Stomach motility: I seem to be having gastric... - Thyroid UK

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Stomach motility

Gillybabe48
Gillybabe48
30 Replies

I seem to be having gastric emptying problems. Is this thyroid related. My last tests showed TSH 0.07 T4 17.6 and T3 5.9. Ranges are TSH 0.35 - 5 and T4 7.50 - 20 and T3 3 - 6.5. So cannot see how this could be underactive thyroid. A bit mystified by this.

30 Replies
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greygoose

You probably have low stomach acid - which is hypo-related. Try the home test at the end of this article:

healthygut.com/articles/3-t...

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Gillybabe48

But my levels are optimum. With TSH 0.07 T4 17.6 and T3 5.1. I feel hyper rather than hypo.

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greygoose

Who said they were optimal? If you don't feel well, they aren't optimal. Optimal is a feeling, not a number. You haven't given ranges but those numbers look as if they're only just over mid-range, which wouldn't be optimal for most hypos.

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Gillybabe48

TSH ranges 0.36-5.0 T4 7.50-20 T3 3.69-6.0

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greygoose

OK, but I repeat my question: why do you think your results are optimal?

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Gillybabe48

Because 0.07 TSH is low 17.6 top range 5.1 is top end T3. I feel energetic and concentration better than it ever has been. Always warm when before I was cold with cold chills. It is just the stomach causing problems. I do suffer with IBS. The hospital said they were optimal and although TSH at 0.07 they did not drop my dose down from 100 mgs.

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greygoose

It's good that you're feeling good apart from the gut. But I still have to say that it's just a coincidence that that coincided with low FSH and Frees at the top of the range. Other people with those same numbers might not feel so good because those numbers wouldn't be right for them. Optimal is not a number, it's how you feel.

But, sounds as if there's still room for improvement if you still have IBS. That's not a disease, it's a hypo symptoms. As for the hospital, what would they know? They're not inside your body. :)

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Gillybabe48

I have had IBS since a young woman. But only hypothyroid for 10 years.

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greygoose

10 years that you know of. Hypothyroidism starts causing symptoms long before it shows up in the blood.

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Gillybabe48

I was tested after my daughter was born in my twenties as the Doctor thought I had an overactive thyroid because I was losing weight, had popping eyes and was anxious. So maybe it was going wrong then!!!!! He said at the time all the tests were okay. But it was 1975!!??

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greygoose

Thyroids often start to go wrong after childbirth. Do you have Hashi's? If so, the tests could have been ok at the point they were tested. But, that doesn't mean they were ok the week before nor the month after. Levels tend to jump around with Hashi's.

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Gillybabe48

Thanks for info. It is a minefield. My mum had it and my sister too. Just hope my family do not have it. Would not wish this on anybody. Puts marriage under strain too. I am sure my hubby is fed up with it too,!!?!??

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greygoose

Most of the females and some of the males had it in my family - on both sides! I think my daughter will probably develop it one day - if she hasn't already, but she won't get tested! And I'm certain my eldest granddaughter has. :(

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Gillybabe48

Oh dear. Not good is it.

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greygoose

No, it isn't.

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Gillybabe48

What dosage are you on? and what are your levels and ranges? If you do not mind me asking.

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greygoose

I'm on 75 mcg T3 only, but I haven't had a blood test since 2014. I self-treat.

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Gillybabe48

When I saw endo at hospital she offered me thyroninine which I believe is T3 with levothyroxine. She was very helpful.

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greygoose

Liothyronine is T3, yes. Why did she offer you that?

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Gillybabe48

Because when I was first diagnosed could not tolerate levothyroxine even at a low dose. So she said to try thyroninine. Which did not work either. So for a couple of years they left it until my thyroid had clearly gone right off the scale at TSH 30 and then my body seemed ready for it. At a very low dose first with gradual increase. Now I am on 100 mgs.

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greygoose

Ah, OK. Very unusual to find a doctor that will do that.

Anyway, to get back to your original questions. It could be that you're one of these people - like me - that need a higher level of FT3 - slightly over-range. But, even optimising your levels might not bring instant relief. So things take longer to sort themselves out than other.

You didn't actually give your B12 level to SlowDragon when she asked, you just said 'normal', which is meaningless. We always need to see the numbers: results and ranges. But, if your B12 is too low - even if it's in-range - it can also cause low stomach acid. So, can low salt consumption. So, two other things to look at there. :)

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SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator

When were vitamin D, folate, ferritin and B12 last tested?

These need to be optimal for good thyroid function

Low stomach acid can be an common issue

articles.mercola.com/sites/...

thyroidpharmacist.com/artic...

stopthethyroidmadness.com/s...

scdlifestyle.com/2012/03/3-...

naturalendocrinesolutions.c...

Thousands of posts on here about low stomach acid

healthunlocked.com/search/p...

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Gillybabe48

My B12 FERRITIN AND FOLATE WERE ALL NORMAL.

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SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator
in reply to Gillybabe48

There's a difference between normal and optimal

Vitamin results are "normal" if within range.

B12 Range is typically 210-750. A result of 212 or 748 are both normal. But with thyroid disease we often need B12 at least over 500

Ferritin, at least half way through range

Folate at least over ten

Vitamin D at least around 80nmol and around 100nmol may be better

Do you have the actual results and ranges?

Couldn't see any of these results in previous posts

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SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator

Are you on strictly gluten free diet?

Or tried it?

While still eating high gluten diet ask GP for coeliac blood test first or buy test online for under £20, just to rule it out first

Assuming test is negative you can immediately go on strictly gluten free diet

(If test is positive you will need to remain on high gluten diet until endoscopy, maximum 6 weeks wait officially)

Trying gluten free diet for 3-6 months. If no noticeable improvement then reintroduce gluten and see if symptoms get worse

chriskresser.com/the-gluten...

amymyersmd.com/2018/04/3-re...

thyroidpharmacist.com/artic...

scdlifestyle.com/2014/08/th...

drknews.com/changing-your-d...

Non Coeliac Gluten sensitivity (NCGS) and autoimmune disease

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/296...

The predominance of Hashimoto thyroiditis represents an interesting finding, since it has been indirectly confirmed by an Italian study, showing that autoimmune thyroid disease is a risk factor for the evolution towards NCGS in a group of patients with minimal duodenal inflammation. On these bases, an autoimmune stigma in NCGS is strongly supported

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/300...

The obtained results suggest that the gluten-free diet may bring clinical benefits to women with autoimmune thyroid disease

nuclmed.gr/wp/wp-content/up...

In summary, whereas it is not yet clear whether a gluten free diet can prevent autoimmune diseases, it is worth mentioning that HT patients with or without CD benefit from a diet low in gluten as far as the progression and the potential disease complications are concerned

restartmed.com/hashimotos-g...

Despite the fact that 5-10% of patients have Celiac disease, in my experience and in the experience of many other physicians, at least 80% + of patients with Hashimoto's who go gluten-free notice a reduction in their symptoms almost immediately.

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Gillybabe48

I had celiac test. It was normal but still trying to go gluten free.

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SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator
in reply to Gillybabe48

It does have to be strictly gluten free to be effective

You can't be almost gluten free, as explained here

chriskresser.com/the-gluten...

Watch out for cross contamination. Don't share butter, jam, separate toaster for gluten free bread, separate chopping board etc

Trying absolutely strictly gluten free diet for 3-6 months. If it helps, as it does for very high percentage of Hashimoto's patients, then sticking on it long term

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Mickeydooley

I had ibs-d ever since I started to take

Levo in 2007. (I had the opposite problem prior to taking levo). I’m so much better now that I’ve begun a protocol advised by a naturopathic doctor with nearly 40 years experience treating

Thyroid patients. It aims at supporting the gut function.

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SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator
in reply to Mickeydooley

Gluten intolerance often starts or gets a lot worse as soon as we start on Levothyroxine

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Gillybabe48

Thank you for that information.

1 like
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