Slowly getting distance up: After graduating... - Bridge to 10K

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Slowly getting distance up

JaniceG68
JaniceG68
14 Replies

After graduating on 3 June, I’ve done 3 more runs, the 2 most recent using the Stepping Stones podcast with Laura. I managed 4K today and my pace has improved from the last couple of weeks. I’m just wondering how do you increase distance - is it going faster or Just keeping going as I’m usually tired out by 35-40 mins (including warm up/down walls). Not sure if I can actually run much longer than that at the moment.

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UpTheStanley
UpTheStanleyGraduate10

Generally, you increase distance by going slower - which then means you can do shorter distances faster. I started on the Bridge being only very occasionally able to do 5k in 25 mins (5'00"/k), reached 10k in 55 mins (5'30"/k) and 16k in 1 hour 40 (6'15"/k). Meanwhile my "good day" 5k time is approaching 24 mins.

Note I started the Bridge as someone who had always ran occasionally, not as a C25K graduate like you - the C25K journey being something I deeply respect. So the actual times I've quoted aren't really relevant, it's the differences that matter.

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JaniceG68

Thank you. 😊🏃🏻‍♀️

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Dexy5
Dexy5Graduate10

Congratulations on your graduation. To increase distance I slowed down and ran for longer on only one run a week. You should not increase your weekly running distance by more than 10% each week. So you can do a shorter faster run, a longer slower run and your usual run.

But don’t forget that it’s recommended to just consolidate those 30 minute runs for 3 weeks after graduation so that your body catches up with this new running you.

Have fun and enjoy some new routes.

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JaniceG68
JaniceG68
in reply to Dexy5

Thank you. Yes I am just thinking ahead as I want to do a Park Run at end of June so will continue what I’m doing until then. 😊🏃🏻‍♀️

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Dexy5
Dexy5Graduate10
in reply to JaniceG68

Theres no problem with running parkrun at anytime as you can start with your 5 minute walk and then run just like W9 . I did my first one just after graduation and have become totally addicted ever since.

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Coddfish
CoddfishGraduate10

I suggest forgetting about pace entirely. The only way to run a longer distance is to find a pace you can sustain for the length of time involved, which is probably slower than your 4K pace. As a first step it’s worth getting to the point where you can cover 5k, as a walk/run if necessary. If you haven’t yet tried parkrun, to give a weekly focus for this, I thoroughly recommend it.

Don’t be afraid of approaching longer distances through run/walk intervals - it’s not the method those following juju’s plan use, but it’s the method that worked for me. First time at a distance, break it down into blocks of 1k followed by 2 minutes walking. As you get stronger and the distances longer, it will become 2k blocks or even 3k blocks. The short walks give a chance to recover, drink water if needed etc. If it helps, think about adding time rather than distance, it will amount to the same thing. Plus never add more than 10% to your total running time in a week, and don’t try to run more than 1 long run a week.

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JaniceG68
JaniceG68
in reply to Coddfish

Thank you. That makes sense to me and I’m hoping to do. Park run at the end of the month. 😊🏃🏻‍♀️

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Carowood

I am exactly in the same position as you as regards distance and time. I have also felt lost without Laura these last two weeks.

You would think 🤔 going faster but it seems you need to slow right down (although not sure how much slower I can get!).

I will have a look at the stepping stones podcast - thanks.

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JaniceG68
JaniceG68
in reply to Carowood

Yes that’s the advice I’ve been getting - slow down. Same here as I’m pretty slow already. I like the podcasts as tried my first run after graduation with just music in my ears and felt a bit lost.

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Granspeed
Granspeed60minGraduate
in reply to JaniceG68

I graduated in March and have decided everyone’s slow is different! And sometimes even my own slow is different😱. Which makes it very tricky to be too explicit about timing.

I pulled a tendon gardening & had to have a rest from running and am now building back up in distance & time. I do NOT recommend the injury method ☹️, but it’s been useful in really teaching me about slow and steady. My longer recovery runs are around 10 minutes per km. 🐢 That is slow, slow, slower than I ever was before. However, I can now keep that pace going as long as I wish & I am never out of breath or sore.

So that’s one way to think about “slow”. (You’ll know me when you pass me as you walk. 😄)

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misswobble
misswobbleGraduate10

Slow, slow, slower. Chew up those miles nice and steady. Slow running and rest days build legs. The Stepping Stones podcasts will help your running for sure. Do them regularly 😃👍🏃‍♀️

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JaniceG68

Thanks. I will 😊🏃🏻‍♀️

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cheekychipmunks
cheekychipmunksGraduate10

I’m a huge advocate of the humble paced runner. I can toddle along for 2 hours+ happily, as I stick at a comfy pace. So don’t get hung up on going faster yet. That’ll come with time. Instead, as the others have said, consolidate for a few weeks to gain strength, then gradually increase the distance of one run per week. Or even jump on board the Magic 10 plan like lots of us have. Have fun most of all! 😀

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JaniceG68

Thank you! I will take it nice and slow 😊🏃🏻‍♀️

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