Is it just me?: Newly diagnosed with Hashimoto's... - Thyroid UK

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Is it just me?

klm1213
klm1213

Newly diagnosed with Hashimoto's. I feel like I'm fluctuating between hyper and hypo and even wake up in the morning with a pounding pulse. This is very scary to me and wondering if anyone else experience is this and how long it last?

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Hidden
Hidden

This article was a great help to me understanding some of my symptoms:

thyroidpharmacist.com/artic...

No, you are not alone. Over the years (diagnosed 17 years ago), I have had many confusing symptoms more commonly associated with hyperthyroidism than hypothyroidism.

One thing that has helped me has been to keep my TSH suppressed (<0.01). That freaks most doctors out, but I have noticed that it actually keeps my antibody levels in range. When I had a so called normal TSH, my antibody levels were much higher and I had more fluctuating symptoms.

klm1213
klm1213 in reply to Hidden

Thank you. This has all made me feel like I'm going insane! I'm tired, jittery, anxiety is through the roof, can't sleep, anxious and nervous & have no appetite. The fast pulse rate really freaks me out, which in turn makes all of my above symptoms worse. Hoping this goes away really soon. Thank you for your response :-)

Hidden
Hidden in reply to klm1213

Were you diagnosed quite recently? If so, your body could be constantly going from hypo to hyper and back.

klm1213
klm1213 in reply to Hidden

Yes, just last week. But I have been feeling this way for about a month.

Hidden
Hidden in reply to klm1213

Sorry, I saw you mentioned that in your original post... a month is nothing in this context; these things take time. Have you been prescribed any medication? Do you have labs you can post here for members to comment on?

klm1213
klm1213 in reply to Hidden

Yes, I'm on 50 mg of Levothyroxine. I have had hypothyroidism for about 2 years and just tested positive for the antibodies last week. I'll have to get the results from my doctor...she said they were all in the normal range but I know normal doesn't mean I will feel "normal."

Marz
Marz in reply to klm1213

Have you got those results so you can post them in your new thread. That would be helpful ... thank you.

greygoose
greygoose in reply to klm1213

You were doubtless hypo for a long time before your diagnosis. It doesn't happen over-night. :)

klm1213
klm1213 in reply to Hidden

Thank you so much for the info. Do you have any tips on dealing with the anxiety of all this? Right now I think that's the worst part for me

SeasideSusie
SeasideSusieAdministrator

klm1213 Fluctuating antibodies are part and parcel of Hashi's so you can experience hypo and what appear to be hyper symptoms as and when the antibodies attack.

You can help reduce the antibodies by adopting a strict gluten free diet which has helped many members here. Gluten contains gliadin which is a protein thought to trigger antibody attacks. Supplementing with selenium L-selenomethionine 200mcg daily can also help reduce antibodies.

Some information about Hashi's:

chriskresser.com/the-gluten...

hypothyroidmom.com/hashimot...

stopthethyroidmadness.com/h...

stopthethyroidmadness.com/h...

Look out for posts by SlowDragon as she has lots of information about Hashi's and how it can affect the gut and absorption and how to deal with it.

klm1213
klm1213 in reply to SeasideSusie

Thank you. Started taking selenium two days ago so hopefully that will help. Any tricks on dealing with the anxiety for all of this? Right now that is what is driving me crazy lol

SeasideSusie
SeasideSusieAdministrator in reply to klm1213

Sorry klm, I've not had that problem so can't help with that. Maybe start a new post asking how people deal with it, make sure the title mentions it to get the attention of those who can help.

Low nutrient levels are common with hypothyroidism because one effect of the condition is to reduce stomach acid, making it harder for the body to extract vitamins and minerals from food.

Low iron is very common, and it can also cause tachycardia (fast heart rate). If you interpret the fast heart rate as being caused by anxiety you may have things the wrong way round. The sequence is likely to be :

Fast heart rate leads to anxiety

rather than

Anxiety leads to fast heart rate

I ended up in hospital (just for a few hours) with a heart rate of 150 beats per minute. After being tested for various things I was discharged with a prescription for beta blockers. I was told to take one every day but found each pill lasted more than 24 hours, so now I just take one when I feel it is necessary.

I managed to reduce my need for the pills a lot when I got my iron levels up closer to optimal.

.

Another possibility is that your cortisol levels are not right for you. You could have high cortisol or low cortisol. Feeling jittery with palpitations would be a common symptom of both. The medical profession test cortisol in the first instance with a single blood test in the morning which tells them nothing about how much cortisol the patient has at other times of day. The best test, which is only available privately, is a saliva test.

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