Couch to 5K
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Struggling a little

So in the two weeks since graduation I have tried to work on speed. Today, for example, I ran 1km at 7.5km/hr, which is not super speedy, but much faster than anything I achieved before. The problem is that I can’t keep it up for 30 minutes :( so I end up switching to walking after 20 minutes or so of running, which feels like regression to me!

Any thoughts or advice?

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You might look at intervals as a way of bumping your average speed up.

The idea is to do repeated sets of a steady / normal pace / fast pace section.

Here's an example of a 30-20-10 interval programme:

crankyfitness.com/2013/10/1...

More generally, you might build faster sections into your regular runs. The idea is not to do all or nothing, but rather get used to faster bits, with slower recovery sections to compensate. Over time, you will get used to a faster pace.

The other thing to focus on is technique. You might benefit from attending a beginners running club if there is one as there are ways of improving the efficiency of your running and gaining a speed boost without actually having to increase effort dramatically.

Finally, its important to remember that speed isn't everything. Be realistic about what you're trying to achieve and don't fall into the trap of pushing too hard and spending time on the Injury Couch (IC) as a result.

Good luck!

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Thanks! I’ll try the intervals

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The advice that I have gleaned from this forum is to keep it slow and steady. I graduated at the end of August and I can run for more than 30 mins comfortably - but that is because I have really slowed it down. When you're new to running you need to build stamina and your body needs to get used to you being a runner - this all takes time. Good luck!

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I would spend 3-6 weeks at least just running for 30mins at a nice comfortable rate, to consolidate your running first.

Then I would introduce one run a week as a faster run. just from consolidating your runs over a few weeks you will find your speed will have improved on your faster runs already. THen perhaps try intervals, as has been suggested by Midriff_Crisis

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Forget speed... just keep consolidating the 30 minute runs... try shorter and longer just see where you get to runs... try the C25K + podcasts too maybe..., they can help with the different disciplines in our running, and are great fun.

The more runs you do, you find strength and stamina increase and your runs evolve... exercise for strength and stamina is important even more now on rest days.. to keep the rest of you in tune with those new running legs :)

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Doesn't matter! Slow, fast, it's very early days for you, just keep at it, keep chipping away.

I do slow runs upto 30mins, then I may walk for 20-30 secs then jog on slowly again reaching 5k. I don't put a must do to it, just do it in bits n pieces in my mind...

You will get there in time as you become fitter...

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Listen to the mentors on this site. I have looked up some of the links they posted in the past about the benefits of slower running. The slower pace should be your main training pace. You can't suddenly up the ante and expect to maintain it for the whole distance. There is much more involved than just your aerobic capacity.

If you've been using the app try having a look at the podcast instead. I'm using the C25K+ Stepping Stone podcast. It starts at 150 bpm which is hard to get to grips with. It took me three runs to feel comfortable with it. It's very good for improving technique though.

If you feel you've regressed a bit I've just got home from having my appendix out. I'm feeling quite a bit regressed myself.

Edit. Oh, and there's nothing wrong with walk/run training. Lots of people get faster actual race time doing it that way. The trick is to plan your walk/run intervals from the start. It's a good way to run at your 7.5 km/hr

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Yes. Rome wasn’t built in a day. Get stronger by SLOW running Run slower and you don’t get knackered. If you do get out of puff, STOP to get your breathing back to normal then press on. There is absolutely nothing wrong with taking a walk break. It will save your ass on numerous occasions

Have fun 😃👍

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Pros train with only 20% of their running being speed work. The rest of the time is easy pace, building and adapting your body. You can spread that out over different runs or you can do intervals, as suggested, but do not keep pushing all the time, it will be counter productive.

Fartleks, if you will excuse me, might be a fun way to approach this. I will let you do the searching.

For me, speed increased, along with the ability to sustain it, by increasing the distance that I ran, for one run per week.

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Excused ! 🤣🤣🤣🏃🏻

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At 2 weeks postgrad, I would just concentrate on consolidating your running ; 30 minutes 3 times a week. To increase speed after that, I would recommend interval training.

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