Has anyone who has neck pain tried a ... - Fibromyalgia Acti...

Fibromyalgia Action UK
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Has anyone who has neck pain tried a chyropractor? If so did u get good results?

Station19
Station19

Chyropractor

28 Replies
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Hi, whenever my neck plays up I head straight for the chiropractor and she sorts me out, I find it very good, everyone is different, so I’d give it a try

Station19
Station19
in reply to Mydexter

Got an appointment 5 30 today , so fingers crossed

Mydexter
Mydexter
in reply to Station19

Oh good luck , you were lucky to find one open in lockdown, hope it helps 👍

I have chiropractor treatment whenever I can afford it. Often takes several treatments before the neck manages to re-educate itself and stay where the chiro put it ;) Wouldn't be without my chiro or my hypnotherapist.

Hi yes I go to the chiropractor often. It helps me keep from drawing up and not being able to do anything. It's important for me to go.

Hazel_Angelstar
Hazel_AngelstarAdministrator

I have an excellent remedial massage therapist who I go to when my neck is troubling me XXX

When I trained as a therapist my tutor told us never to go to a chiropractor. In her opinion the problem is that a chiropractor moves bones by force but does nothing to keep them from moving back again; the more often the treatment the more the bone is likely to move again through the soft tissue.

With fascial techniques and positional release any injury should be rectified in one or two treatments only without using force. Having treated a client using Body Realignment (which is an amalgam of fascial work, positional release and orthobionics) who has an injury I would only need 1 treatment to resolve the problem; 2 max. I recall a client who had been visiting a chiropractor every month for over a year and was still in pain and hobbling around. I persuaded her to have a treatment with me (painless) and the following day her pain had gone and her problem resolved. As she had been in a bad condition for many years it did need a follow-up and some re-education as to correct shoes and not carrying a bag on a shoulder but that was it. I was horrified that she had been going back and back for a treatment which wasn’t working but damaging the soft tissue.

That is my opinion and I would never see a chiropractor for a problem; a physiotherapist or a colleague, yes.

Midori
Midori
in reply to penny

I know what you mean, but in Britain there are two types of chiropractor, the standard cruncher, and a more gentle, yet as effective method called McTimoney. I have been to both kinds during my life, and I would thoroughly recommend the McTimoney method. The one I used to go to also gave advice on exercises to help the muscles which needed reeducating.

I have recently moved, so I'm looking for a new McTimoney therapist.

Cheers, Midori

penny
penny
in reply to Midori

I visited a McTimoney chiropractor many years ago; he still used force. The problem with this type of treatment is that it has to be continued; with orthobionomy and suchlike the treatments fix the root problem and constant return treatments are not necessary.

Midori
Midori
in reply to penny

I'm surprised that you think a Mc Timoney used force. I find it much gentler than the regular Chiropractors; they really are bonecrackers!

Have you perhaps tried Osteopathy? They work by stretching rather than forceful manipulation.

Cheers, Midori

penny
penny
in reply to Midori

The McTimoney chiropractor I saw used glancing blows to move my pelvis and some force to move other bones, not painful and not a blow but certainly a hard shove. The modality I trained in uses no force whatsoever; the body does it’s own manoeuvre and the therapist just facilitates and guides. That is the big difference. Even with Bonework where we get bones to move into their correct position after trauma we do not use any force; there is no need. I have said this before on this site but should the client have any scars then these need to be treated with Scarwork before any other treatment as scar tissue is very strong, it is adhered fascia, and can distort the entire body, particularly if abdominal. I cannot recall the exact figure but fascia is 18x stronger than muscle. Fascia is around everything and is also thought to carry chemical messages throughout the body.

“Since there is one singular piece of this stretchy, mesh-like substance interweaving through muscles and organs from head to toe like shrink-wrap, distress in one area can affect movement and create symptoms elsewhere.”

Midori
Midori
in reply to penny

Understood. McTimoney does use glancing shoves to realign, but it is still less brutal than standard Chiropractic.

penny
penny
in reply to Midori

Absolutely agree but Body Realignment uses no force, it is all with the body not against it.

Mydexter
Mydexter
in reply to penny

I’ve tried most things , physio therapy didn’t do anything for me only make the pain worse, the only thing that helped was my chiropractor who is very gentle.

penny
penny
in reply to Mydexter

Have you tried Body Realignment or Orthobionomy?

Mydexter
Mydexter
in reply to penny

No , I’m very happy with the results I’ve got with my chiropractor.

penny
penny
in reply to Mydexter

That’s good but you said that you had tried ‘most things’ so wondered if you had tried Body Realignment.

HiddenThis reply has been deleted
penny
penny
in reply to Hidden

No, not at all; Emmet therapy is akin to Bowen. Body Realignment is an amalgam of Positional Realease, Ortho-bionomy and Fascial work. It is gentle but very effective. As stated, although a course of 6 treatments of about 1.5-2hrs each is recommended, I have found that clients will often just have one session and find that their pain has gone away after one treatment. I do recommend top-up sessions once every 6 months. Some people trained in Body Realignment are also trained in Scar and Bone Work; the former is taught by Jan Trewartha and the Scar Work founded by Sharon Wheeler in Seattle and now being taught to hospitals. Getting scars integrated is very important in any treatment protocol.

Midori
Midori
in reply to penny

That sounds very interesting.

Cheers, Midori

penny
penny
in reply to Midori

It is, Midori. I came to this late in life having been a case study for someone who was training in Body Realignment. It was so amazing that I decided to train in it myself. This involved obtaining a qualification in massage and physiology and then a year of training in Body Realignment. I followed this with an aromatherapy qualification (purely because we are not allowed to mix our own oils without it); Scar Work; Bone Work; Advanced Scar Work. I had never done anything like this before but found that I can feel and see pain in a client’s body and with Body Realignment remove that pain. Hearing from a client that they are pain-free for the first time in years after a treatment is a real high. I don’t do much Body Realignment (the Scar and Bone Work are integrated into any treatment) any more as I’m semi-retired and a 2hr treatment takes it out of me physically and emotionally.

I understand that a client of mine is featured in a new book about fascia and scars where Scar Work saved her toes from being amputated.

Midori
Midori
in reply to penny

Wow. I wish I was thirty years younger and could train in that now, but I've never heard of it in the UK.

I'm also no longer fit enough, although I have a Massage qualification, which I used to use with Disabled people to help loosen spasticity in limbs. But at 72, I can no longer manage bodywork.

Cheers, Midori

Mydexter
Mydexter
in reply to penny

No , actually I've never heard of it.

Myself I found an osteopath more useful. Had to try a few different ones, though, before finding a good one. And even then the relief is short lived, so can't afford it anymore. And the most help ever I have received from a sports therapist. He managed to open my tight, cramped muscles so nicely,too. But again, the pain does come back at some point. If I had more money, would go to sports therapist for sure. Hope you will find one that helps you! :-)

penny
penny
in reply to sherrisix

As my reply above, Body Realignment treatments fix the core problem and therefore repeat visits are not necessary. Because they are so effective at getting rid of the initial injury and treatment frequency is greatly reduced it costs less money in the long run. “...the pain does come back at some point...”. Not necessarily when treated properly. I would be asking why you have tight, cramped muscles; it may not be just physical.

However, “if you always do what you always did you’ll always get what you always got”.

So: do not cross legs; do not carry a shoulder bag except across the body and change shoulders; do not carry anything one-handed if it is heavy; wear sensible shoes, not flipflops or shoes which do not allow the foot to roll from heel to toe when walking without gripping with toes.

Saw an Osteopath once which was amazing she really helped with back and neck pain due to work. Would feel great 48 her later. If could afford it or was on NHS would definitely see one regularly. Think they have much longer training than Chiro so look at the whole system..

Chiropractor has been my number 1 source of pain relief for fibromyagia better than pills anyway if the week!

I ha e a back problem due to wear and rear- job related.

After trying osteopath s,physios etc,I found a sports Physio

Brilliant,she even sorted my sciatica out.i have to pay,but it’s worth it.

Have you tried acupuncture? I find that really good. But wary of chiropractic treatment - tried it but didn’t like my neck being jerked about! But that’s just me!