Day Zero

There isn't a day zero section, so hopefully it's ok to post this here ;)

I called my gf earlier today and she told me that she hadn't managed to go more than about six hours waking time without a cigarette, despite her resolve to give up (I'm not at all pushing her into this). Voices in her head had very quickly started telling her that everything she had thought about and decided over the past few weeks in a perfectly logical manner was irrelevant, and that she should really just have another smoke. After all, there's still time to quit later... etc.

Of course, she felt terribly guilty about having quit quitting after only a few hours. We discussed it at length and concluded that the experience could only serve to help her to understand what went wrong and make her stronger for the next attempt. Still, I was somewhat surprised that the Nicomonster had managed to twist her mind in such a short period of time.

I'm wondering from other people's perpectives if they have been through this extremely short quitting period (less waking time than one typically sleeps at night)? Any insight into what happened, why you think it happened, and tips to get over that 1st day would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Michael.

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  • There isn't a day zero section, so hopefully it's ok to post this here ;)

    I called my gf earlier today and she told me that she hadn't managed to go more than about six hours waking time without a cigarette, despite her resolve to give up (I'm not at all pushing her into this). Voices in her head had very quickly started telling her that everything she had thought about and decided over the past few weeks in a perfectly logical manner was irrelevant, and that she should really just have another smoke. After all, there's still time to quit later... etc.

    Of course, she felt terribly guilty about having quit quitting after only a few hours. We discussed it at length and concluded that the experience could only serve to help her to understand what went wrong and make her stronger for the next attempt. Still, I was somewhat surprised that the Nicomonster had managed to twist her mind in such a short period of time.

    I'm wondering from other people's perpectives if they have been through this extremely short quitting period (less waking time than one typically sleeps at night)? Any insight into what happened, why you think it happened, and tips to get over that 1st day would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks,

    Michael.

    Just remember Michael everyones differrent she still has the urge to smoke, sounds like she feels a little restless, irritable, frustrated or tired; some people also find that they have difficulty sleeping or concentrating.

    Try and get her to stay focussed on the positive effects of stopping smoking like the amount of money she will save, no cigarette smells and the improvements to her health. Maybe get her to take long, deep breaths when she is experiencing an intense craving avoid tea, coffee and alcohol during the first few days of stopping smoking.

    If she starts again, don't worry. she hasn't failed. she has improved her chance of success next time. It takes most people four or five attempts before they go smokefree for good.

    keep giving her the support and encouragement get her to join up on the forum that will help her too ..good luck and keep us posted..

  • I've always had this problem when giving up, I've prob tried about 15 - 20 times and never usually get past lunchtime on the first day, whether it's been with NRT, or CT or Alan Carr's Easyway.

    I'm now on day 6 (early days i know) with the aid of Champix, it's been a godsend to me and also the weekly visits to the Quit Nurse really really help, and being on hear and reading about other people really really helps too

    she's gonna have to find her own way with this tho, It's the only way!!

  • Whenever she's really truly ready is the right time and when she's had time to prepare and psyche up to it.

    I went through the most of this year thinking on a Sunday night, i will quit tomorrow, smoking all my fags, going to bed determined and then Monday morning would come and would be off up the shop for some fags by 10.00am.

    I kid you not i must have done this at least 20 times this year.

    It was only when i gave myself some more time, and went to see the quit nurse and has a Carbon monoxide reading of 60 (that's 10%) that it really hit home. and she was able to help me come up with a plan, fix a date and just being there.

  • she hasn't failed. she has improved her chance of success next time. It takes most people four or five attempts before they go smokefree for good...

    I agree. Every attempt is valuable.

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