NP Thyroid when I might have Adrenal problems


I have Hypothyroidism. I am currently on Synthroid, but am having lots of trouble losing weight. I requested my rT3 and T3 be tested. There was a problem, and my Doctor wanted to put me on NatureThyroid (I am in the USA by the way). I told him that I suspect that I might have Adrenal problems based on the book, "The Hormone Cure." He said that he would still put me on NatureThyroid. If there were problems, he would check my Adrenals.

My Insurance rejected NatureThyroid, so because I am still on Synthroid. I let the topic rest for a month, and researched whether low T3 is common during dieting. I came across something that said the body naturally lowers T3 during dieting to protect the muscle from being digested. There were studies cited. So I was content with this for about a week. Then I started questioning the reliability of this. There are others on T3 while dieting (with success and no muscle problems), and I already had Hypothyroidism before dieting. So my body's lowering of T3 might be more extreme then the participants of these studies.

So I did some research and discovered my insurance will cover NP Thyroid. I want to request it from my Doctor, but do not know if I is good to take before checking my Adrenals. This Doctor will not refer me to an endocrinologist (don't know why) so I am planning to change Doctors. It will be November before I can get in to the office I plan on switching to. After November it would take three months to see an endocrinologist.

So the question is: Do I what to request NP Thyroid from the new Doctor after explaining my possible Adrenal problems? Or request it now, and see if there are bad side effects linked to Adrenal problems?


I would have switched to getting ERFA from Canada, but they seem to be having some problems right now. (Long term customers are suddenly feeling horrible after the facility that made the pills changed, and the drug company is saying that nothing has changed. I don't want to get in the middle of that.)

5 Replies

  • Hi Armour and Erfa have changed and basically useless. Experience!


  • I don't know if it is useless or not. A lot of different medications will work on one person and not another. The change might have made it useless to some people who depended on the old combination, because it was a different medication then before. While it might have made it more useful to another person.

    That would be like me saying that Abilify (bipolar medication) is useless, when it works for a lot of people. It just wasn't the right fit for me. Yet, if they reformulated Abilify, it might stop working for some of the people it works for now. It might also suddenly work for me.

    I imagine everyone's body is a little different, just like everyone's brain is.

  • Hi I would not have believed it either. I read that Erfa and armour had changed since their new formula a lot of people say it is no good now. After taking armour for over 10 years my thyroid suddenly went very low. A friend gave me some of the old formula, and hay presto thyroid levels good .All with blood tests.


  • I would try the NP Thyroid and see how you feel. Sometimes worrying too much about the treatment can make us ill on its own.

  • I've been through some pretty crazy medication rides in the past. I am not overly worried so much as not wanting to stupidly jump onto another ride.

    I have concluded that my Doctor is a good Doctor. He suggested Naturethroid without me even requesting adding T3. He caught that I had Hypothyroidism without me even knowing why he was suddenly testing my thyroid.

    I am a little upset that he made it seem like Synthroid would fix everything, and that if my TSH level hadn't been clinically high, he wouldn't have caught the Hypothyroidism. I have doubts as to whether I should be letting my Primary care Doctor take care of my Thyroid, and not an Endocrinologist. I have no idea why he will not refer me to one. He did once, before it was discovered the hormone imbalance was likely Hypothyroidism. I did not like that Endocrinologist.

    He was willing to add the extra tests I requested (the ones he thought insurance would cover... I don't have good insurance, and am too poor to pay for my own tests.)

    I know there are more knowledgable Doctors in the area of the Thyroid. (As I had to request the extra tests, and he didn't decide to do them on his own.) Yet, I might have trouble finding one I can afford.

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