Antibodies Test Results

I'm very very new to this and still getting my head around it all - I've already posted my long list of bloods and have had some very helpful advice and suggestions. Thank you, this site has been a life line.

Long story short ('ish) - Visit to GP and blood tests (elevated TSH, lower quarter T4/T3) as well as a whole panel of other tests - query over general immunity, so repeated. Requested thyroid antibody tests and got private tests also. GP has agreed to prescribe thyroxine at 100 mg (was I silly to say I'd try at 75 mg - then go to 100mg? worried I might dive in with too much, but think GP is on my side, so I don't think that'll be a problem).

So, had the GP tests (awaiting results) and did privates on the same day, which came back super quick:

TSH - H 6.67 (0.27 - 4.20)

T4 total 117.9 (64.5-142)

Free T4 16.47 (12-22)

Free T3 5.58 (3.1-6.8)

TPO H 230.3 (<34)

TGAb H 731 (<115)

I've taken on board all the suggestions about supplements etc, and will be starting on these tomorrow and had liver last night. I know it'll take a bit of time to get vitamins and iron levels up a bit to optimal. I've not yet started on thyroxine.

The antibodies levels look startling to me (not looked at any comparisons) - what can I do to reduce these other than reducing gluten and sugar. How alarming are the numbers to you?

7 Replies

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  • SolsticeSS Start your supplements one at a time. Start with one, give it a week or two then add the second one, give it another week or two and add the next one, etc. That way, if there is an adverse reaction you'll know what caused it.

    Your antibodies are high but some people have had them in the thousands. Don't just reduce gluten, you need to be strictly gluten free. Some people, but not everyone, also need to be dairy free, but one step at a time :) .

    Selenium L-selenomethionine 200mcg daily can help reduce antibodies, and keeping TSH very low or suppressed is also supposed to.

    Make sure you arrange a new blood test 6-8 weeks after starting Levo, you will probably find that an increase is necessary and these should be 25mcg at a time. After each increase, make sure another test is done 6-8 weeks later. You're aiming for a TSH of 1 or below and FT4 and FT3 in the upper part of their respective reference ranges if that is where you feel well.

    All thyroid tests should be done at the earliest appointment of the day, fast overnight (water only), and leave off Levo for 24 hours.

    Always take your Levo on an empty stomach, one hour before or two hours after food, with water only, not tea, coffee, milk, and a couple of hours away from other meds and supplements, iron, calcium and Vit D four hours.

  • SeasideSusie thank you for the quick reply and guidance with supplements - is everything likely to become more sensitive? I no longer drink alcohol as I feel dreadful for days afterwards.

    Part of me is relieved that it is Hashimoto's (?) in that it's what is wrong with me, but the other part of me is a little anxious about the reality of it all. I'm hopeful and maintaining a positive view as best I can. I know I'm lucky that I've not had the struggle with my GP which so many others have had.

    I've never felt great when I've had too much bread, pasta etc but wouldn't have put me down as allergic. Is it that once the thyroid starts to go wrong everything gut related goes awry?

  • Gluten can cause thyroid to go out of whack. Go gluten free, maybe dairy free. Thyroid issues are generally rooted in other health problems.

  • Here are some links to websites explaining gut and gluten connection

    chriskresser.com/the-gluten...

    thyroidpharmacist.com

    chriskresser.com/the-thyroi...

  • So, I'm sat here thinking what I can have for breakfast, if I'm to start going gluten free. Typically I have a mix of Allbran, whole rolled oats, chia seeds and Flax seeds, with Almond milk and microwave this for a warming start.

    From what I'm reading about GF EVERYTHING in my typical breakfast is a big no no!

    What do people eat when starting out on their GF path?

  • I'm also hashimotos and it is hard at first to go GF but there are loads of GF product s available (I admit some of them taste awful) but it's a live and learn process. Big supermarket have special isles of "healthy food's you will find GF stuff there. I do shops online there are loads of suppliers I have GF puffed rice quite often for breakfast I use coconut milk as I found I was milk intolerant years ago. I have eggs occasionally with rice crackers for breakfast again there are loads if flavours etc of rice crackers (often near the crackers)/in supermarkets. GF takes some planning but it really is do abke, I have a very fussy husband but I've made gram flour Yorkshire puddings (saw it on here) they were great!! Just exoerimen sone of mine have been not so good but it keeps me feeling a lot better I don't get thyroid spikes anymore Good luck

  • Debsoxford - thank you for the ideas. It's all a bit confusing :) I've always loved bread type things but have often felt it doesn't like me. Why is it we love the things which our bodies don't?

    I ended up having mushrooms, cooked in coconut oil, and scrambled egg with some tomatoes. All okay when you have the energy and time!

    gram flour - can you use that to thicken sauces too? It's made me think about everything. I usually use corn flour - not sure if that is GF!!!

    It's all a learning pathway I suppose. But just when you think problem solved - i.e getting tests and realising you'll need thyroid replacement and sorting out vitamins, then lurking around the corner is something else to get to grips with!

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