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Diabetes Research & Wellness Foundation
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A Long Overnight!: DEXCOM

Well, I've never heard of such a long overnight when an overnight turns into more than 72 hours for something. To me, when I hear the word(s): 'overnight', that to me says either there's going to be a sleepover or expecting to see something at the door waiting the next day. That wasn't the case this time, unfortunately. Lucky me, I finally got the 9 sensors that I needed ( I had used the last one at the time). Having to wait for something that is suppose to help a person 24/7 and you don't have them right away can make a person very stressed out and upset. This is one reason why I hadn't been writing that much lately. The other reason is because I've been really busy with a few things, but I have been around in the background.

With some good news, the sensor that I just removed today worked for the entire 7 days! :-) The one I inserted today is working so far. Will see how it goes before I say anything about it.

Well, more to come soon. Stay warm! We're suppose to get snow starting Sunday afternoon into Monday morning. The forecaster said somewhere between 3-6 inches by the time it's all over. Hopefully, he's wrong. :-)

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Good to hear things went right in the end, but I know you will have to stay on top of it as much as you can. The stress is less when you have sufficient supplies.

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Yes, you’re right about that one!😀👍

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Hi,

I'm glad your DEXCOM is working better. It's such a shame that big pharma doesn't really care about the people that need their products, it's more about monetary profit over a patient's life and wellbeing.

TT x.

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Thank you!😀👍

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Hi activity2004,

Must be your american speak but I really don't understand what you’re saying!

Is it that you were expecting a delivery of something and it didn’t come when expected?

And what on earth is a sensor? And where do you insert it?

Miles

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Hi PiloMilo,

A sensor is something that you insert under your skin/stomach area that can transmit blood sugars every 5 minutes. It’s part of a CGM (Continuous Glucose Monitoring) system. The sensor sends the numbers to a transmitter and the transmitter sends the number to a receiver that sends the number to my phone and to the followers who have been invited to see the numbers when the low alarm signals. I’be been using the CGM for 3.5 years now.😀👍 It’s alarmed during the night here and there when it wasn’t supposed to, but it helps me when I’m really running low and don’t know it( I can’t feel lows).😀

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Aha thanks activity! I never heard of that and I have had diabetes for more than 15 years. Not to be able to detect lows must be awful! Are you allowed to drive? Over here if you take insulin (which I had to for 5 months post liver transplant) you cannot drive if it has been more tha 2 hours since. you last took a BSL reading.

Miles

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Hi Miles,

I’ve been Diabetic for 36 years ( I’m 38 years old). It’s not easy sometimes when you can’t figure out that you’re dropping, but that’s one reason for the CGM. The other reason is for having tighter control of the blood sugars 24/7. I’m considered to be a brittle diabetic. I don’t drive and I take two types of insulin. I’m also on a low carb high protein diet along with a gluten free diet plan for gluten intolerance issues.

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Oh my. Poor you. Another term I’ve not heard of - “brittle diabetic”. I often feel brittle but mostly when I have done more than I should 😁. I did have two types of insulin a rapid one and a slow release one. Same? Gosh your tummy must be like a pin cushion ☹️.

Oh my I’m glad I’m not on those food restrictions. There are loads of things I’m supposed to avoid post transplant but I’m a bit naughty and eat most (but not all) things but in moderation. So I’m not quite a 😇.

Are you managing OK. Bit of a silly question really if you’ve been ongoing for 36 years 👎🏻.

Hope you keep “well”.

Miles

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Thank you! Can I send you a private message?

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With some time over the years, I have had to use different insulin in vials and a few years ago— insulin pens. I use Novolog— short acting and Basaglar— long acting. I also have to do testing between 6-8 times a day. It’s more when I do the calibrations for the sensors to start working on the first day after the warm up period is over.😀👍

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