Now I AM excited......Thank Fog its still Friday have a positive "therapy research" to share...Lipids Anyone... .;-) xxx

Now I AM excited......Thank Fog its still Friday have a positive "therapy research" to share...Lipids Anyone... .;-) xxx

Maybe some of you have known about this, I dont know but its a first for me AND I AM EXCITED ( if you can be excited whilst sitting.. I really want to jump up and down..lol).

I have spent the day on and off researching and alone with my thoughts trying to make sense and find a pattern... Today a breakthrough I cannot believe I only just found it but I am thankful... There is Hope...Ive always felt that I needed to be in repair mode that something was stuck or blocked or damaged in some way that was causing pain and zapping my energy... and after reading and the fact that I had mycoplasma in my lungs 17 years ago... this has struck a chord with me.. and connected some dots... So please do read and would love to hear your thoughts...

Gosh I have butterflies... it may have a long way to go but Im sure thankful for today...

Bless you all.

xxx

Links below for information.. or scroll down to a study in brief I have copied and paste in the comments section...

immed.org/publications/Nico...

Also...

nleducation.co.uk/resources...

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  • In Brief.... Sample below..

    Chronic Fatigue Illnesses

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Prof. Garth L. Nicolson

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia Syndrome and Other Fatigue Conditions

    Chronic fatigue is reported by 20% of all patients seeking medical care and is considered as a nonspecific sign that is associated with many well known medical conditions. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME), and Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) patients suffer from complex overlapping signs and symptoms. (see 'Signs/Symptoms' Questions, above) CFS is primarily characterized by persisting or relapsing fatigue without previous history of comparable symptoms that does not resolve with rest. In these patients other clinical conditions are absent that can explain the signs and symptoms such as malignancies or autoimmune diseases. In contrast, FMS patients have overall muscle pain, tenderness, and weakness as primary complaints, but they have most if not all of the commonly found signs and symptoms for CFS. We previously proposed that CFS/ME patients might be suffering from chronic infections that can cause, in part, their complex signs and symptoms. For example, systemic mycoplasmal infections can cause chronic fatigue, muscle pain and a variety of additional signs and symptoms, some of which are related to dysfunctional immune responses and in extreme cases autoimmune-like disorders. Some mycoplasmas can invade virtually every human tissue and can compromise the immune system, permitting opportunistic infections by other bacteria, viruses, fungi and yeast. When mycoplasmas exit certain cells, such as synovial cells, nerve cells, among others that can be infected, they can stimulate autoimmune response. Our recently published studies demonstrated a possible link between mycoplasmal infections and CFS and FMS, since we found high frequencies of mycoplasmal infections in these patients. Previously we examined patients with chronic illnesses for the presence of mycoplasmal infections. We found that about one half of patients with Gulf War Illness and two third of patients with CFS/ME and FMS were positive for mycoplasmal infections in their blood. The Gulf War Veterans suffer from signs and symptoms similar to patients diagnosed with CFS and FMS. They can be treated using antibiotics effective against mycoplasmal infections, and once they recover, their blood is no longer positive for the presence of mycoplasmal infections. Our recent results indicate that Rheumatoid Arthritis is also associated with mycoplasmal infections. (see 'Autoimmune Diseases')

    Recent reports and publications indicate that in addition to mycoplasmal infections, CFS/ME and FMS patients have other chronic infections caused by other intracellular bacteria and viruses. For example, patients with Lyme Disease, caused by intracellular Borrelia infections, have been diagnosed with CFS/ME. Also, CFS/ME and FMS patients can have intracellular Chlamydia species infections. These patients can also have infections by other bacteria that enter their bodies through 'leaky gut' problems. Chronically ill patients often have inflammatory bowel syndrome and other gut problems, and this can allow pathogenic bacteria to enter their systems.

    Patients with CFS/ME and FMS can also have viral infections that complicate their conditions and cause morbidity. Such infections can occur with or without the bacterial infections described above. Viruses that have been associated with CFS/ME and FMS are Human Herpes Virus-6 (HHV-6) and Cytomeglovirus (CMV). These viruses have been found at high incidence in chronically ill patients, and especially those with CFS/ME. Patients with CFS/ME or FMS can have predominantly intracellular bacterial infections, predominantly viral infections, or a combination of intracellular bacterial and viral infections. This may be one reason why the underlying causes of these chronic illnesses are so difficult to determine and effectively treat. The other reason could be the persistent nature of the infections and their ability to hide inside cells where they are essentially refractory to immune system responses, their slow growing natures and their relative insensitivity to therapeutic drugs (see references below).

    A new direction at the Institute is studying the role of decreased cellular energy in causing fatigue. Cellular energy is mainly produced by the mitochondria, subcellular organelles that contain the machinery that converts fats and sugars to energy in the form of the high-energy molecules, such as ATP. Mitochondrial function requires an intact inner membrane where the electron transport chain or energy machinery is located. When the inner mitochondrial membrane is damaged, the efficiency of the electron transport chain is reduced along with the ability of cells to produce the energy that they need for vital functions—thus fatigue becomes a problem. Various environmental insults and even aging produce excess oxidation molecules that can damage the mitochondrial membrane, including chronic infections of the type mentioned above. At the Institute for Molecular Medicine clinical studies have shown the benefits of dietary membrane lipids (Lipid Replacement Therapy) in replacing damaged mitochondrial membrane lipids, increasing the efficiency of the electron transport chain, increasing energy and reducing fatigue. A number of non-pharmaceutical approaches to decreasing fatigue are being investigated at the Institute.

  • Really interesting stuff! Well done.

    Piggie hugs xxx

  • Isnt it? and thank you.. Im on a roll.... lol... well in my mind a rock and roll...but in physicality I will just have to do with the imagination.. But definately something here and even if we can help control the fatigue thats half the battle.. ;-) xxx

  • And so regarding the above Lipid Replacement Therapy....

    A recent research paper conducted on people with moderate and severe fatigue showed within eight weeks there was a 40% reduction in fatigue. Another clinical study with these formulas showed a 37% increase in energy in just one week!!!

    So yes these would be dietry supplements, which I am trying to source ones that make sense to me... and the correct labelling etc. I suppose a good nutritional therapist may have access... would be good to see one of them perhaps...xxx

  • Found this a very interesting research thank you Lacey

  • This is certainly thought-provoking!

    It has long been my opinion and indeed experience, that almost any disease can be improved by correct nutrition, and in some cases, supplements which fall outside the normal food range ( remember Lorenzo's Oil ?). The evidence is overwhelming that the body can usually heal itself if given the right tools!

    Let's hope that some boffin can find a supplement to help us fibromites get better, and in the meantime, let's watch programs like 'The Food Hospital' where they seem to have amazing results.

    I always try to eat a healthy diet of mostly unprocessed foods, and this definitely improves my symptoms, tho' I'm not cured. I have RA as well as Fibro, and so I follow an anti-inflammatory diet ( see 'Food Hospital' website for details). It definitely improves the RA, and seems to reduce the crushing fatigue associated with Fibro. It also keeps your insides regular, reducing the effects of IBS. There is a weight-controlling influence, too, so you really can't lose, can you!

    Am posting most of this as a separate blog as I find the subject so interesting. Thanks Lacey for your painstaking research and interesting blog!

  • Hi :)

    Thanks for posting Lacey, :) I really enjoyed reading - I haven't checked out the link yet just the bit in brief, but it gave me some excellent insight. Do you know what sort of food contains lipids?

    Thanks to everyone else who commented too. You know I really think they is so much hope for us. :) A cure for these conditions is surely impending. I agree with what ladymoth said about dietry supplements - I haven't heard of Lorenzo's Oil. Currently I'm taking montmorency cherries ('Cherry Actifs' supplements- Holland & B) which contains a natural anti inflammatory, thus helping to muscle pain - it actually strengthens them & heals faster. , And contains Melatonine which is sleep inducing so helps with insomnia. It is certainly helping me and Dad (Dad is generally well but he suffers with back pain), the two of us have experianced a big reduction in Restless Legs Syndrome which I know is a problem for many of us. I seems to be helping me sleep as well. I wasn't sure whether to mention all this seeing as someone mentioned it as a blog already - but I wasn't sure how many commented either. Since cutting down on chocolate I feel much better - and eating healthier food instead does make me feel a lot better. :) Here's a simple tip for anyone struggling to sleep - eat a kiwi before bed. I saw it work wonders for a woman who suffered terrible, cripping insomnia on the Food Hospital (it also contains a chemical which produces melatonine)- which we watch occasionally. We ought to start watching it more as it gives great advice. :) I may have to have a Dad with my Dad about the shopping list again! :D Thank Fog for that. ;) xxx

    Take care Lacey, Keep smiling and Gentle hugs from me. :) Love to you all

    Fay :) xxx

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