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How Do We Define Cure of Diabetes?

How Do We Define Cure of Diabetes?

Here is link

care.diabetesjournals.org/c...

Which says....

.........consensus group comprised of experts in pediatric and adult endocrinology, diabetes education, transplantation, metabolism, bariatric/metabolic surgery, and (for another perspective) hematology-oncology met in June 2009 to discuss these issues.

..........For a chronic illness such as diabetes, it may be more accurate to use the term remission than cure. Current or potential future therapies for type 1 or type 2 diabetes will likely always leave patients at risk for relapse, given underlying pathophysiologic abnormalities and/or genetic predisposition. However, terminology such as “prolonged remission” is probably less satisfactory to patients than use of the more hopeful and definitive term “cure” after some period of time has elapsed. Additionally, if cure means remission that lasts for a lifetime, then by definition a patient could never be considered cured while still alive. Hence, it may make sense operationally to consider prolonged remission of diabetes essentially equivalent to cure. This is analogous to certain cancers, where cure is defined as complete remission of sufficient duration that the future risk of recurrence is felt to be very low.

.........Partial remission is sub-diabetic hyperglycemia (A1C not diagnostic of diabetes [<6.5%], fasting glucose 100–125 mg/dl [5.6–6.9 mmol/l]) of at least 1 year's duration in the absence of active pharmacologic therapy or ongoing procedures.

Complete remission is a return to “normal” measures of glucose metabolism (A1C in the normal range, fasting glucose <100 mg/dl [5.6 mmol/l]) of at least 1 year's duration in the absence of active pharmacologic therapy or ongoing procedures.

3 Replies
oldestnewest

yeah, i have seen this in my other family members who are not diabetics, they never go beyond 120-130 during OGTT while me and my mother go high level all the way

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@ anup

Complete remission is a return to “normal” measures of glucose metabolism (A1C in the normal range, fasting glucose <100 mg/dl [5.6 mmol/l]) of at least 1 year's duration in the absence of active pharmacologic therapy or ongoing procedures.

if we go by this definition can u claim 'Complete Remission' ???? I guess your FBS is below 90 all the time....and A1c is 5.5 for last 5 years without medicine???

May u can claim prolonged remission???

ShooterGeorge

also you may claim for prolonged remission???

What is your current status????

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Most of of the time my fasting is in between 90-95 and since last 2 1/2 Hba1c is 5.3-5.8 without any medicines. But I will not say complete remission as I do spike after meals when I take more carbs than my tolerance.

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