What is the ideal diet for blood sugar cont... - Diabetes India

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What is the ideal diet for blood sugar control?

Have you ever wondered why some diets work for some and not for others? Here is an interesting video presentation by Prof. Eran Segal giving results of his investigation on the subject.

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This is very interesting and helpful to keep in mind when trying new diets for blood sugars and also possible weight loss/gain. Thank you for sharing this with everyone, Praveen55.

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It is good, but it's still flawed. They measured blood glucose, and it's the insulin response that needs to be measured. The blood glucose responds to the insulin. Unless we measure the amount of insulin, we don't know how much the level of blood glucose is down to the individual variances such as size and genetics that he outlines, or how much is down to insulin resistance.

Why is this important? True prevention is about taking action to negate risks, not wait for detriment to occur then put a sticking plaster on it, which is what currently happens.

A patient goes to the doctor, and they have arthritis. The doctor uses joined up thinking, knowing there is an association with hyperinsulinaemia. He checks for metabolic syndrome, and the patient ticks enough of the boxes, however at this stage their blood glucose is perfectly normal.

Now, the doctor can measure the blood glucose responses to foods, formulate the algorithms, the patient goes away contented, but still develops diabetes. Why? Because there was no indication of the detriment to the hormones that the advice was causing. Only the blood glucose levels were measured, which didn't peak for anything at that early stage, because the hormone was managing to do it's primary job of keeping blood glucose within tight parameters. Unfortunately to achieve this it needed the higher and higher levels that result in visceral fat, fatty-liver, heart disease and so on There is an inherent danger with this individualising when focussing on the wrong markers. It's what has happened for tens of years already. We don't realise how important diet is because we've been focussing on the wrong markers, such as cholesterol, and because of only mediocre responses we come to believe that diet plays only a minor role, whereas in truth if we restrict the foods that actually lead to hyperinsulinaemia we can alleviate the vast majority of chronic ill-health, then concentrate on the exceptions insulinandmore.com/2018/01/...

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I fully agree with you Concerned, high blood sugar is not a disease but a symptom. Main issue is insulin resistance which precedes high blood sugar. (applicable to T2D)

Regarding the the experiment done by Segal's group, It is perhaps much easier to monitor blood sugar of participants on large scale compared to monitoring their insulin response.

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Excellent narration Concerned

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whenever, Fatty liver, Fatty Pancreas detection is done, Doctors should warn the patients about Future complications, which they don't know, or ignored, or not bothered at that point of time (i am saying, if any scan is done for some other issues, but found that Fatty liver exists -- which can be detected at very early stages -- so that a Warning alert is 1000% possible). Had that type alerts given by Doctors, then people would be conscious about it and can prevent DM-2, in the first place. This is all a vicious circle of events and half, full, Full and half.. etc etc. knowledge by Doctors. I am thinking there should not be a specialisation allowed to study by the Doctors, immediately after their Graduation, first they should practice with all earlier specialists for say 10 years, then only should be allowed to study Specialisation (if at that time they want to).

By doing so, they will be thorough with each subject in minimum depth, so that collateral thinking is possible and can diagnose and predict future problems/complications correctly based on any tests conducted on patients.

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I think we're always going to need specialists too, but you're definitely right that where there are strong associations, joined up thinking would save a lot of suffering.

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insulin resistence is only in case of diabetics who produce insulin naturally but body has no ability to obsorb in blood.This is true in respect of some diabetics probably newly diagnised.But in most cases of long standing diabetes who do not produce insulin on their own, measuring the blood sugar levels helps.

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Are you assuming that because blood glucose goes high the insulin produced is low rvmasalvad? The only way to confirm that would be to measure the insulin. Insulin resistance is worse when medication increases insulin levels, that's why medication has to be inevitably increased in a downward health spiral.

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How does one measure Insulin at home?

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Good point Fatbuddy. They obviously have the capability in the lab, that needs to be transferred to a constant monitor sensor as we have now for blood glucose. It;s whether there is enough will to drive this advancement

Don't underestimate inertia, and the motivation to keep the status quo. We still have national guidance telling people to eat rice, Weetabix, Shredded Wheat, wholemeal bread and potatoes because they provide sustained energy, when there has been evidence since the 1980s that they turn to glucose faster than table sugar in the body.

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Did not answer my question.

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I thought I had. I will simplify; I think technology needs to change to enable measuring insulin at home.

That said, I do recall Andreas Eenfeldt doing some insulin measurement experiments at home.

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At present, insulin can be measured in lab only, as far as I am aware.

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You count your carbs for each meal and take the dose of insulin afterwards so you know what the dose should be.

Example:

Eggs: 0

Yogurt: 18

Dose: 1( depends on blood sugar at breakfast).

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I am Type 2- DO not take insulin. I was asking about how to measure Insulin in blood at home ? Is there any devise available ? I am NOT aware of any.

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Not in a home setting, but it’s possible at a doctor’s office? Give them a call and ask them if they can give you the information.

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NO doctors don't have - they draw blood and send to lab

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Glycaemic Load (GL) is the most accurate estimation of the effect on blood glucose, and therefore how much insulin is needed = Glycaemic index (Gi) X amount of net carbohyrate (g) divided by 100. See phcuk.org/sugar

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Thank you for posting this illuminating TED talk. It looks like we have to do our own investigations with our diet and decide what is good for us. This would require testing our blood glucose after every meal and figure out for ourselves. This may be expensive for many because of the cost of the strips but perhaps, it is worth it. I have been experimenting myself in this direction in a limited way during the last four months but I have not yet been able to come to a conclusion.

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It depends on the type of blood glucose system you have to use. Some systems are cheaper than others.

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I use one-touch glucometer.

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I had used that for a few years, then I got the Breeze2 with discs of 10 strips each wheel.

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I have One Touch - and insurance paid 100 strips per month - free.

Now this yaer they charge $ 15 for 100 strips

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I will send a message to you soon. It’s okay!😀

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Check your private messages on HU. Just sent it now.

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In this connection, I would like to mention that I use an app called "Life in Control" developed by an Indian team. The advantage of this app is that it has many food items that we eat in India. But it still has to include many more items because Indian food is very diverse with a wide variety of culinary items. It helps us to log our details such as blood glucose, diet plan, medication, physical activity etc. This way we can keep track of the total carbs and the calories that we consume every day in an appropriate way if not exactly.This will help us in designing our own diet eventually to manage our diabetes.

I am just wondering whether others in this community are using this or any other app specifically suitable for Indian diet.

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Ideal Diet- There is NO such thing. Each person has different metabolism and different Insulin Resistance. Best is to determine how much carbs can a person tolerate - without sugar spikes - by trial and error. Try a meal with 30 or 40 grams net carb and measure blood sugar after one hour and two hours -- try for four or five different meals and decide which is better for you. Objective is to keep sugar spike under 140 % of pre meal reading.

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we are getting offtrack - from main question.

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Have anyone tried Abbott make Freestyle Libre, Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems consists of a small disposable sensor inserted into the skin, a transmitter connected to the sensor by a sensor mount wirelessly transmits results to a receiver and displays results. For those who can afford can consult your doctor. As i understand the sensor can monitor the glucose level for 14 days is available in most of the prime hospitals in India, since no pricking is required, the system is handy to try out different diets and dosage of medicine, i am bringing this in context of above discussions. My doctor recommended me to get it done to monitor the spikes and lows of sugar level, please post your comments.

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The Libre is now also in the USA.

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yes- but doctor will NOT prescribe me - because -my A1C is less than 7.0 - under control and Insurance will NOT pay for it -- I may buy one in India - for my experiment

on myself - and also to help others - if it works - I may buy 10 or more

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The sensor lasts for 14 days.

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That is good to know that it is available in India. How much does it cost?

Does it require a prescription from a Doctor? Thank you.

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What is its cost in India?

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Yes, from the website, it looks like launched in UK few years back and now available in many major countries.

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At present, It is quite expensive, Prajyo. Yes, I agree it would be quite convenient. However, the cost does not justify this device for general use.It is more useful for those whose blood sugar levels fluctuate quite widely putting them on HYPO risk in particular T1D.

Here in UK ,T1D on HYPO risks are prescribed this device.

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This presentation should be seen in proper perspective. The basic guiding principles for diets for diabetics remain same. As a reminder, carbohydrate whether simple or complex raises our blood sugar maximum followed by protein and the rise in blood sugar due to fat is minimal. Therefore, it makes sense to have a diet which is low in carb, moderate in protein and rest healthy fat. Because of the individual conditions, every person will respond differently on the same amount of carb consumption. Through self monitoring, we should find the optimum amount of carb that can be taken keeping bs in the target range.

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If you do Google for Dr BRJ Kannan, you will find a lot of video clips, there is a grain of truth. I came in to the video clips by accident.

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