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Thyroid UK
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TPO antibodies have reduced- is this significant?

Evening all, I had initial blood tests in October 2017 which showed raised TSH and very high TPO levels at 950 (normal range 0-35).

I've been taking levothyroxine since October 2017, currently taking 62.5 daily. I've also been taking vitamin d supplement as this was low, and I went gluten free in November 2017.

I've just had a retest done, TSH has dropped to 2.5, (I'm 8 months pregnant so the normal range is 0.05-2.5). TPO has dropped from 950 to 91. (0-35 is normal range). Vit D is within normal range.

My question is specifically with TPO- I had this one done privately as GP said there was no point in knowing what the number is as it varies so much- does it mean anything significant regarding my health? I was assuming that it going down is a good thing, but if it varies all the time, maybe it isn't worth me keeping an eye on this?

Thanks for any advice.

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Your doctor is right. No point in keep testing it. If it was high once, you have Hashi's, and that isn't going to go away no matter how low the antibodies drop. The antibodies aren't the disease, they are the result of the disease but fluctuate. You can even have Hashi's without ever having high antibodies. :)

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My Functional Dr. tests my antibodies every time she tests my thyroid. The antibodies point to Hoshimotos. They do hold relevance in how much your immune system is attacking. The lower you can get them the better, it will help so you don’t have as many fluctuations in your hormones and with inflammation.

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I agree with Hormone-mess. I managed to reduce my antibodies from over 3000 to 250. I test them every time and they have been gradually reducing and now stabilised at circa 200 level. Definitely an improvement on 3000. I test every other month I don’t see any fluctuations at all.

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Hi, Annaso, could you tell us how you reduced your antibodies? I've tried diet and nothing's helped so far. Gluten-free, dairy-free did nothing. And I personally think missing out on essential B-vitamins in grains and the good fats in dairy may be harmful in then end. Anyway, please let us know how you got thyroid antibodies under control.

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Hi Katasun,

I was taking Ayurvedic herbs prescribed by my Ayurvedic doctor. The antibodies dropped to that level in the span of 2/3 months. I couldn’t believe my eyes at first. It wasn’t a coincidence as as said I have been testing antibodies every two months or so and I have never had a reading lower than 1500 belfore let alone 200! They have consistently been the same level since.

I am also gluten free and vegan but that made no difference until the herbs.

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Hi! Very interested in the herbs! What were you given? I have heard professor Tim Spector talk about spices being high in something that is good for gut microbes. A balanced gut may this lead to reduced inflammation and immune system flare-ups!

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Hi Zmironova!

I was given a combination of Ayurvedic herbs to balance me and get rid of inflammation. They are Indian herbs as Ayurveda is from there. As I just explained to Katasun below I would be very sharing what I took as it can make you unwell. Ayurvedic herbs are very personal.

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Hi, AnnaSo, that's amazing about the herbs. Could you give the names of the herbs? You say "were" taking them, so you've stopped now that the numbers are good?

I've started chamomile tea 2-3 times a day after reading about a Greek study showing people who drink chamomile and other herb teas have fewer thyroid problems including thyroid cancer than people who don't regularly take herbal/chamomile tea.

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Hi Katasun,

In Ayurveda herbs are prescribed strictly based on your dosha- your body composition of nature’s elements. There are 3 main body types: Vata (eather and air), Pita (fire), Kapha (earth and water). Only Ayurvedic doctor can properly determine which body type you are and what is right you. Each body type responds differently to food, drinks as well as weather, environment, type of work. For me this is a good explanation as of why for example one person does well on vegan or keto diet with great result and not the other. The same for exercise, some do great on CrossFitt some not. List goes on. It is all about balancing your body.

I am Vata (ether and air) and herbs that would balance my unbalanced body (I need herbs with air properties; all herbs have different properties) would not be the same as for someone who is predominantly ‘fire’, for example. In fact, it would imbalance them even more because as in nature- air makes more fire. Does that make sense? It’s probably a lot to take in, I tried to be as comprehensive as can be on something quite complex as the concept of Ayurveda 🙂

Aturvedic herbs are becoming more and more popular and mainstream(Curcumin, Ashwaghanda, Rhodiola, Triphala) etc but people pop them like it was vitamins C without understanding of the Ayurveda. I believe that is why some some on this forum have negative effects from Ashwaghanda especially- it will balance some but not the others.

Hope this helps. I stopped the herbs as cured my inflammation 🙂

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Thanks for the information. Yes, I realize everyone's different. I have almost zero Hashi's symptoms--no weight, fatigue, energy problems--but high thyroid antibodies. I don't take medication either. I also had a horrible experience with Chinese herbs and so am wary of herbs in general. But if what I'm doing doesn't work--NAC, eating organic, and other supplements, I might try Ayurveda.

Thanks again.

By the way, for anyone interested, there is some interesting research on glyphosate and its negative health effects, including sulphur pathway disruption--in very lay terms--which may be implicated in many diseases, including autoimmune diseases like Hashi's. This may be why a poster in another thread found NAC brought down thyroid antibodies. NAC is a glutathione precursor, and glutathione is essential for producing thyroid hormone.

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Hey Katasun,

And how are your results? Is your TSH elevated? The problem is symptoms might come later (which I hope they won’t for you!) but you’re doing a great job doing sth about it. Unfortunately one cannot “heal” Hashi so once you have antibodies that pretty much means you’ll sooner or later will have some issues.

I also tried everything. Antibodies are left of my worry to be honest. I rather lose the symptoms and the weight ☺️ although I have to say that NDT has helped me with the former not the latter yet 😢

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And btw I ordered some NAC and it came today and I can’t wait to try!!! 😬

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Hi, AnnaSo,

I've just started taking NAC, just a few days now. I don't know if it's just in my head, but my thyroid doesn't have that sort of thick feeling. It feels "normal." I'm praying this is finally the answer. I keep off the weight with running. The person who posted about NAC and lower thyroid antibodies started the thread with this:

"N-Acetylcysteine reducing antibodies?" And someone else posted explaining why NAC might just be fixing things. It's really encouraging.

Good luck with the NAC.

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Fingers crossed ☺️ hope it works for both of us ☺️

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Hi, AnnaSo, check out the thread with username "dang" and selenium causing a rise in antibodies. I posted there about an Italian study using myo-inositol and selenium for subclinical hypothyroidism with GREAT results. I'm buying Inositol today!! Also read that NAC can spread cancer cells, so I will not take it every day--until the inositol arrives then will do that alone. Good luck.

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Oh yes! I’ve read somewhere about inositol! It’s meant to help with water retention too. Aaah I completely forgot about this one. Thanks Katasun! ☺️

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How do you feel? Do you have any symptoms? If you feel good, your doc is right, if you feel bad and/or still have symptoms he is (probably) wrong.

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Thanks for the replies- I feel fine, which is the main thing- the thyroid condition was discovered 10 months ago from preliminary infertility investigations & feeling sooo tired, rather than gut or stomach complaints.

I suppose I originally assumed that the higher the antibodies, the greater the levothyroxine dose needed, but now I'm thinking that's not really the case or a relevant link? x

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You are correct in the antibodies and the medication. The lower you get your antibodies the slower the die off of your thyroid. If your antibodies remain high and you don’t address the autoimmune aspect, your medication will likely need to be increased indefinitely. If you feel fine, no need to address them just plan on having your medication adjusted regularly.

Did you ever conceive?

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Thanks for clarifying this... can i ask- what happens when the thyroid does eventually die out? Is that a point when further health problems come in, or do patients deal with it by taking really large doses of medication? Has it physically disappeared by this point or would I need it removing?

Yes baby is due in less than a month now, we have been so fortunate (after a major placenta abruption and several consecutive chemical pregnancies before). GP started me on a starter dose of 25 mcg and I must have conceived about 6/8 weeks later. So far so good x

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I’m so happy to hear you are pregnant and expecting soon! Congratulations! Babies are wonderful and a lot of work, but so worth it. They grow up fast, so cherish every minute!

Yes, as your thyroid is attacked, it slowly loses function. Some people require more medication as years progress from my research. The medication isn’t the big deal in my opinion. I personally am more concerned with the autoimmune aspect and try to take care of myself better ie. stress, diet, exercise etc. The unfortunate aspect many Dr.’s do not tell you is that autoimmune conditions tend to cluster. What I mean by that is once you are diagnosed with one, you have a higher chance of being diagnosed with another. I have two, and possibly a third, but they aren’t positive why I have premature ovarian failure which is the possible third one.

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