No cure: I am at the stage now where I think... - IBS Network

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No cure

KWEls
KWEls

I am at the stage now where I think there is nothing that can be done, IBS seems very common and after reading all the posts I have come to the conclusion that we just have to live as best as we can with it as there is no cure, Many Doctor visits, Blood tests, cameras, ultrasounds, diets, tablets, herbal do nothing, only painkillers work for a limited time. I will soon be seeing a Gastroenterologist but hopes are not high.

I have stomach ache every day after lunchtimes and diarrhoea to varying degrees, scared to travel, scared to visit friends and when going out always planning where the toilets are.

Sorry to be so negative but it is reality.

55 Replies
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Hidden
Hidden

You are not being negative at all, it is what it is for you. So sorry that you suffer daily.

I am new here so forgive me if this has already been mentioned, but, have you given any thought to the possibility that you may have a gluten intolerance? The reason I ask is because this is my problem and I have many of the same symptoms that you have described in your post.

KWEls
KWEls in reply to Hidden

Hi Ella, Thanks for the reply, i have not been tested for any Gluten intolerance or anything else.

Hidden
Hidden in reply to KWEls

I have not been tested, either. My doctor and I have been treating my symptoms as IBS for a long time, no relief what-so-ever.

I took the initiative to do my own research and that led me to Gluten as a suspect. After talking to my doctor about it, he agreed that I should try to go gluten free and see what happens. I had nothing to lose.

Within one week of going gluten free I noticed a huge improvement. No looking back for me now. I still continue to research all I can find concerning gluten intolerance. It is an eye-opener for sure. So many digestive disorders end up being gluten related.

I am not at saying that this the case for all who suffer from IBS, I only wanted to put it out there in the event that you may want to investigate further.

KWEls
KWEls in reply to Hidden

Thank you, i will try and go gluten free, any recipe ideas!

Thehandyman
Thehandyman in reply to KWEls

You need to see what minerals, vitamins etc you will lose out on if you go gluten free and replace them, get advice from your doctor if need be.

Try lactose free, it worked wonders for me. Don't go lactose free and gluten free at the same time or you won't know which was the problem if it does help.

Regular exercise helps immensely.

My Ibs doesn't bother me anymore, so don't give up hope, you might yet work it out.

Hidden
Hidden in reply to Thehandyman

Yes, I agree with you, Thehandyman. Getting your doctor's advice is something that should be done. 👍

Hidden
Hidden in reply to KWEls

Recipes are not needed for me, lol! I am not a cook, at all. ☺️

I eat fresh and cooked veggies, salads, fruit, and some lean meats. For me, cutting out bread, pasta and cereal, etc. was how I got started. I try to stay away from all the store-bought, gluten free, processed foods. Some of these products are full of sugar, sodium and fat, so they are not a healthy alternative.

In other words I try to stick to a whole food foods, plant based regime with some added meats and eggs. So far I am satisfied and this has been going on for a few months and I haven't given up, yet.

The difference in how I feel is what keeps me focused.

Viklou
Viklou in reply to Hidden

I've tried most things too. I have an an appointment with a gastro on 9th July. After this I won't be going back, I feel even if they do another Colonoscopy, they won't find anything. I live with this most days. The sad part is although I work, I have nothing left when I get home at night. It takes any energy I have to do simple things. I spend most of the weekend recovering from the previous week. I have two horses that I feel I can't take through the winter. These will have to find new homes. Then that will be it for me. This illness will have taken virtually everything that was special. All because I can't physically do any more

Hidden
Hidden in reply to Viklou

I am so sorry to hear this, Viklou. Having to re-home your horses is just sad, I hope it doesn't have to be this way. Perhaps your appointment on the 9th will bring about something hopeful.

Viklou
Viklou in reply to Hidden

It's not fare to them or me. Today I so wanted to be ok. I just wanted to eat something daft so I had mini chedders, pringles and ginger cake. I can't remember the last time I had a normal bowel movement. So I thought what the hell. It hurts now and I'll be on the loo all night. There's only me who can define my choices and I needed to have a treat or three. Lol. I'm sick anyway and not been able to eat much but just fancied something nice.

Hidden
Hidden in reply to Viklou

Oh my, ginger cake sounds delicious. I understand you wanting to just go ahead and eat something, anything, that makes you feel normal. I do hope you won't have too much discomfort.

Now you have me fancy-ing ginger cake (with cream cheese icing) and pringles, or any salty snack for that matter.

Viklou
Viklou in reply to Hidden

I'm in a lot of discomfort but of my own doing. I just want my life back. At least if I'm sick it will take some pressure off

Catatvet05
Catatvet05 in reply to Viklou

It sounds to me that you have got a problem with dairy. Definitely go and get tested.

Tywiesz
Tywiesz in reply to Viklou

Hi,

trying to help and nothing personal, just look what you are eating: "mini chedders, pringles and ginger cake" is that good for ibs? I think even for non-ibs ppl it is not good at all. Diet needs to be as our body requires. I'm not telling it what that is, you be smart and figure it out,

cheers

Tywiesz

Viklou
Viklou in reply to Tywiesz

Lol yep you're so right. I just fancied it as I haven't had much of an appetite for weeks. I'll just stick to blending soups and a soft diet for the for a while longer.

Your statement "Just look at what you're eating" makes it look like I do this all the time. Which gives a false assumption of my lifestyle choices. All I'm saying and I don't mean to be personal is chose your wording carefully before writing!!!

Everyone is different.... for the last few years I've been constantly battling food choices.

As I am personally quite poorly at the minute having this type of food VERY OCCASIONALLY, doesn't make much difference overall in a Russian roulette, grand scheme of things.

Chedders, pringles and Ginger cake also provide added salts, sugars, some fats and Carbs. Granted a load of additives and preservatives but all in all to have a bit of what you fancy does you good mentally

marshamclean
marshamclean in reply to Viklou

I agree with you in the fact of “ruining your life” concept. I have given up everything and go nowhere. For 15 years I did pet rescue. No more. I am glad to be out of bed by noon. I suffer immensely every morning. I am gluten-free, lactose-free, garlic free, onion free, etc. I am always glad for relief by noon. I make dinner sometimes. Try and keep my house in respectable shape, walk my dog in the evening. Other than that it is tv and reading. I have decided this is my lifelong disease . I have a new medicine for me and my symptoms have enjoyed some relief. I am IBS C. I pray you can find relief.

Tywiesz
Tywiesz in reply to marshamclean

Hi,

please do tell:"a new medicine for me ..."

what that is?

cheers

tywiesz

marshamclean
marshamclean in reply to Tywiesz

Plecanitide under commercial name Trulance

Tywiesz
Tywiesz in reply to marshamclean

Hey,

that's so awesome that it's working for you. I was told IBS is due to too fast speed up movement of food through the gut and it's exactly what your meds do, speeding up , just wondering how come..

cheers

Tywiesz

marshamclean
marshamclean in reply to Tywiesz

IBS C is due to too slow movements! There is IBS D that might be too fast. Good luck, sweetie!

It is the reality I agree you just manage it plan ahead and never leave the house without Imodium Instants.

I have now cured myself. Please checkout some of my previous posts. It may help.

I agree you are not negative at all , this is life with ibs, I have just gone out of the worst flare I have ever had, made a stupid mistake and ate some cheese then to stop the pooing took immodium and got so blocked I had intense pain and had to lay on the sofa all day in extreme pain. Today pooed three time’s but dare I say feel empty for the first time in a long time !!! I have had to take paracetamol for the ache in my bowel from all the strain , not got the intense anal pain I gad over the last 48 hours so a better day I hope truly ..

I hope this helps , I have been taking Imodium every day for as long as I can remember and wonder now if I should not Any help from anyone on here be great.

Take care all xx

BlackCat16
BlackCat16 in reply to EJ59

Be careful taking Imodium long term..ive had two doctors tell me that it could be very dangerous. I’m in the US and have been on prescription Viberzi for ibsd for over a year. It works wonders and I have close to no symptoms.

Sorry to hear you've been struggling. Here is some information about IBS that I have shared with others in this group in case you weren't aware of some aspects:

IBS can be due to a number or combination of factors - these can be stress (including stress from early life experiences) which impacts the communication between the brain and the digestive system. There are lots of free webinars online at the moment regarding mindfulness meditation which might help. Plus you can ask to be referred for CBT or something similar to reduce your anxiety - I would have thought online appointments are available. Exercise can play a major role in IBS in terms of reducing stress, helping your gut microbiome and regulating bowel movements.

There is also not absorbing certain types of carbohydrates called FODMAPs very well, the residue ending up in the colon and bacteria feeding off them causing symptoms. Ordinarily feeding gut bacteria is a really good thing - when you feed good gut bacteria these produce by-products that have great health effects in the gut and throughout the body. However, in some people with IBS bad bugs might have the upper hand over good - these bad bugs may cause symptoms such as pain or disordered bowel movements. There is an interesting infographic on this here:

gutmicrobiotaforhealth.com/....

This is why it’s worth trying probiotics such as Alflorex (which has been scientifically studied for IBS) or Symprove to crowd out the bad bugs and make their numbers die down. If that doesn't work you can try the FODMAP elimination and reintroduction diet. This is normally under the guidance of a nutritionist via GP referral - this may not be possible at the moment so you can read about it online. If you download the Monash University FODMAP app it will tell you which foods contain FODMAPs and in what quantities. You can eliminate all FODMAPs for 2 weeks and then introduce each type of FODMAP one at a time starting in small quantities, increasing over a 3 day period and wait up to 4 days for symptoms. I go much slower than this - only introducing a small amount (1/4 to 1/3 of a normal portion size) of the same food for 3 days and then increase if tolerable or no symptoms and cut back to the previous amount if symptoms for longer and then try to increment again . I've read your microbiome can adapt to handling a new food if introduced very slowly and your bad bugs are under control with a good probiotic. Ideally you want to eat as many FODMAPs as you can since they are good for your health. Many people with IBS don't have diverse gut bacteria - it has been found that people who lack a diverse microbiome are more prone to diseases in general. In the long run, if you can get your symptoms under control, the ideal situation is to have a very varied diet - lots of different coloured fruits and vegetables, a variety of protein and carbohydrate sources including cereal fibres. This may seem a long way off, but with the right treatment all of this is possible. Last year all I could consume to control my IBS was white rice, protein and limited low fodmap veg. Using the approach above (particularly introducing Alflorex) I am now able to consume far more foods - more than I've ever dreamed of including wholewheat bread which is unheard of for me.

If you are also suffering from pain, you may be suffering from visceral hypersensitivity (functional abdominal pain) - there is info about it here:

iffgd.org/lower-gi-disorder...

It is where the brain interprets the normal activity of the bowel as pain - this is due to a wearing down of neurons in pain control centres of the brain which can be caused by PTSD, neglect or abuse in childhood, extreme stressful events etc. The first line treatment is nerve pain agents such as low dose amitriptyline. There is a theory that being on something like amitriptyline for 6-12 months can help the pain control centre neurons to regenerate. Note that amitriptyline can cause constipation, but this can be helpful in people who are diarrhea dominant. Unfortunately I couldn't tolerate these. Linaclotide (for IBS-C only) & Alflorex have helped me with this intestinal pain.

You may also find assistance with anti-spasmodic medication such as mebeverine (Colofac) or enteric coated peppermint.

You can find some info on self management here:

theibsnetwork.org/the-self-...

Wow, what an excellent reply. Some great and interesting info there. Thankyou !

I am trying to do without Gluten as I have ibs is it best to start slowly cutting it out for good then slowly introducing it and how long for a week would you see a difference ? Sorry for the rant fed up of not being regular bowel movements. Good advice and help on this subject .Hugs to you all

Hidden
Hidden in reply to Ringostarr72

I started out by eliminating the gluten containing foods that I ate the most often. This included bread, pasta, cereal and crackers. After one week (full 7 days) I noticed an improvement. No more bloating, gas or cramps, they just disappeared. This is when I knew I was on to something. I am now 3 solid months into it and not looking back.

The biggest hurdle I found, personally, was trying to find satisfying foods to replace the foods I eliminated. This takes some doing and being okay with sacrificing some of my lifelong favorite foods. Not having the IBS issues was a huge motivator.

What I didn't do was eliminate the gluten and then re-introduce it back into my diet in order to test my results. I had zero desire to do this, not after experiencing such relief. My thoughts were, if this works, why tempt fate?

Ringostarr72, I hope this helps, some. What works for one may not work for others. I think your idea about starting slow is a good one. Perhaps let your doctor know that you are going to give this a try.

Ringostarr72
Ringostarr72 in reply to Hidden

Thank you for your time and support x I will keep you posted and updated of course. Any ideas for regular bowel movements at all ? Or did this improve as well with this no gluten free diet

Hidden
Hidden in reply to Ringostarr72

Yes, regularity has improved 10 fold. Now this could be more from the lack of bulky, flour/grain foods, and not necessarily the gluten factor. More fruits and veggies and a big increase in water intake most likely play a big role in regularity.

I walk and do yoga/stretching, which both help to move food through the digestive track, especially the twisting stretches. This helps a lot.

I continue to research gluten and its effects on our bodies, mostly from a digestive point of view. What I have done is incorporate what I have learned and then go from there. By the seat of pants one might say.

My doctor is on board, although when you consider a doctor's appointment, if you can get one, and the 7 minutes allotted to said appointment, being on board is almost laughable. He is a great doctor, but health care is what it is, especially during these troubling times. We have to take our health into our hands, knowledge is power after all.

Yes please, do keep me updated.

Chances are if you’ve had blood tests done,you’ve been tested for gluten because you will have been tested for Celiac disease.

Like you ive been through the lot,over 13-14yrs and I’ve given up,and just try to live with it. Daily.😢

Hi I felt the same as you, I sort of wrote myself off and I’m only 44 but 3 weeks a ago I started following the Atkins diet not easy but now I’m very into it and it’s become secondary nature there are a lot of lovely meals you can have and desserts. My IBS has literally disappeared and to test this I reverted back for 24 hours few days ago and the pain came back after hour or so. I understand it’s probably a fluke and I’m lucky to have found a lifestyle that suits my gut but I recommend everyone give it a try I’ve also lost 10lbs in the 3 weeks. Result all round lol

I believe there is always a underlying cause to IBS, my constant diarrhoea I was told to just live with, turned out to be multiple food intolerances, controlled using the low fodmap diet and I have my life back.

Many reasons are

Bile acid malabsorption (normally after gallbladder removal),

Anxiety,

Food allergies and intolerances such as dairy, fructans, sugars.

Coeliac,

Sibo

Or more than one of the above, dont give up hope! Just explore every option until you find the cause :)

Hi I've just had the worst bout of IBS for years - it's lasted 15 weeks with lots of anxiety thrown in - had lots of tests & scans, all clear but still felt so poorly - was at the end of my tether but was advised to take a look at the NHS choices IBS info & they had a link to a FODMAP diet, so I've been following this diet plus not been eating wheat or lactose & have felt totally back to normal. Plus doing Yoga (u tube) has helped.

Hope you find something that works for you too.

Thank you everyone for all your comments ( its a complete minefield )

I've been there oh very badly also. I accepted that there's no cure and always thought it would be very bad, but everyone has to find their own solution to reduce symptoms. Which can take very long. For many it's diet, which does indeed help. But for me it was by far probiotics.

I really believe that for many people their gut microbiome is messed up, which affects our immune system, and other systems, etc.

What has helped me is, 50B probiotics daily, with psyllium husk capsules to help feed the probiotics. I've been through 3 different meds this year which hadn't really helped much, some made me worse. I had also tried diet and exercise but with no results and usually felt worse for hours afterwards. I also went through a lot the past 10 years with anxiety and panic. But last year was the worse for me.

My anxiety is pretty much nonexistent now, and my energy levels are still problematic at times but I'm gradually recovering of years being unwell. The gut and brain connection plays a huge role and the probiotics helped me tremendously and might do the same for you. It took a few weeks to finally notice a difference and a few more to really see a big difference. I saw a study that shows that approximately 80% of our seretonin is produced in the gut, so imagine all the other ones that might be the same.

I use Ultimate Flora Critical Care 50 Billion from Renew Life. They also have 30, 40 and 90 billion. Here's what strains you should try to get if you can't find it, since these helped me:

Bifidobacterium bifidum (HA-132) 25 Billion

Lactobacillus acidophilus (HA-122) 10 Billion

Lactobacillus casei (HA-108) 8.875 Billion

Bifidobacterium breve (HA-129) 4 Billion

Bifidobacterium longum (HA-135) 1 Billion

Lactobacillus rhamnosus (HA-111) 250 Million

Lactobacillus rhamnosus (HA- 114) 250 Million

Lactobacillus plantarum (HA-119) 250 Million

Lactobacillus fermentum (HA-179) 250 Million

Lactobacillus salivarius (HA-118) 125 Million

other companies have similar ones but I know this company worked well for my mom and I. Their capsule is a slow release so that more can reach the large intestine. Multiple strains are being studied because theoretically probiotics are supposed to help your immune system, anxiety and convert the food to vitamins more effectively. Hope you find a solution. God Bless.

Hi, i know how you feel 😜. The best thing I have done is try to follow fodmap, only eat fish no meat and avoid caffeine, drink ginger and lemon or peppermint tea. Difficult to eat out(!) but it's honestly worth it. Just gone back to work and only a couple of mishaps, homemade pizza with gluten flour and curry, but otherwise all good. Seems difficult to follow at first but can eat fairly normally, gluten free as much as possible, home cooking etc. It is worth a try, i have just stayed on it and have the odd mishap but generally know why now 😉

I have experienced exactly what you are describing, and it can last a month or 2, then, for some reason, I go back to semi normal for a few days - even a few weeks, then I go back to the worst.

I am no longer taking the pills the Dr prescribed, because they didn’t help. I think stress plays a big part in mine too. It is worse when I am stressed which is most of the time!

Responding negatively to Tywiesz's reply and writing "Chedders, pringles and Ginger cake also provide added salts, sugars, some fats and Carbs. Granted a load of additives and preservatives but all in all to have a bit of what you fancy does you good mentally" screams that you know what is causing your IBS but just refuse to acknowledge it.

You were unnecessarily harsh to Tywiesz so I'll be blunt in my reply. You don't have to read past this point if you're not ready to face the truth. The "softly-softly" approach on this forum keeps the majority of people here in poor health.

The fact that you buy those "food" items above and then try to justify eating them by breaking down the ingredients into what you think are essential and healthy; and then mention the additives coupled with "a bit of what you fancy does you good mentally" is classic denial syndrome.

IBS (and the vast majority of diseases) is caused by eating fake food. It really isn't rocket science or a minefield (yes, it does look like a minefield when someone writes a FODMAP post).

When you're shopping, and you're about to visit the fake food aisles, stop and play back in your mind the last time you ate something from those aisles and how it made you feel. You have a habit, that's all. Break the habit. Avoid those aisles.

Fake foods include:

All grains (bread, cereal, porridge, pasta, pizza base, cheddars, pop tarts, crispbreads) -- all dump sugar into the bloodstream, all ferment in the stomach and intestines causing distress, damage to the intestinal lining, bloating and messing up the gut bacteria. Oh, but they taste so nice...

Cake, biscuits, chocolate, sweets, crisps, Pringles, ice-cream, margarine, vegetable oils. Crap and more crap. Oh, but they taste so nice...

Follow a simple diet...

Eat meat, fat (animal, butter, coconut oil), vegetables and a little fruit if you have to (mainly berries). We don't need to consume carbohydrates. The small amount of carbs that the body needs can be made from protein and good fats.

Carbohydrate poisoning is a thing. We are fat-burning machines. We each have a super computer in our head. It uses a lot of energy. Fat provides that slow, steady release of energy without poisoning the brain's "circuits" (as long as the fat is not fake (margarine, vegetable oils, trans fats)). When we replace carbs with fat, we eat less.

If you need something sweet then look at Keto cakes and biscuits. Try ones with different sweeteners (Stevia, Erythritol, Xylitol, or a combination) and stick with those that you think taste ok (if not really nice) and your taste buds will adjust if you give them time to.

Time. Very important. If you're going to make the changes above then give your body time to adjust. Not a few days, or weeks, but months. You might feel worse initially and think it's not worth it but it will be.

Refined carbohydrates poison the body and brain. Alzheimer's, Parkinsons, MS, Dementia; they have different names because medical people like naming diseases, but they're all caused by poisoning of the body and brain over time. One example is the tremors/shakes that can develop, which is caused by a lack of dopamine which is caused by eating fake food (messed up gut bacteria) over many years.

Many people with poor health are praying for a miracle cure, tablet, lotion, potion for their particular condition, and continue to eat garbage because they think it makes them feel better mentally even though it doesn't make them feel better physically. Don't be one of them.

Try eating nothing but the following for 3 days: Spread Kerrygold butter on lettuce leaves (the butter can be left out of the fridge in a butter dish); add salt (rock, sea or Himalayan), and meat (and herbs, if you fancy), roll up and eat. Drink water. Repeat.

Will you do it? No. :)

Viklou
Viklou in reply to Lantyrn

To be honest and yes I am probably in denial and some confusion as to what exactly I can eat. One minute its low fodmap, next SCD, next keto, or even vegan. Everyone will have something different to in put into what makes them feel better, there isn't one scenario that suits all. Like I said in my statement to Tywiesz, it was assumed I buy cakes & biscuits all the time when I don't. For the last 3 years I've cut out most of the crap and very occasionally I will have a portion of what we shouldn't.

On that note Lantyrn I wish you the best of health and I thank you for your advice xxx

Lantyrn
Lantyrn in reply to Viklou

Oh, gawd, don't be vegan or vegetarian! :) Both nutritionally poor and stress the body out as it has to work so much harder to extract nutrients. [And to all the 'V' people who are 'V' to save animals, don't forget that animal habitats are destroyed so the land can be used to grow your (unhealthy) grains].

I understand the occasional treat but unfortunately you will most likely suffer. An example: I haven't eaten fruit for years; and last week I had a banana that went straight through me (lol) and "stomach" pains followed. My gut has been so used to processing meat and fat that it didn't have the enzymes available to handle the fructose. 12 hours later I was almost back to normal.

KWEls
KWEls in reply to Lantyrn

Agree with the animal habitats, im agaisnt all forms of Palm oil etc, if the truth be known there are too many people on this planet and needs to be controlled better and eventually reduce it by half to approx 4 billion ( humans are the problem )

Lantyrn
Lantyrn in reply to KWEls

Agreed. Unfortunately, it's not likely to happen, mainly due to religious groups who still believe that it's their duty to populate the Earth by breeding as much as possible. It's difficult not to wonder if virus outbreaks et al are the planet's attempt at reducing the population.

Viklou
Viklou in reply to Lantyrn

Lol I most definitely couldn't be vegan

KWEls
KWEls in reply to Lantyrn

Exactly

Ok, big lifestyle change for me now, just been shopping and buying gluten/meat free foods ( as much as possible).

Lets see how this goes, wish me well and thanks everyone for all your kind help

Hidden
Hidden

I wish you well, KWEL.

~ella

KWEls
KWEls in reply to Hidden

Thank you

You say you will be seeing a gastroenterologist. You have diarrhoea every day. Please ask the doctor if your symptoms could be Bile Acid Diarrhoea. All the exclusion diets in the world won't make a difference if you have that condition. Best wishes.

Will do thanks

Hello, so sorry to hear how you are feeling. I was feeling exactly the same due to IBS symptoms since 2013. The good news is, if you keep researching your symptoms, sometimes you can come up with a result.

My symptoms all started with the removal of my gall bladder (doctor initially diagnosed me with me IBS, until a year later, when my symptoms become worse, that an MRI indicated I had gall stones.) After gall bladder removed, I continued with symptoms. After numerous tests, a consultant referral and my own research, I finally after 7 years, have had a result.

I cut out ordinary bread and only eat gluten free bread. After trying numerous medications prescribed and not prescribed, my medication, on a daily basis, is 20mg Amitriptyline,

1 cimitidine tablet, twice a day (for stomach acid) and 1 colesevelam tablet, twice a day (for bile reflux malabsorption), I have no side effects with these medications, apart from a dry mouth with the Amitriptyline after I go to sleep so I always keep a glass of diluted blackcurrant juice on my bedside cabinet.

Obviously, your symptoms might differ from mine but there is a lot of research books on IBS D and IBS C which I found in the library. From these books, I was able to discuss with gastroenterologist and to ask on trying different medications. My doctor was never helpful on prescribing medication so it is better to ask a consultant.

Good luck on research and please don't give up, as I often nearly did. I now feel at long last, I might now be taking control of my life, rather than the IBS taking control of my life. Take care. Good luck

KWEls
KWEls in reply to Harley1020

Thank you

Hi KWEI, I have posted a number of times about the barrage of tests and things I've tired, but more lately I's feeling better as I too have tried to eliminate gluten (I am not coeliac). I think as Ella-anne describes, I may be gluten intolerant. I did the FODMAP diet under a dietician and saw some improvement but couldn't really pinpoint the foods that were having the most impact. However, after "lapsing" back into eating cake and the odd biscuit (due to baking in lockdown) I stated to have more symptoms. I've removed them again and gone gluten free and things have improved again- not prefect by any means, but improved. I think I may be on to something here. I also don't have lactose. I remain on pruclopride which helps with gut transit, linaclotide wasn't any good for me, as although it emptied the stomach, nothing moved after that.

Don't give up. I would say try not to try too many things at once, as its then very difficult to identify what is working. That was my experience anyway. I hope something works for you soon.

Hidden
Hidden

As I have mentioned in a previous post, I was being treated for IBS due to my many symptoms and nothing worked. It was due to my sheer frustration that I began to research Gluten Intolerance as a possible culprit.

I came across another article last evening and thought I would share a small excerpt here on the forum.....

If you've been diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome but haven't been tested for celiac disease, you should talk to your physician about ordering the celiac disease blood tests.

~If you have been tested but came up negative for celiac, you might want to consider a trial of the gluten-free diet anyway. Currently, there are no accepted medical tests to diagnose gluten sensitivity, so the only way to determine if you have it is to remove gluten from your diet and see if your symptoms clear up ~

I would like to say, once again, that I do not mean to imply that all cases of IBS are gluten related and I would not want to offend anyone here, what-so-ever. Always speak to your doctor first. I talked to my doctor before giving up gluten and he said that I had nothing to lose by trying it.

I tried posting a link to the complete article but it did not work for some reason.

One more small excerpt from the article.....

When you have irritable bowel syndrome or IBS, your digestive symptoms can run the gamut from diarrhea to constipation, and probably include bloating, gas and abdominal pain as well. If you're familiar with the symptoms of celiac disease and the symptoms of non-celiac gluten sensitivity, you'll know that the list probably looks really familiar. It's no surprise, therefore, that people have a tough time telling the three conditions apart.

In fact, multiple studies have shown that many cases of diagnosed irritable bowel syndrome are actually a celiac disease in disguise. In addition, some people who have been told they have IBS find relief when they eliminate gluten grains from their diets, even though they've tested negative for celiac disease.

For me, studying FODMAPs was a game-changer, identifying the intolerances causing my IBS-D and eliminating them from my diet. That has undoubtedly helped my situation which was becoming increasingly embarrassing and worrying when out. In addition, following suggestions on this forum, I recently started taking 1 x loperamide tablet a night, now reduced to 1 every other night. I'm delighted with the resultant normal BMs and although there is the occasional urgency, it is not as scary as in the past as I feel more in control. The proof of the pudding? I can't remember the last time I had to use Immodium Instants!

As others have said, it really is trial and error finding out what works for you - good luck!

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