changes of the body when you stop

A big reason for all of us is health. But I was wondering, about what the body repairs when you stop inhaling poison into it.

I have smoked for about 9 years. Its ranged from between 10 and 15, then went to 15 to 20 in the last 2 years approximately. What damage will I have done to my body, and what am I managing to avoid by stopping while I'm still young?

I think this is a real interesting subject, and one me and my work friend, who is a smoker, were talking about on thursday. She asked me if the body repairs itself when you stop, I said I really didn't know. Some things may go back to normal but you may have already done too much damage on some areas to be repaired?

Hope that makes sense. It might be a massive incentive for younger women and men to stop now

9 Replies

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  • Lots of answers here!

    quitsmokingsupport.com/bene...

    Certainly the younger you are when you quit the better chance you have of avoiding smoking related health problems. We've all put ourselves at risk of course, and I'm sure our lungs will never quite be what they would have been had we never smoked.

    I know people who've looked at the statistics and gone 'oh well if my statistical chances of being fine are OK as long as I stop when I'm 35, then that's when I'll stop' - which is, wow, how delusional and stupid?!? Statistics do not equal a cast-iron guarantee. Smoking destroys you no matter what your age.

    Well done for quitting. Hope the link helps!

    Helen

  • Lots of answers here!

    quitsmokingsupport.com/bene...

    Certainly the younger you are when you quit the better chance you have of avoiding smoking related health problems. We've all put ourselves at risk of course, and I'm sure our lungs will never quite be what they would have been had we never smoked.

    I know people who've looked at the statistics and gone 'oh well if my statistical chances of being fine are OK as long as I stop when I'm 35, then that's when I'll stop' - which is, wow, how delusional and stupid?!? Statistics do not equal a cast-iron guarantee. Smoking destroys you no matter what your age.

    Well done for quitting. Hope the link helps!

    Helen

    Thanks, will read that website. And pass on the info to my work friend.

    I agree, why wait? Its not exactly enjoyable panicking about when you're next cig is gonna be and panicking when u get to the end of a pack is it? Its not enjoyable living with an addiction so stop now!! Lol I'm 23 and waiting til I was older wasn't an option, I wanted to do it now.

  • Hi Rochelle

    The body changes i have noticed so far, well, mainly today...is growing a fine set of horns and a forked tail

  • Hi Rochelle

    The body changes i have noticed so far, well, mainly today...is growing a fine set of horns and a forked tail

    Lol!! Is that the devil coming out of you ?!

    I read the link helsbelles, interesting read!! I will pass on the link.

    What she was worried about was, and it got me thinking also, her mam died at new year. Shed gone in for a hernia removed and she just never got through the op, but the doctors confirmed she had died through breathing complications. She had stopped smoking about 30 years before that, so my friend was worried she might have already done too much damage.

  • Hiya Rochelle, unfortunately breathing problems whilst under anaesthetic is a rare but known risk when undergoing surgery whether you're a smoker or not. That's why you have to sign consent. Obviously this risk would have been way higher if she were still a smoker but I don't think the fact she had been an ex-smoker would have increased her risk after 30 years.

    Lisa x

  • ...I was wondering, about what the body repairs when you stop inhaling poison into it.

    I realise that the conversation has taken on a specific slant but regarding the above selected comment please see the following which has been copied off the web.

    • In 20 minutes:

    Your blood pressure and heart rate will return to normal. This immediately lowers your risk of having a heart attack. Your circulation will also improve, bringing fresh blood to your fingers and toes, so they may start to tingle.

    • In eight hours:

    The nicotine and carbon monoxide levels in your blood reduce by half. Carbon monoxide is the same fume pumped out by a car exhaust! In high doses it can be fatal, but at low levels - such as those found in cigarettes - it causes shortness of breath and increased heart rate. Your oxygen levels will also have returned to normal, helping replenish dried-out skin and hair caused by smoking.

    • In 24 hours:

    Carbon monoxide will be completely eliminated from your body and your lungs will start to clear out excess mucus and any other smoking 'debris'. You may notice you have a cough or sore throat as new lung tissue starts to grow.

    • In 48 hours:

    There is no nicotine left in your system and your sense of taste and smell will also greatly improve. One side-effect you may experience within the first 48 hours is light-headedness as the carbon monoxide leaves your system. But your pockets should feel heavier as you begin to save the money you would have spent on cigarettes!

    • In three days:

    Your breathing will become easier as the bronchial tubes in your lungs begin to relax. Your concentration may be starting to waver as the withdrawal symptoms from the nicotine kick in, but your energy levels will start to increase, giving you a boost.

    • In two to 12 weeks:

    You may find that you are getting more irritable, restless and depressed around this time as part of the withdrawal process. Up to 60 per cent of quitters said they suffered from these side-effects within four weeks of giving up smoking. Your craving to have another cigarette will be particularly strong at this point, but don't give in. By now your circulation has already greatly improved, boosting the nutrients being delivered to your skin which helps to beat wrinkles.

    • Within three to nine months:

    Your lung function will improve by up to 10 per cent as new cells lining the lungs develop. This will help any coughs, wheezes and breathing problems you had whilst smoking.

  • Hiya Rochelle, unfortunately breathing problems whilst under anaesthetic is a rare but known risk when undergoing surgery whether you're a smoker or not. That's why you have to sign consent. Obviously this risk would have been way higher if she were still a smoker but I don't think the fact she had been an ex-smoker would have increased her risk after 30 years.

    Lisa x

    Thank you, I didn't know this as never had an operation. I think she will find it good to know that the breathing problems wernt caused by being an ex smoker.

    I realise that the conversation has taken on a specific slant but regarding the above selected comment please see the following which has been copied off the web.

    • In 20 minutes:

    Your blood pressure and heart rate will return to normal. This immediately lowers your risk of having a heart attack. Your circulation will also improve, bringing fresh blood to your fingers and toes, so they may start to tingle.

    • In eight hours:

    The nicotine and carbon monoxide levels in your blood reduce by half. Carbon monoxide is the same fume pumped out by a car exhaust! In high doses it can be fatal, but at low levels - such as those found in cigarettes - it causes shortness of breath and increased heart rate. Your oxygen levels will also have returned to normal, helping replenish dried-out skin and hair caused by smoking.

    • In 24 hours:

    Carbon monoxide will be completely eliminated from your body and your lungs will start to clear out excess mucus and any other smoking 'debris'. You may notice you have a cough or sore throat as new lung tissue starts to grow.

    • In 48 hours:

    There is no nicotine left in your system and your sense of taste and smell will also greatly improve. One side-effect you may experience within the first 48 hours is light-headedness as the carbon monoxide leaves your system. But your pockets should feel heavier as you begin to save the money you would have spent on cigarettes!

    • In three days:

    Your breathing will become easier as the bronchial tubes in your lungs begin to relax. Your concentration may be starting to waver as the withdrawal symptoms from the nicotine kick in, but your energy levels will start to increase, giving you a boost.

    • In two to 12 weeks:

    You may find that you are getting more irritable, restless and depressed around this time as part of the withdrawal process. Up to 60 per cent of quitters said they suffered from these side-effects within four weeks of giving up smoking. Your craving to have another cigarette will be particularly strong at this point, but don't give in. By now your circulation has already greatly improved, boosting the nutrients being delivered to your skin which helps to beat wrinkles.

    • Within three to nine months:

    Your lung function will improve by up to 10 per cent as new cells lining the lungs develop. This will help any coughs, wheezes and breathing problems you had whilst smoking.

    Thanks, I have read all these before :) it is interesting to know what immediate effects stopping has on your body isn't it? The body is an amazing thing

  • and dont forget the osteoporosis that you might not get after quitting smoking

    mx.

  • I noticed my back is starting to slope sideways since I stopped. Went to the docs and he said its typical for a quitter and its called - extramoneyinyapocket, or fatwallet for short. :D

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