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6wk blood test results - MediChecks

6wk blood test results - MediChecks

Hi all

Here is my up to date results from today.

I’ve been on levo 50mcg since 24th April. My TSH has reduced from my last bloods so it looks like the levo is working.

I have been taking selenium, zinc, B12 (sublingual), BetterYou B12 spray, Vit D & K2 spray, magnesium (transdermal) and Igennus B complex. I’ve just started gluten free too.

My questions are, the MediChecks doctor says my B12 is too high. Is it?

Also should I ask my GP for a levo increase? I feel a bit better since starting levo and taking my supplements but still having some Hashi flares at times.

Does my conversion look ok? I have Hashimoto’s.

Any help and insight would be greatly appreciated, as ever.

Thank you 😊

Lisa x

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What do you call a 'Hashi's flare'?

Your TSH is still too high, but your FT4 is also high. And that's because you don't convert very well. Continuing to increase the levo is not the answer. What you need is a little T3 added to your levo.

Your B12 is rather high. Try cutting down on the supplements. Probably all you need for a while is the B complex.

Your ferritin is a bit low, though.

As you have Hashi's, are you 100% gluten-free?

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Hi greygoose,

Hashi’s flare is when I feel like I’m swinging from hypo to hyper, some days this happens, where I’m so tired one day then hyper the next (I think it’s when my antibodies are being dumped into my thyroid, apparently it’s called a ‘flare’)

I’ve been gluten free for just under a week now, 100% committed to it though, as I’m veggie too I just needed to sort my head out with what I can eat or I would’ve started earlier.

I am going to ask the GP for T3 but I know what the answer will be (I’m in Scotland) so I will be looking for any info on sourcing it myself.

I’ll definitely cut down the B12, just use the B complex instead. X

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Um… No, the antibodies aren't dumped into your thyroid. A Hashi's flare is when the immune system launches an attack on the thyroid, and the dying cells dump their stock of hormone into the blood, causing the levels of FT4 and FT3 to rise sharply. Thus causing the TSH to drop. These levels then reduce by themselves, as the excess hormone is used up or excreted - and I think it's mainly excreted, because most people don't tend to have hyper symptoms. You then become hypo again. And, the best way to even out these swings, is to keep your TSH suppressed.

But, it's perfectly possible to have hypo and hyper symptoms at the same time.

So, it's too soon to know if the gluten-free is going to help. But, it does help a lot of people, in many ways. So, stick at it! :)

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Thank you! If anyone could message me with a source of T3 I’d be grateful :)

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I think you'll have to post a new question, asking just that. :)

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Testing B12 whilst supplementing is of little value. This is laid down in the Guidelines which are probably sitting on your GP's desk ! Only 20% of your B12 blood result is available to travel to your cells where it is needed ....

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I thought an active B12 test was alright when you were supplementing. No?

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The Active B12 test indicates the amount of bound B12 in the blood - that can later enter the cells. It still doesn't tell you what is in the cells. Raised Homocysteine and MMA can indicate Low B12 in the cells but rarely tested in the NHS. I have read that supplementing needs to be stopped 6 months prior to testing - as per the PAS Forum 😊

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Oh, well that's news. I'd always believed that an active B12 did tell you how much was in the cells, and that it was ok to do when supplementing. Well, you learn something new every day!

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Betty

I'm wondering why you were supplementing with sublingual B12 plus the B12 oral spray. Either one on it's own would have been enough.

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I have no idea Susie, lol! Probably just over eager ;)

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