Thyroid UK
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Hi new here endo says symptoms not thyroid

So what are they please?

TSH 6.32 (0.2 - 4.2)

FREE T4 13.9 (12 - 22)

FREE T3 3.5 (3.1 - 6.8)

Symptoms constipation, joint pain, dry skin, feeling cold, tiredness, weight gain, heavy periods, puffy eyes and feet, pins and needles

Taking 100mcg levo but felt better on more and with T3 added. Diagnosed 2011

Thank you

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The endo is talking sh*t.

You need a dose increase until your TSH is 1 or under, Free T4 is in the top quarter of the range and your free T3 is in the top third of the range.

Unfortunately you were able to ask the endo why an out of range TSH result is OK but you may be able to ask your GP. GPs can refuse to listen to specialists if they choose.

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The chances of you being adequately treated, with TSH above reference range, FT4 and FT3 just above the lower limit of normal, is extremely remote. Ideally with the ranges you show, you should have TSH below 1, FT3 in the upper third of its range and FT4 doesn't matter so much, though it ought to be higher than 13.9.

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Lianna11 Have you had thyroid antibodies tested? Were they high - Hashimoto's?

Have you had vitamins and minerals tested - Vit D, B12, Folate, Ferritin? Are you supplementing for any of them, if so what dose?

Have you had your T3 removed, if so why, who removed it - the same endo who prescribed it originally or a different endo?

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THYROID PEROXIDASE ANTIBODIES 474 (<34)

THYROGLOBULIN ANTIBODIES >1300 (<115)

Thank you

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THYROID PEROXIDASE ANTIBODIES 474 (<34)

THYROGLOBULIN ANTIBODIES >1300 (<115)

Your high antibodies mean that you are positive for autoimmune thyroid disease aka Hashimoto's which is where antibodies attack the thyroid and gradually destroy it. The antibody attacks cause fluctuations in symptoms and test results.

Most doctors think antibodies aren't important so dismiss them, and they don't seem to understand Hashi's and how it affects the patient. So you need to read and learn so you can help yourself here.

You can help reduce the antibodies by adopting a strict gluten free diet which has helped many members here. Gluten contains gliadin (a protein) which is thought to trigger autoimmune attacks so eliminating gluten can help reduce these attacks. You don't need to be gluten sensitive or have Coeliac disease for a gluten free diet to help. Supplementing with selenium l-selenomethionine 200mcg daily can also help reduce the antibodies, as can keeping TSH suppressed.

Gluten/thyroid connection: chriskresser.com/the-gluten...

stopthethyroidmadness.com/h...

stopthethyroidmadness.com/h...

hypothyroidmom.com/hashimot...

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/about_...

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Hashi's and gut/absorption problems go hand in hand and very often low nutrient levels are the result. This could be the cause of some of your symptoms. So what about

Have you had vitamins and minerals tested - Vit D, B12, Folate, Ferritin? Are you supplementing for any of them, if so what dose?

And

Have you had your T3 removed, if so why, who removed it - the same endo who prescribed it originally or a different endo?

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I will post vitamins now, I had T3 removed and it was removed by a different endo who said I had overactive thyroid

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I had T3 removed and it was removed by a different endo who said I had overactive thyroid

Without seeing those results that made your endo remove the T3, it's not possible to comment. But if your FT3 was in range then you weren't overmedicated. You can't suddenly have an overactive thyroid if you have been diagnosed with an underactive one, it's not possible, and if that's what your endo said then they're talking out of their *rse and know nothing about treating hypothyroidism.

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TSH 0.03 (0.2 - 4.2)

Free T4 21.3 (12 - 22)

Free T3 4.2 (3.1 - 6.8)

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No way were you 'overactive' or overmedicated.

Your TSH was suppressed and taking T3 can suppress TSH.

Your FT4 was within range.

Your FT3 was very low considering you were taking T3.

You should have had an increase in T3 to raise your FT3, then when retested check FT4 to see whether Levo needed reducing.

The endo is an ass and would be better off in a different job, he sure doesn't know much about treating hypothyroidism.

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They are - most probably - and endo is wrong (probably a diabetes specialist). You have over range TSH. On meds, your TSH should be under 1 or even suppressed so that your Free T4 and Free T3 are in the top quarters of their ranges, not at the bottom like yours. You need a dose increase. Your bloods say so. You also need optinal B12, folate and ferritin (and vitamin D) in order to use the thyroid hormones. Pins and needles is often a sign of low B12. So get those tested and post results in a new thread..

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