Trying Again!

Hello

Today is the first day of my quit after a failed attempt in June - it only lasted for 10 days - no excuses, just my miserable lack of willpower.

I've been smoking for about 20 years, usually at least 12 a day but I know it is time I gave up for good. To help me this time I've got a supply of 2mg lozenges and also one of those e-cigs which I will use as a last resort.

What has really prompted me to try and give up smoking for good though is that I've noticed I'm starting to develope a smoker's cough which is especially worse first thing in the morning - I know this is all the proof I need that I must stop now.

Will continue to keep posting, and also reading all the tips and good advice on here, in the hope that I will stay motivated this time. I'm feeling really positive and focused this time but I know I'm going to need all the help I can get.

Evie

15 Replies

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  • Hello

    Today is the first day of my quit after a failed attempt in June - it only lasted for 10 days - no excuses, just my miserable lack of willpower.

    I've been smoking for about 20 years, usually at least 12 a day but I know it is time I gave up for good. To help me this time I've got a supply of 2mg lozenges and also one of those e-cigs which I will use as a last resort.

    What has really prompted me to try and give up smoking for good though is that I've noticed I'm starting to develope a smoker's cough which is especially worse first thing in the morning - I know this is all the proof I need that I must stop now.

    Will continue to keep posting, and also reading all the tips and good advice on here, in the hope that I will stay motivated this time. I'm feeling really positive and focused this time but I know I'm going to need all the help I can get.

    Evie

    Excellent decision Evie! The smokers cough is a reason for many a quitter to quit. Keep reading and reading and ask for any advice and support and this is the place that you will get it. You are focussed and motivated and that is vital in the early difficult stages. You can do this, if I can after smoking for 40 years anyone can.:)

  • Hi Evie and welcome back.

    One thing for sure the smoker cough will only get worse then you will start to notice the wheezing. Then instead of the snoreing waking you up in the night you will find its your chest wheezing thats waking you up. Not a pretty thought but thats the way it works.

    Stop now and you will feel so much better and so will your pocket.

    You will start to feel better within days, but always keep your reason for quitting in your head. The symptoms return very quickly.

    Sorry bit blunt but true.

    Keep positive and look forward to your posts over the coming months.

    H

  • Hi Evie,

    You've done the right thing. I am in month 2 cold turkey, 20 a day, 12 yrs

    The best tip I can offer you is research, this has helped me understand what my mind/body is going to go through. It some what helps me prepare and understand.

    Make yourself believe you dont need it!

    Goodluck!!!

    :)

  • Hey Evie

    after 16 days, while the mood has yet to level out, my breathing is so much better already, I feel more active now too as I feel less tired so quickly, so good luck, you know it makes sense ;)

  • Hello Mr Pants

    Just seen your first post. Welcome aboard and well done on month 2.

  • Hello Mr Pants

    Just seen your first post. Welcome aboard and well done on month 2.

    Cheers buddy, look forward to reading your much needed tips! :)

  • Well done Evie & welcome to the forum :) Everyone here is so friendly & kind & give great advice - if you're having a bad day post here & someone will be there for you & hopefully keep you from smoking :) Keep going, there are only positives when you quit but too many negatives to list to smoke...

    Denise x

  • Hello Again and THANKYOU to (Haze , Aitch, Mr Pants, Angry Bear and Denise for your replies and good advice.

    It's only my second day but I have already noticed that my cough is starting to ease a little - this is more than enough proof for me that I have to stop smoking now.

    So far, so good but I know from past experience that it it usually after day 3 that quitting starts to get harder for me. I've been trying to ask myself why I feel the NEED to smoke at all and, if I'm honest, I can't really think of any sensible or valid reasons.

    Just on my coffee break at work at the moment and am on here typing this update rather than sneaking off to the back of the building with the last few smokers who work here for a quick fag. I have decided that this time of the day will be a good opportunity for me to come on here for a chat and to help keep myself motivated.

    The only way is up;):)

    Evie

  • There isn't a better place to be on your coffee break :) I found it got harder after the third day as well. It does get easier because the bad days aren't so bad and the good days seem better than ever.

  • Thanks Una. I think it will help me if I try to keep posting every day, especially as I try to get the hang of this quit. Up to now I'm coping really well and haven't had to resort to the lozenges or e-cig I've got for extra back-up. I would like to try and do this using just my willpower alone but I know I might need help as goes on.

    The main thing is that I'm feeling really positive about quitting and I actually think I'm feeling better about myself for trying.

    The help and support of everyone on here is definitely giving a bit help so I'm glad I managed to find this forum.

    Evie

  • Just me again!

    I'm dashing back to work, hence the mistakes - coffee break over now!

    What I meant to say was that finding this forum and all the support from the other members is definitely a BIG help and incentive for me.

    Evie

  • Welcome Evie!

    You feel the 'need' to smoke because you've spent so long teaching your brain to respond to things by demanding a smoke. Therefore a situation crops up (doesn't have to be major trauma - even something simple like finishing a household chore, where you'd normally have 'rewarded' yourself) and your brain is prompted to go 'smokesmokesmokenowsmokeplease', which makes you feel like you're going fruit loops.

    Just take a breath, say 'no brain, I don't do that any more'. Take it one trigger, one hour, one day at a time. Keep making the right choice, and your brain will quickly learn to stop bugging you like that!

    You're doing such a great thing. Putting a line under it now, before that irritating cough becomes COPD, or worse. BELIEVE those who say it will get easier, because it will, I promise you. You CAN DO THIS!!!

    Helen x

  • Hello Helen

    Thankyou for the welcome and good advice.

    What you say makes so much sense and I wish I'd thought seriously about giving up smoking before I became so reliant on it. I say 'reliant on it' but of course smoking was just one of the life choices I made for myself - it's just a pity it's taken me so long to finallly realise what a stupid and destructive on it really was.

    It's never too late though so better late than never. I think I will do it this time and I really don't want to be a smoker anymore for so many reasons.

    Evie

  • You're not the only one. Took most of us at least a couple of decades to see the light!! Smokers go to some lengths to perpetuate their own self-delusion. The number of times I argued that I liked it, that it was part of my character, that it represented my youthful rebellious self, that I needed it as 'me time'... what an absolute load of steaming codswallop that was.

    Ah well. We live and learn!

    H

  • Totally agree. I'm kicking myself for not doing it years ago too. It hasn't really been too bad even though at times I've been a really depressed and that isn't like me. It's worth it :)

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