More Light Bulb Moments Regarding SIBO

Do you have a pain that never goes away and have you ever had surgery or been in a car accident or had a baby or radiation?? If you have, you also have adhesions which is a repair mechanism for tissue damage BUT when it becomes too thick and attaches to the fascia you can be in for chronic pain.

Dr. Warn is in one of the interview segments in this fascinating series. If you have unexplainable pain that will not show up in any of the tests or xrays, you may have adhesions. Any abdominal surgery creates adhesions which if in certain areas can cause bowel obstructions and even blocked fallopian tubes which accidentally became UNblocked after manual therapy for adhesions and why this segment was included in the series. Doctors had to find out what was curing certain patients.

It turns out adhesions form after injury. It is made of collagen and will attach to the fascia and draws the body into wrong alignment. These will stay for life unless removed in other ways. An acute accident will create adhesions perhaps falling off the horse but even just riding the horse can cause adhesions which form and remain.

Fascia covers every organ in the body. It's like being in a strait jacket if you have adhesions but no x ray can find it. People with crohn's are very likely to have them. Dr. Warn and his wife are physical therapists and listen to patients but can locate adhesions manually. The ileocecal valve is usually removed during some bowel surgeries and that doesn't sound healthy. In car accidents often adhesions follow the seat belt areas. C-section surgery can form them which can then block fallopian rubes. The therapy should NOT be painful . This is a hugely ignored problem in medicine since they have no answers except to do more surgery and cause more adhesions. Adhesions are made up of type 2 collagen which is very strong. I think he said 200 lbs. per sq. inch. I think this is another reason to take proteolytic enzymes if you have seen my past posts. Not ALL adhesions cause pain; it depends on where they are located.

He did have SIBO patients who were helped but I think even if you don't have SIBO, it's likely you have adhesions but you probably have SIBO as well.

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  • Following an operation for removal of a kidney 7 years ago, I have had pain in that area. The doctors put it down to adhesions. I then had a scan, which showed "post operative matter". No one can tell me what this is, but they say it is not adhesions.

    I have jokingly asked if they have left a small nurse in there, who occasionally tries to fight her way out. They want to operate again to find out what it is, but after being on life support last time, I am never going to that hospital again.

    No one ever mentions adhesions when they talk about an operation, and I have always been told there is nothing they can do, so thank you for the interesting post.

  • Hi serenfach, I wonder what happens to the void when an organ is removed. I assume the body has some sort of reaction. At this time I think they should know what it might be. It does make me think that they might have left "something" behind. You read about this all the time. I don't blame you for not wanting more surgery but maybe the pain is actually coming from scar tissue. Hopefully more people will do what Dr. Wurn does. I think I misspelled his name earlier.

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