnesium too if you are taking D, as you will become calcified without it (Same goes for K2 as linlow mentioned above)!

    Also, you must make sure if you are taking D, you take extra Vitamin A, the ratio should be 10 times more A than D.

    'Vitamin D and vitamin A

    Besides its delicate interactions with calcium and vitamin K, vitamin D also relates to vitamin A in our bodies.

    The term “vitamin A” refers to another group of fat-soluble compounds which aid growth and development, reproduction, immune system function, eyesight, skin health, and gene expression.

    Because fat-soluble vitamins can be stored in the body, they can reach toxic levels.

    And here’s something interesting: It turns out that vitamin A can prevent vitamin D toxicity, and vice versa.

    What this means is that if you’re deficient in vitamin A, high doses of vitamin D could cause problems.

    And the lower your vitamin A status, the more toxic excess vitamin D becomes.

    Meanwhile, some studies suggest that increasing vitamin A can reduce the calcium buildup that tends to go along with higher levels of vitamin D.'

    precisionnutrition.com/stop...

    Rethinking Vitamin D With Morley Robbins: (Scroll down to: 13:48 Vitamin A and Hormone D Ratio) liveto110.com/transcript-10...

  • How did you find this out. I need the vitamin d and take k1 and k2 and magnesium but did not know about vit A. Very interesting.

    Kate.

  • From 'Magnesium Man' Morley Robbins (Link above) :)

  • A heart rate less than 50 would indicate that you are still very hypothyroid.

    T3 is the active thyroid hormone which controls the metabolism and therefore the symptoms. Without a free T3 result it is very difficult to know what is going on.

  • I hope the doctor will lessen to me and do T3 next time. I tried to increase my dose of T4 but didn't help, maybe I should try T3.

  • If the doctor will not help you could consider private testing - details on the Thyroid UK website.

You may also like...