Thyroid UK

How to Convince a Dr that low vitamin B12 vitamin D and Ferritin whilst in the "range" needs to be treated for those with Hypothyroidism?

Okay my last blood results are

Vitamin B 12 - 206 (197 - 771)

Ferritin 33 (13 - 150)

Vitamin 59 (50 - 79)

My Doctor thinks these are normal and I need to try and convince him that they are not normal for hypo's - are there any papers out there that can help me ? Any advice would be of help

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I'm not sure you'll be able to convince your doctor if you are in the UK. They won't treat you if you're in NHS range. If you have symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency, the best thing you can do is to post results of B12 and folate on the Healthunlocked Pernicious Anaemia forum and get some information from the experts.

I presume the last result was for vitamin D? if so then there should be a laboratory comment next to the range, do you know what it is?

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Yes its D greater than 50nmol/L is sufficient in most individuals

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KarlNorge,

Your results are normal because they are within range but they are not optimal. NHS will usually only treat vit/minerals when they are deficient. Hypothyroid patients don't need higher levels than the rest of the population.

B12 deficiency isn't just about serum blood levels. If you have symptoms of B12 deficiency in b12deficiency.info/signs-an... go to healthunlocked.com/pasoc for advice how to persuade your GP to treat you. If you aren't symptomatic you can buy 1,000mcg methylcobalamin to raise your B12 level.

Ferritin is optimal halfway through range. You can raise ferritin by supplementing iron with 1,000mcg vitamin C to aid absorption and minimise constipation.

VitD is optimal around 100. I would supplement 5,000iu D3 for 6 weeks and then reduce to 5,000iu alternate days and retest in April.

Iron and vitD should be taken 4 hours away from Levothyroxine.

If you buy on Amazon please use the affiliate link healthunlocked.com/thyroidu...

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Hello Clutter

Am I right in thinking that people with hypothyroidism often have a lower than optimum Vit B 12

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KarlNorge,

Not necessarily. There's no doubt that 206 is very low although it is still within range. As I said, it's not just about the blood level, its also about whether or not you have symptoms which might be caused by low B12 levels and that's why I advised you to contact the PAS forum who are the experts on PA, B12 and folate deficiency.

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Not specific to thyroid patients but interesting article about functional vitamin B12 deficiency. BMJ so docs should take notice of it.

bmj.com/content/349/bmj.g52...

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Interesting that not all patients improved .The report does not specify which form of cobalamin was used ,unless I missed it.

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Unfortunately, I think you get little help or understanding from doctors about low vitamin and mineral levels. Even my severe deficiencies were not treated appropriately, and I had to fight to get tested in the first place. There is usually no acknowledgement that our levels should be optimal, not just “in range” – I had awful symptoms, and still got nowhere.

I did have a discussion with my named GP about having low stomach acid, which is often associated with Hashimoto’s – she shrugged, still wanted me on a PPI (for high stomach acid, duh!), and advised me to eat more Marmite for my deficient B12. I’ve been refused further vitamin D testing despite being continually deficient.

I couldn’t bear to keep banging my head against a brick wall, and now get tested privately and sort out my own supplements. I resent the lack of care, and having to fund everything myself, but the stress involved in trying to get through to these people was detrimental to my health.

Sorry not to be more helpful :(

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Beans - it is helpful because l know it's not just me - the Dr has done exactly as you said and has told me l am not deficient in vitamin B12 and therefore lwill not be treated !

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I'm not surprised by anything they do these days :(

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