Bridge to 10K

Running on consecutive days

I hope to mine the deep vein of graduate knowledge and experience. I started C25K in April and graduated in July. I have been a good girl; following the rules and being sensible. Over the summer/autumn I managed to run 2 or 3 times a week, gradually increasing distance and then working on speed (well 'speed' is probably not the right word). Lovely :)

So the past couple of weeks has been very difficult. Work commitments plus weather/lack of light has made it challenging to find the time to run. Building rest days into the schedule has added to the logistical problems. I have run twice in the last fortnight (well, until today). So my question is, am I far enough down the line to occasionally run on consecutive days? I don't mean a massive streak or even doing it too often. But this week I had the opportunity to run yesterday (did 5k) and again today (did just 2k), I will be able to run again on Thursday (5k planned). Obviously I don't want to be injured but equally I don't want to lose momentum (and consequently motivation). I run very slowly and am careful. What do you think?

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I think an occasional consecutive run is OK as long as you are careful not to overdo it. Obviously in an ideal world you would space them out evenly through the week but who lives in that world? As I said just be careful not to overdo it, it is easy to overtrain and that can be a problem :)

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I'm thinking over training is not likely to be a problem here!

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Mmm its all down to the individual. I do not think i could manage consecutive days running but I am 60+ and carry too much weight and spent many years with very little exercise. I need to be mindful of these things.

You however are much younger, lighter, fitter. You have steadfastly built those running legs.

If you have no injuries your next logical step would be to try running 4 times a week. That requires you to run consecutive days sometimes. Obviously you would be mindful of milage etc.

So i would say try it, listen to your body and see how it goes.

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Thanks Millsie . Great advice as always. Of course I make my own decisions about my plan but I really appreciate the knowledge and experience here x

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You'll be fine to run on consecutive days.

Your body is conditioned for running: you've strengthened up your legs, your ligaments are adapted to running, and you have both the stamina and endurance. Don't overdo it, and you may feel a bit tired on the second day. But (as my 60km per week running colleague tells me) running on tired legs is good for them.

"Always take your rest days" is compulsory for folks new to C25K, but (as ju-ju proves) running on consecutive days is allowed for experienced runners.

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That’s great advice. If I meet some ‘experienced runners’ I’ll be sure to mention it 🏃🏾‍♀️😁. Appreciate you taking the time MarkyD

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You're welcome :-)

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My HM plan has me running some consecutive days. One really slow and short followed by a longer, pacier run. I think it's to allow me to get used to running a bit fatigued from the run the day before, but gentler than getting me to do it all on the one run, on one day.

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Helpful advice. So running on tired legs is a good thing sometimes! I know so little😂my legs were tired today

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This is a really useful post! I'm nowhere near ready for it, but it's good to know in 6 months, the occasional consecutive run day won't have me chased away from the forum with pitch forks 😂

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😂

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hi lovely i think you will be fine , my plan for the half marathon has me running tues thurs sat and sunday long run , ive been fine with consecutive days running but i do need my rest days too , im also not fast so dont think ill be putting too much on my old legs lol xx

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Thanks mate. Good to hear from a C25k peer. I don’t have the lofty aspirations of an HM (well done you!) but want to run happy and safe!

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dont think ive ever run happy lol , ive certainly finished happy tho !!! X

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The official party line is never to run on consecutive days or at least not for a year (or is it two?) or you will DIE and all your relatives will be hunted down and your lands sown with salt. Woe betide she who runs on consecutive days for that way the dread OVERTRAINING lies.

In another galaxy far away, populated by runners and gym goers and other mythical beasts of all ages who are clearly reckless with their health, training on consecutive days is an everyday (see what I did there?) occurence. Runners, swimmers, weightlifters, crossfitters, physical exerters of all varieties, even cyclists (hack, ptoo!) regularly train six days a week with no ill effect. They tend to vary the type and intensity and duration of their sessions from day to day, but do not have to have full days off between every one. I would say the majority of marathon training plans are based on a 5 day or even six day schedule, which really isn't possible to fit into a week without consecutive days.

And overtraining?

You are not overtraining. I am not overtraining. No one I know is overtraining and I know a lot of people who are doing 3 hours a day every day. Overtraining is one of those words that has been seized upon and is bandied around with great impunity when what people actually mean is "done a little more than I am used to." Overtraining syndrome really only kicks in when people are doing elite level volumes of work.

Observing the 10 per cent rule (most of the time, that isnt written in stone either) is wise but if you want to split up your weekly volume into more days, by this stage it is not going to harm you at all, and your Great Aunt Mildred is not going to be garotted in an alleyway by the Mano Negra.

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Ha ha. I hadn’t considered the complete destruction of the Wheels dynasty (something else to keep me awake at night) but appreciate the advice. Squats helping too!

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I am working on a post for the FAQs about post C25k running and mention this question. The best article I have found about this subject is this runnersworld.com/for-beginn... which suggests that you should wait until you have been running at least six months, but then only if you have been doing plenty of aerobic strengthening work on non run days and it also states that the over 40s need to take extra care before increasing training load.

The golden rule is never to follow a hard run with a hard run, so don't follow your long run with a 2k interval session. Occasional consecutive days running after all the above has been taken into consideration, will probably be fine, but we nearly all feel fine before we get injured, so caution is of course necessary.

Knowing how many people get injured training for marathons and even half marathons, I would say that some of the training plans are best suited to those who have been running regularly for a couple of years or more, especially in respect of consecutive days running.

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Thanks for the very sound advice Iannoda. I ran very carefully today and I am not training for anything except trying to live longer/better. I’ll have a look at the article. Cheers

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Should you always buffer the runs with a relaxing one, even if you e had a rest day in between? For,example, If I do a longer run, must I follow it with a shorter, more relaxed run, then an intervals run, then another shorter relaxing run, even if each run was followed by a rest day. Sorry, that sounds complicated.

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I think that sounds like you might do les each run and end up back on the couch! It is good practice , even if you are having a rest day, to not follow a hard run with a hard run, but common sense will tell you what, in your terms is hard

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Thanks, understood. i will do a shorter more relaxed run either side of long or intervals runs.

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I think that you should take a nice, relaxed approach to running. Albeit I am probably too conservative but I would hate you to burn out. Chill

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I won't. that's why I'm asking :) x

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Interesting question and replies.

I started a 4-days a week plan a few weeks ago so inevitably have to do some consecutive days. And, turn away the faint hearted, I have been known to accompany a C25ker in my lunch break and then do a "me" run when I get home.

I never do two tough runs in a day or on consecutive days and always try to have a rest day after a long run (8-10k).

So far my body has been surprisingly robust but I am being careful to watch for niggles.

It sounds like you have been very sensible and built up gradually so like others I imagine you could sneak in the odd consecutive day with no ill effects.

Let us know how you get on :-)

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Thanks L-L. Realising that I am possibly too rule bound!

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Rules are there for breaking and so that others can say "We told you so" should it go pear shaped.

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Don't fret - I am too. Such a law abiding citizen it infuriates those around me. I am the only person in the country who reads flat pack instructions and those leaflets that come with medicines. Surprised I don't have a bad neck from looking over my shoulder all the time on a Consecutive Day Run for the expert coming after me telling me I have violated the Running Rules! Not been arrested yet...

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Two on the same day!!! *purses lips and clasps handbag*

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I’ve sometimes done a gentle parkrun on a Saturday and then my long run on a Sunday as part of my HM training with no adverse effects. I don’t make a habit of it and I certainly wouldn’t ‘race’ parkrun if I was running the next day. I also don’t try anything else ‘new’ or ‘different’ if I’ve run on consecutive days e.g. hill reps or adding distance to my long run.

I’m still pretty certain that the best advice is to take your rest days - but now and then I can’t resist breaking the rules! The most important thing is to listen to your body and if in doubt, stop. Good luck! x

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Thanks Gabby. My goals are modest but appreciate your experience. Good luck with the training🏃🏾‍♀️👍😁🥖

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Like Gabby, I do park run Saturdays and a long run Sundays. Treadmill or a class in the week as I find it hard to fit it in. Listen to your body!

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It’s really helpful to know about this. With the forum as my main (?only) influence I have perhaps been too cautious. However it’s given me a really solid foundation. Good luck with your training🏃🏾‍♀️🥖👍

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As I was redoing my c25k for the second time. I ran some of the early runs 1 in the morning and 1 in the afternoon. It was my call and I listened to my body and if my leg had fallen off at the end of the day I'd blame only me.

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Ha. I hope your legs remain attached 👍🏃🏾‍♀️😁

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This post has been really useful! I have been in a bit of a dilemma too! (I’m a bit of a rule follower!!) After graduating almost 2 months ago I was going out 3 days Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday! I swim on Wednesday which I can’t change! Anyway I started meeting up with a wee group of runners on a Monday evening so thought oh no I can’t run on Sundays now!! But now I think I can be more relaxed about it and as long as I’m sensible it should be ok! 😀

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Take your time Sarakc , you are a fairly new graduate and runner. Maybe get a few more miles under your belt before you expect more of yourself.

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Hi! Thank you! I will be careful! I work on a Saturday too (early start in a busy bakery) Last couple of weeks I’ve gone out after work but find my feet hurt after being in my safety shoes all day!! I’m off this Saturday so I might do a Park Run! 😀

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Just go run, If it hurts stop.

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The trouble is it doesn’t hurt when you run. It’s afterwards you notice any injuries (well it is with me anyway!).

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Interesting post and replies especially since I am on the injury couch! 😕

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Oh No! What has happened?

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Not sure maybe overdid it or possibly went 'over' on it but don't remember a particular incident. It aches/hurts by ankle bone after walking, jogging or driving - tendon strain I suppose but haven't bothered with doc since they say '6 weeks rest!' before looking into things further. 🙁

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I am really sorry to hear this, take it easy. Have you thought about a sports physio rather than the GP?

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