second infertility problems

Hi Can anyone help me.

I am 31 this year and I have a 6year old son. Me and my partner have been together since I was 19. I had no problems in conceiving my son but this time round we have been trying since last year September and still no luck.

I have been going to my doctors and she is doing a lot of tests. The last 3 bloods test result have indicated that I am not ovulating every month and when I do ovulate it is still low. My doctor how I have appointment with next month said that she will be referring my to infertility.

Do you no if we will get help on the NHS as I'm not sure as I have a partner and a child already???????

Its just I'm 31 in October and would love just once more to have another child to complete our family.

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My friend went through the same thing but they had to pay private as they had a daughter already. She got put on clomid and after 3 months got pregnant. Don't know how expensive it is to have to pay for it but it definitely got her ovulating properly. Good luck xx

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Ah how frustrating for you both, I'm pretty sure you won't get NHS funding as you already have a child but they will help you with options of IUI or IVF etc. There are some great private clinics you can be treated in and very quickly with out the long NHS waiting times. Xx

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Hi we got referred to assisted fertility after ttc for 2 years. We didn't qualify for NHS funding as we had 2 children already. I was 31at the time. I wasn't ovulating either, they referred me to my GP for day 21 progesterone bloods which kept coming back around 19 and they need to be over 30 to confirm ovulation, routine testing flagged up underactive thyroid which needed medication. My husband had to have routine sperm analysis done and they revealed very low motility. (3%) they then wouldn't even consider clomid as they pretty much blamed his sperm (even tho it was proved I wasn't ovulating) 🙄 So they said only option IVF which was were it ended for us as we were looking at 8k and upwards. We tried for almost another 3 years, and then in May we got a complete shock with a BFP 🙏

I think with a combination of the thyroid meds and weight loss, (for me and hubby) must have corrected things.

I don't know biologically what changed from having our first 2 without trying to 5 years conceiving the 3rd. Just taught me you can never take things for granted. if it is only clomid you need your GP can prescribe that on advice from fertility and you would just have to pay standard prescription charge.

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They will give you Clomid for free to boost your ovulation if that's what you need and all exploratory tests but anything after that you will need to pay private. Hopefully the NHS can help and you just need to wait a bit longer. Good luck

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Hi chrystal30. it could be that you just need your oulation regulating with a drug e.g. Clomid. Before this was prescribed you would most probably need to have an HSG test to check the patency of your Fallopian tubes. Obviously you won't know until you see the specialist, but hopefully any further investigations will be covered by the NHS. It would all depend upon funding criteria in your area for any treatment needed. Hope all is soon sorted out for you. Diane

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Hello dear!

It is true that if you don’t ovulate regularly, it becomes quite difficult for you to conceive. It makes it extremely hard for you to synchronize your intercourse with ovulation. Many problems may make it difficult for a woman to ovulate. They are listed as the causes of infertility. Hypothalamus is an area of the brain that is associated with ovulation. Adrenal glands, pituitary, and thyroid glands are believed to play a critical role in ensuring that an egg is released by the ovaries. Now hypothalamus is supposed to secrete gonadotropin which will in turn release hormones that stimulate the pituitary gland to help it produce hormones that finally stimulate the ovaries and trigger ovulation. It also stimulates luteinizing hormones that stimulates the follicles to release a mature egg. Also if the other glands malfunction, for instance, if the adrenal glands overproduce the male hormones or if the thyroid glands under produce or overproduce thyroid hormones, it becomes difficult to keep the ovaries and the pituitary glands in balance. This may make it difficult for a woman to ovulate and so it becomes difficult for her to conceive. Notice that ovulation problems may result from certain disorders. For instance, ladies with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) which is characterized by excess weight and which leads to excess production of male hormones may make it difficult for a woman to ovulate. Excessive exercises may also deprive the body of the fats required to help one ovulate. Use of certain drugs such as antidepressants and progestin and estrogens could also lead to anovulation. So my dear, you better see a doctor for help.

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