Ongoing Hypo symptoms but no diagnosis

I'm new here, so I apologize for this long post.

I'm presently in my early 30s. Over the last five years the weight gain is closer to 2 3/4 st despite the fact that I've always been active (working out 5-6 days a week). I've had workouts and diet assessed and both were considered good. I've also had a sleep study performed, which concluded that I was a perfect sleeper.

Six weeks ago I went away for the weekend and didn't exercise for 5 days, but still kept to my diet. I gained 4 kg in those five days. At first I thought it was all just water, but I've been unable to loose it.

In addition to the weight gain, my symptoms include, fatigue, memory loss, brain fog, constant headaches (I've had one for almost 8 weeks now), brittle nails, and irregular menstrual cycles for the past year (even though I had always been regular prior to this and pelvic ultrasounds/paps were clear).

I've broached the subject with my doctor for years, but since all my blood tests come back normal, he tells me that I shouldn't worry. At my last physical, when I brought the issue up again, he said that he thinks I'm just depressed. I told him I'm not depressed but I am frustrated about my situation. He said I should just trust his clinical judgment. I told him told hold off on the anti-depressants (as I really don't feel depressed).

My labs are always normal. However, my ft4 is right on the low marker, which makes me wonder if this is causing my issues. I went to a walk-in clinic with my labs for a second opinion, and the doctor also said everything was normal.

Is there anyone out there who has had similar issues/test results and been diagnosed as having hypothyroidism? If not, do you have any other suggested ideas on what my problem may be/what I should investigate?

Thanks for your help.

My most recent lab results are as follows:

TSH - 0.75 (lab scale 0.4 to 4.0)

FT4 - 9.1 (lab scale 9 to 23)

FT3 - 4.6 (lab scale 3.5 to 6.5)


- 122 (lab scale 120 - 160)

Vitamin B12

- 829 (labl scale 198 - 615) * NOTE: I get b12 shots once a month as prescribed by my GP, and received the shot right the day before the lab was done. Usually this number is with the range)

Ferritin - 31 (10 - 291) - *NOTE: I take iron supplements (feramax) - 1 on odd days, 2 on even days, as prescribed by my GP.

3 Replies

  • These symptoms could be related to food sensitivities, the most common being gluten. Well worth trying for example the Paleo Autoimmune diet to see if symptoms improve:

    My daughter's headaches, joint pain, back pain and water retention improved dramatically on this diet.

    Your ferritin is still low despite supplementation which (assuming you're eating iron rich foods) implies you are not absorbing it. Worth trying digestive enzymes to help digestion and absorption. These are really good ones:

    Biokult probiotics have also really helped my daughter's digestion:

    She has low cortisol, low in range levels of thyroid hormones and multiple symptoms but no diagnosis. She is still not 100% but the above protocol has made a big difference to her health.

    Good luck.

  • Since your TSH and Ft4 are both low and FT3 isn't stellar, it could be secondary hypo, meaning that your pituitary isn't working well. that could affect sex hormones too. Ask for an endo referral. However, your ferritin is also too low which might cause some of your other symptoms.

  • Normal thyroid blood tests do not always mean that there is not a thyroid problem. Basal temperature can give a better indication on thyroid function.

    To do a basal temperature test, it should be done as soon as you wake up and before you get out of bed. In women who are menstruating, their body temperature varies with the cycle; creating errors which can be avoided if the basal temperature is taken on days 2, 3, 4 and 5 of the cycle.

    It doesn't really matter which kind of thermometer you use when doing the basal temperature test, although it is important to be consistent in how you do it.

    1) Note the reading, and do it for several mornings so the results can be averaged out, since they may vary slightly day by day.

    2) If you have taken your temperature under the tongue, the normal temperature is 36.5ºC to 37.2ºC (97.7ºF to 99.0ºF)

    If your temperature is below 36.5ºC (97.7ºF), hypothyroidism/thyroid hormone resistance should be considered if symptoms are present.

    If your temperature is above 37.4ºC (99.2ºF), hyperthyroidism is possible if symptoms are present and if there is no other illness present to cause a fever.

    This test is a guide only as some temperature variations could be due to infection, virus, etc. This test should be used in conjunction with the signs and symptoms.

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