Hashimot's diagnosis but no treatment

Hi All, I'm so glad I found this site! I'm 37 and was recently diagnosed with Hashimoto's but my levels are so called "Normal" so my Encologist won't treat and my GP won't even talk to me about it. And I have ALL the symptoms. My test results are below, I'd love for anyone to take a look and tell me if they are right and I should just wait for them to get worse and deal or try to get a second opinion? Or beg my doctor to put me on medication. What is frustrating is that my levels are "normal" but they seem to me to be on the fence of being abnormal.

I also have one more question, if I'm trying to get pregnant do I need to tell my doctor I'm trying or wait until I am pregnant to tell them?

Thanks in advance for all your help and all the help you give everyone on this great site!

Thryroglobulin: range/3.0 - 40.0 ng/ml - me/18.5

Thryoglobulin Antibody: range/<4.0 IU/Ml - me/1.6

Thyroid Peroxidase Antibody: range/ <or = 20IU - me/88.5

Free T4: range/4.5 - 10.5 - me/5.5

T4, total : range 4.9 - 11.4 - me/6.1

T-uptake: range 0.9 - 1.3 TBI - me/1.1

TSH: range .3 - 4.7 mcIU/ML - me/3.8

9 Replies

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  • On the question of pregnancy I understand you have to be treated differently, I'm sure someone with experience will explain how, but I would tell your GP your plans. I wouldn't call your results right for you and I presume you are having symptoms. If he doesn't realise that pregnancy needs careful monitoring you need to find someone who does.

  • healthunlocked.com/search/c...

    These are some earlier posts - which I am hoping you will find helpful....

  • They need to treat if you're wanting to get pregnant as it's more likely you'll miscarry. I'm currently dealing with my fertility at a IVF clinic and they test people for TPO and treat as a matter of course after taking part in a scientific study a few years ago. Also treating Hashimoto's in the presence of antibodies can prevent further damage to your thyroid gland, look Isabella Wentz up.

    Good luck

  • Your antibodies is the one measurement ,if I have read it right,that is out of range.This suggests an auto immune disease ,possibly Hashimotos which would need treatment.

  • Many, many women with Hashi have normal pregnancies and healthy babies but you need to put a lot of things in place first. When I got my diagnosis I was in my mid 40s and I had been unable to conceive for the previous 20 years. Your Tsh needs to be below 2 and I would be doing all I could to bring down the anti bodies. 88.5 is not very high but it does indicate Hashi. Give up gluten. If you really mean business go on the Auto immune protocol diet. as some one else suggested buy Isabella Wentz's book. She has hashi and is a phamasist and it is a easy to read book full of info and how she put her hashi in remission. My anti bodies went from 800 + to 100.5 after giving up gluten. I don't have celiac but it made such a difference to me. Also get your ferritin, vit D and B12 tested if any of these are low in range your thyroid will be compromised. Don't waste time. If your doctor won't help you find one who will. Good luck and get going!

  • This document from Derbyshire NHS states that TSH should be under 2 pre-conception. Also have a look at the diagnosis chart. 'Normal' TSH and pos TPO warrants treatment. It would also be worth mentioning that a TSH over 3 in countries like Germany, Belgium and Sweden is seen as abnormal. I should think that if you mention trying to get pregnant, your Dr will have to listen!

    derbyhospitals.nhs.uk/easys...

  • Hi CG,

    1] As a Mum-to-be, you may find hypothyroidmom.com/ of interest/value ( - which I only found t'other day from this forum to look at pictures of thyroid tongue ! ! !), and

    2] if you "vit D" levels are low ( - as they are for many), raising them gently to at least above 50nmol/L MAY decrease your TSH ( - it seemed to have with me, but I'm not sure how widely this is acknowledged/recognised yet).

  • I suggest you look at the patient's booklet published by th BMA and written by Dr. Anthony Toft President of the British Thyroid Association. The title of the booklet is 'Family Doctor Guide to Thyroid Disorders' (ISBN 0-7513-0673-8) On Page 62, Toft states that the BMA recommended range for TSH is 0.15-3.5 mU/l. Your TSH is therefore too High. You probably have subclinical hypothyroidism. I suggest you ask for another TSH test and present yourself to the Lab as early in the morning as you can after fasting. This way you take advantage of the Circadian rhythm of the TSH (high around midnight and gradually descending to late afternoon) . This would probably boost your TSH up a bit above the Lab reference range. You could also buy a copy of the above BMA publication and show it to your foolish doctor.

  • Thanks so much everyone I told my doctor we were planning on getting pregnant soon and he put me on 50 mcg's. So we'll see!

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