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Pernicious Anaemia Society
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Cyanocobalamin Clearance

If I inject Cyanocobalamin it’s my understanding that it circulates in the blood serum until it gets utilized into cells. My question is what happens to the cyanide molecule ? When does that get taken off? Once it gets into the cell ? Or is it still attached in my bloodstream until it’s either excreted or enters a cell. I’d hate to think I have molecules of b12 with cyanide floating around . Hope I am making sense.

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You inject into muscle (IM) or into fat under the skin (Subcutaneous) and not directly into the blood stream (IV).

In the muscles, The cyano molecules are given up for another molecule called either holo- or trans- to protect and carry the cobalamine molecules through the blood and across the cell wall into the cell.

The trace cyano is cleaned out of the blood by either the liver, into the bile and then into the gut, or by the kidneys into the urine.

I’m not medically trained and was very concerned about switching from hydroxo-B12 to cyano-B12 when I moved from the UK to the USA eight years ago. I inject cyano weekly with no issues and supplement with folic acid, a daily multivitamin and methyl-B12 sublinguals to handle stressful situations daily. I also take B1, B6 and trimethylglycine (TMG) to support repair of nerve damage.

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"In the muscles, The cyano molecules are given up for another molecule called either holo- or trans- to protect and carry the cobalamine molecules through the blood and across the cell wall into the cell."

No.

The cyano group isn't removed in the muscles.

The whole B12 molecule is bound to either transcobalamin or haptocorrin and carried in the blood like that.

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Hi Freezeframe the amount of cyanide is infinitely small and whatever happens to it (see pvanderaa's reply above) I've been having cyanocobamalin 1mg injection for almost 47 years and I'm still "clivealive" at the age of 77.

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To put the amount into context (I use cyano too), I believe the amount in each injection is less cyanide than you'd get in an apple pip. It's tiny, your body can process it, don't worry :)

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The cyanide stays attached to the B12 molecule while it is in the blood. It is released when the B12 enters the cell. But, as spacey1 says, the amount released is tiny.

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Makes sense. Thanks for the replies

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