Info please!

Hi all,

This is my first post. I have decided to do a 5 k run in September for charity. I did my first training session on Thursday night. I am unfit and thought my lungs would collapse or burst out of my chest! I am planning on my next session tomorrow but my quad muscles still ache so am I ok to still do it if I stretch? I am a novice and not really sure if I'm doing it right!

7 Replies

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  • Very very well done on making the choice to start getting fitter. It won't be long before you're as hooked as the rest of us. My best advice is to follow the instructions on the podcasts to the letter (apart from the one about 'heel strike' which has since been discredited) and you'll be just fine. The link I've included will take you to to a page on the NHS site with advice on running technique and to stretches for runners. Take care and happy running :)

    healthunlocked.com/couchto5...

  • Well done for getting started. Your lungs and body are bound to rebel a bit. As ancientmum advises, stretches after running do help with the stiffness but you are mound to feel a bit achey - doesn't mean that you are doing it wrong.

    Good luck - just trust the programme - it really works.

  • Hi Jue, well done for getting started. Good advice from AM and UR above. You may have been running too fast, so slow down and don't let yourself feel like your chest could burst. Stretch gently at the end of the run, and if the aches continue, allow 2 days rest between each run. There is a long time 'til September and you don't want to get hurt along the way.

  • Thanks for the replies, I really want to get it right as I did feel a sense of achievement on Thursday and want to carry on. I did do some stretching after but obviously not enough!

    My running partner is away next week so I will have to keep momentum going by myself so It is really nice to have support -thanks again.

  • Follow the programme. Don't be tempted to do too much too soon. If you are struggling at any stage, try slowing down. Remember to take your rest days. If you reach the end of the week and you feel you aren't quite ready to step up to the next week, there's no harm in repeating it. The course takes a minimum of 9 weeks, but takes many people a few weeks longer. The aim of the programme is really to get you up to running for 30 minutes continuously. Speed will come later.

    Above all, trust in Laura. Over the past few years I've gone out several times in a disorganised manner, done a couple of "training" runs without any real plan and given up, coming to the conclusion that I'll never be a runner. I ached all over, was hopelessly out of breath and had generally pushed myself too hard, but achieved very little.

    In November last year I discovered the NHS Couch to 5K programme and followed it. Five months later, at the age of 61, I've just come in from my weekly 5K parkrun and am a little annoyed with myself that I got wedged in at the start and only did it in 22:32. I know I'm faster than that. I came in 31st (out of about 150) and know I should have finished about 25th. Five months ago I would have told anyone that it would be impossible that I'd ever run a 5K in under 40 minutes (if I could even run 5K).

  • I'll just add to the other comments that your legs *will* ache during the first coiple of weeks or so - I know mine did, it felt like I'd been beaten on my thighs with a baseball bat! After those first couple of weeks, the aches go. My legs haven't ached after a run since about week three.

  • Hi and welcome. You came to the right place. My description of my level of fitness when I first pulled on my running shoes less than two years ago wouldn't have been much different to your own. This morning I ran 13 miles...... As others said, follow the programme and you will succeed. It ain't easy at times, but you know what? After a while you actually cease to want it to be easy.

    Now, off you go and then come back and tell us all about it!

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