If you have hypothyroidism should you avoid using soya and soya based products? What is your opinion?

I've read that soya and products with soya in them can cause further problems to thyroid function. I have actually seen the word 'toxic' used to describe the effect soya has on the thyroid, and that soya will destroy what activity is left. Some people who are lactose intolerant are using soya milk - surely there are other milks available instead of soya.

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  • I personally avoid soya where possible, I have a noticibly restricted throat if I take soya based foods, as far as milk goes, I seldom use any, I am lactose intolerant have avoided milk products for years, now you can buy ARLA which is lactose free and almost the same taste as normal. I use this occassionally and am fine with it, I just dont tend to have it often as I was so long without milk I dont really miss it. I prefer my coffee black anyway!

  • Thank you. I have felt noticably better since not using soya - but have been surprised to see it referred to on here as something others take, so was a bit confused!

  • The effects of soya are more complicated than some other foods.

    Soy affects absorption, the functioning of thyroid peroxidase and the recycling of thyroid hormone between liver and gut. It might also have other effects.

    My view is that it is probably best to avoid - that's easiest. But if you have a modest, regular intake, then you are possibly already compensating for its impact - so might be better to carry on.

    Soy lecithin, widely used in many, many products, is usually not thought to have any such impact. It is a highly purified derivative of soy.

  • I have a soya yoghurt most evenings. Dr myhill said soyas ok to have and dr p hadn't suggested I avoid it. One of those tough ones to know what to do with isn't it :0/ been told no dairy so.....

  • I agree - it is a difficult area. I think there are several possible problems such as:

    If you sometimes do, sometimes don't, then you might have erratic thyroid hormones.

    If you consume large amounts of soy it is probably not a good idea. (We in the West, or at least some of us, seem to consume far more than those in its traditional areas such as China.) Lots of people miss things like most UK bread now having soy flour in it.

    Anyway, some light reading:

    thyroidmanager.org/chapter/...

    thyroidmanager.org/chapter/...

    thyroidmanager.org/chapter/...

    Rod

  • Rod, if you read or take information from various experts you would end up having virtually nothing to eat!

    I've gone organic recently, which I believe in, and I've cut down grains. I've started eating meat again (on advise from doctor) and only have a couple of treat meals a week. No more fruit in the mornings. Can I really no enjoy my evening soya yoghurt?! Lol

    Si

  • Thank you. I wasn't clear on why soy kept coming up as something not to eat - but so many places said don't! I was eating a lot as a vegetarian and it was a good source of protein. I gave it up two months ago and now avoid it. I have had a surge of feeling better since giving it up and have found I can replace without difficulty. As with everything - it's what works for us.

  • Have you tried goats bio yoghurt Sporty. Why soya when there are alternatives?

  • I avoid soya because it's phyto oestrogenic and I have a history of fibroids, which i personally believe were and are caused by mismanagement of my thyroid disease

  • I agree to stay away from soy. I discovered when I was going gluten-free that often the replacement for wheat flour was rice flour along with soy flour. When I ate that, I had difficulty if I were exerting myself later. It didn't become noticeable until I started playing sports.

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