Has anyone tried making their own thyroid hormo... - Thyroid UK

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Has anyone tried making their own thyroid hormones?

Terra_ist
Terra_ist
12 Replies

I've just started my journey with trying to understand this stuff and I wondered if it were possible make my own hormones from an animal thyroid from the butcher. I looked it up and it seems that's what used to be done before industrialised medicine. Has anyone tried it? Is it better to use a sheep or a pig? I'm a bit worried about parasites from raw pig.

The reason I'm considering this is that the Drs won't prescribe anything except antidepressants with my test results (elevated TSH, 'normal' free T4, antibody positive). They just want to wait and retest every 6 months presumably till I develop Hashimoto's. But I've been sitting on my couch struggling to do anything for the last 2 years. I don't know that my symptoms are anything to do with my thyroid but I'd like to try it to see if I feel better. Also, I have read that treating at my stage prevents Hashimoto's, but that's not NICE guidelines.

Any thoughts? Thanks.

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Greybeard63

As I understand it slaughterhouses are required to remove thyroid glands to ensure they don't enter the food chain.

"QUOTE" The preservation of edible offal requires different conditions: -1°C rather than 0°C and a relative humidity close to saturation to avoid surface blemishes. Organs intended for therapeutic purposes, such as thyroid, pancreas, ovaries, pituitary and so on, must be frozen immediately to preserve their active principles.

fao.org/3/t0098e/t0098e02.htm

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bantam12

This has come up before and the answer is no you can't make your own.

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MaisieGray

No you can't do that. Creating Natural Dessicated Thyroid (NDT) isnt just a case of eating another animal's thyroid, although when it was first considered, before a treatment for underactive thyroid was created, it was given in solution to people and was certainly better than nothing. But modern NDTs are combined with various excipients in exactly the same way that other drugs are, and more importantly, are tested and measured to achieve consistent levels of active ingredient - you have to know how much exogenous thyroid hormone you are consuming. Truly, if it was as easy as eating bovine or porcine thyroid gland, many many would be doing so.

The CKS NICE guidelines make it clear that Drs actually can initiate treatment in the case of subclinical hypothyroidism, so if you'd like to post your recent test results and their respective ranges, folks can advise. However, you really need to know what your FT3 level is, as that is the active hormone we need to be well/euthyroid, so it might be, that to make your case for treatment, you have to have more comprehensive testing carried out privately.

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helvella
helvellaAdministrator

There are, at present, NO NICE guidelines for hypothyroidism.

(There are Clinical Knowledge Summaries - CKS - which appear on the NICE website. They are a potted summary of current practice but have not been developed according the the strict and comprehensive rules required of formal NICE guidelines.)

Even if you had an unlimited supply of fresh animal thyroids, what would you do with them?

Let us assume the simplest possible approach. Mince and freeze. How would you dose? A teaspoonful every day? You have absolutely no idea how much thyroid hormone is present. It varies by species, by individual animal, by season.

(And that completely ignores the issues of disease transmission.)

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MaisieGray
MaisieGray
in reply to helvella

Mmm. Well that's exactly why I wrote it as CKS NICE guidelines because they are Clinical Knowledge Summaries made available to both clinicians and the public, on the website/under the banner, of NICE, for the purpose of "Providing primary care practitioners with a readily accessible summary of the current evidence base, and practical guidance on best practice". If best practice and current evidence base can't, in normal-speak, be interpreted as guidance, I don't know what can; and if it isn't validated by NICE then it either shouldn't be presented on the NICE website, under the banner of NICE, or it should have a disclaimer to the effect that "this is not validated nor supported by NICE", which it doesn't. On the contrary, the guidance on CKS is:

Developed on behalf of NICE

-CKS topics are developed by Clarity Informatics Ltd but commissioned and funded by NICE.

- Topics are written by an expert multidisciplinary team with experience of primary care, supported by a network of over 6000 specialist external reviewers.

- The development process is accredited by NICE to ensure the highest quality.

So whilst this evidence base and best practise wasn't born with the specific intention of being 'NICE Guidelines', with a capital 'G', it it is accepted as valid guidance in the interregnum, whilst we wait for the 'real' NICE Guidelines.

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helvella
helvellaAdministrator
in reply to MaisieGray

I really don't think that the CKS should be presented as they are.

Full NICE guidelines are developed under procedures which have themselves been formally agreed. Whether we like the way they operate or not, we do see the processes occurring. We were, to some extent, invited to contribute to the guidelines currently being developed. There are real, named people responsible.

Further, there is an expectation the full NICE guidelines will effectively be trumps. Whereas CKS can be ignored or sidelined by "local" variations.

I note the following.

The CKS for Hypothyroidism references:

Association for Clinical Biochemistry, British Thyroid Association, British Thyroid Foundation (2006) UK guidelines for the use of Thyroid Function Tests. British Thyroid Association.. ww.british-thyroid-association.org [Free Full-text]

This has several problems: The document itself says it should be reviewed after three years. Still being referenced thirteen years later is not acceptable. The link to the document is broken. There is no process for getting egregious errors corrected in that document. I know. I have tried.

And yes, it does link to ww.british-thyroid-association.org - which should, of course, be www.

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Angel_of_the_North

It's actually very hard to get animal thyroids as butchers don't get them (not legal), so it would have to be an animal you killed yourself (legally) . Then I think it would be very difficult to work out how much thyroid you needed to eat or liquidize and drink.

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Panda321

In the UK it is illegal to butcher your own pig. For many properties (including my house) it is not permitted to even own a pig.

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Angel_of_the_North

Absolutely, so you'd be stuck with rodent thyroids (or possibly fox)

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serenfach
serenfach
in reply to Panda321

You can legally butcher your own pig if it is for your own use. You do need a licenced person to actually slaugher the pig though, or a vet watching while you do the business. Slaughter houses remove the thyroid, and in over 500 pigs over the years I took to the slaughter house, I did not see one thyroid in the whole pigs I took home and cut up in a licenced butchery unit. I always looked in hope!

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SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator

Recommend you get FULL Thyroid and vitamin testing and come back here with new post once you get results

If you have high thyroid antibodies, raised TSH and symptoms then Levothyroxine should be prescribed as trial to see if it helps

For full Thyroid evaluation you need TSH, FT4 and FT3 plus both TPO and TG thyroid antibodies tested. Also EXTREMELY important to test vitamin D, folate, ferritin and B12

Low vitamin levels are extremely common, especially if Thyroid antibodies are raised

Recommended on here that all thyroid blood tests should ideally be done as early as possible in morning and fasting. This gives highest TSH, lowest FT4 and most consistent results. (Patient to patient tip, best not mentioned to GP or phlebotomist)

Is this how you do your tests?

Private tests are available. Thousands on here forced to do this as NHS often refuses to test FT3 or antibodies or all vitamins

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/testin...

Medichecks Thyroid plus ultra vitamin or Blue Horizon Thyroid plus eleven are the most popular choice. DIY finger prick test or option to pay extra for private blood draw. Both companies often have special offers, Medichecks usually have offers on Thursdays, Blue Horizon its more random

If antibodies are high this is Hashimoto's, (also known by medics here in UK more commonly as autoimmune thyroid disease).

About 90% of all primary hypothyroidism in Uk is due to Hashimoto's.

Low vitamins are especially common with Hashimoto's. Food intolerances are very common too, especially gluten.

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DippyDame

Surely achieving correct thyroid treatment is complex enough without considering the yuck factor of pig thyroid pate for lunch ....apart from the legal issues.

Fear not, there are better ways!

Post your latest results, with ref. ranges, (in a new post)and you will receive all the advice you need.

Elevated TSH suggests you need levothyroxine.

Normal FT4...more detail reqd.

You haven't mentioned FT3 ...

very important.

I wonder if you are not adequately converting T4 to T3...

T3 is the active thyroid hormone; it is required by trillions of cells in the body.

We cannot help much without seeing your lab numbers.

Low thyroid hormones can cause depression and anxiety but I doubt many medics are up to speed on hypo symptoms.

Come back with more details and members will point a way forward....see Slow dragon's reply here.

They did that for me.

Good luck.

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