T3...does it cause bone thinning

My daughter is on 20mgs of T3 {10mgs in the morning /10mgs in the evening}, she also take 100mgs T4 Monday to Friday and 50mgs on weekends. On her last visit to the endo she was told that being on T3 long term would cause bone problems? Is this correct or was it a case of the endo trying to save the NHS budget? My daughter has been feeling much better with T3 and I was going to ask the endo if she could stop taking T4.

I would really appreciated some advice I'm sure I read that Dr Lowe said it was better being just on T3.

thank you

7 Replies

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  • Anjh-blue, Ask your daughter's endo what evidence s/he has that T3 causes bone loss. This 20-year observational study of patients on T4+T3 and T3 only finds no risk.

    press.endocrine.org/doi/abs...

  • Thank you Clutter I certainly will.

  • anjh-blue,

    Healthy bone metabolism requires thyroid levels that are neither too high nor low.

    High thyroid hormones (over range) & a very low TSH can encourage osteoporosis, osteopenia, or bone loss.

    Bone is continuously broken down and replaced by cells known as osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Each cycle of bone “turnover” takes about 200 days and excess thyroid hormone will hasted this rate.

    Over range T3 puts patient at most risk as this up regulates the genes involved with bone resorption (or bone loss) and the genes involved with bone matrix formation and collagen maturation bone generation. This means that bone resorption exceeds bone production with a net loss of bone mass.

    The medical profession (wrongly) believes that a suppressed TSH will automatically cause calcium to be leeched from the bones but there is little evidence to support this.  

    Optimal thyroid hormones and especially T3 will help support good bone health.

    Flower

    Bone health and thyroid hormones

    tiredthyroid.com/blog/2012/...

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    Disclaimer: I am not a medical professional and this information is not intended to be a substitute for medical guidance from your own doctor. Please check with your personal physician before applying any of these suggestions.

    …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….........................

  • Thank you for this Flower007.

  • anjh-blue

    I have edited my post above to read

    ... a suppressed TSH ....

    & not

    .... a suppressed T4 ....

    as I initally mistakenly wrote.

    Flo

  • I have been taking T3 in combination with T4 for over 5 years now and at my latest bone density scan was told I have the bones of a 35 year-old... I am 61! So my answer to that one would be a resounding NO!

  • Thank you so much

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