Log in
Couch to 5K
65,194 members β€’ 98,496 posts

C25K graduate--but I'm so slow!

I graduated C25k two months ago, which felt amazing! Since then, I've developed my own training plan to keep my momentum going. I run every other day. The weekend run is an ever-increasing distance run (last week was 60 minutes); one run is a "speed run," where I repeat a C25k run at a faster pace; and the one or two remaining runs are 5ks.

I can run for an hour without stopping, which is an amazing thing I never thought could happen! But my pace is so slow. At this point, my best 5k is in 40 minutes. My husband started the program after I finished and, despite the fact that he's never run before, ran more than 5k on his 30-minute graduation run. I can't seem to get faster, and it's very frustrating. I know the conventional wisdom is "slow and steady," but at what point is "slow" too slow?

19 Replies
oldest β€’ newest

Hey 8 mins a km in my book isn't slow at all. Speaking as a 10 minuter - maybe our mentors have some helpful ideas. Have you tried some HIIT running? Trying for short bursts of speed may help here. And don't please compare what you do to your husband, you are you . Different physique, start point and mentality. Some of us are Usains others steam trains. But you are a fab runner just re-read your post, and see what amazing distances and times you are doing

7 likes
Reply

You can't compare yourself to your husband as men do tend to be able to run faster than women hence different world record speeds....I think it is fantastic that you can run for 60 minutes as this is something I am trying to gradually build up to do.

8 likes
Reply

Never, in my opinion. We all have different capabilities and we all progress at different speeds when it comes to pace. I actually don't ever think I will be a 5km 30min person but I'm ok with that. You are doing everything perfectly with regards to your training plan so over time I'm sure you will increases your speed but it will be done at your own pace which is the perfect way for that to happen, it means your body will be comfortable and you will be less likely to acquire an injury. One of the most valuable lessons I have learnt from running is not to pit myself against others or be too competitive, all that leads me to is self doubt and that really does effect my running. Trust me you are doing brilliantly, happy running.

11 likes
Reply

Going out for a slow jog for an hour is my idea of heaven! You burn lots of calories, get to see the sights, get fit! Sounds ideal πŸ™‚πŸ’ͺπŸƒβ€β™€οΈβœ”οΈπŸ‘

Speed comes with strength. Stronger legs have to be built and it takes many months. Slow running is the tool to build those running legs.

You can add in some other exercise as well on non run days. Cycling, swimming, walking of course, dance, home or,gym based strength exercise πŸ™‚πŸ’ͺ

16 likes
Reply

So right, MissW! as ever..:)

3 likes
Reply

Never.. slow is good.. as you have seen from the replies :) Really good as far as I am concerned :)

This is your journey, your body, your mind, and your spirit. Dig deep, own it and start doing it for you and by you."

8 likes
Reply

As a new runner you're not slow! And doing great! Just keep on with what you're doing, it'll come naturally, if not doing so already, then incorporating the odd hill will help, so don't worry about your pace, just enjoy your run and keep smiling!😊

7 likes
Reply

I don't know for sure but I imagine your hubby is taller than you?

Thinking about the simple geometry of the thing, I take three paces to my husband's two. So I am actually walking / running faster than him (as in moving my legs more quickly) but cos I am a good eight inches shorter than him, I cover way less distance. Nothing I can do to change that! And you may find the same. I wonder if you did a step count you would find you're taking more paces?

4 likes
Reply

Oh, and i think you're doing fabulously btw! I cannot imagine running for an hour yet (but maybe i will one day: #lifegoals).

3 likes
Reply

You can run for an hour?! I am pretty sure I will at some point manage 5k in 30 minutes but I can't imagine ever keeping going for an hour. That's amazing and something to celebrate.

7 likes
Reply

You will.. you will be amazed, what you will go on to achieve...... a long slow run ( Sunday is my long run day) is absolutely brilliant...:)

2 likes
Reply

Have you tried the C25k plus podcasts? The speed session on that is fab as its intervals which is the way to go. Dont feel bad about your speed, the main thing is to keep running and keep enjoying. I will never forget when my husband decided to do a parkrun with me and my son. As he doesnt run ( but does ride to work everyday) I thought I would 'beat' him and demonstrate my achievements. However he very quickly belted off to catch up with my son and came in at 26 minutes to my 29. To say i was gutted was an understatement. It took me a while to accept that actually running is MY thing and just because I'm not fast it doesnt make me bad at it.... Sorry I have waffled but I just want you to see that it really isnt about speed, but it IS about personal goals...

10 likes
Reply

Also what you can do as a 'one-off' effort is very different to the mental discipline of running steadily and consistently over time. As all the others say, it's your body, your running.

2 likes
Reply

Oh I remember years ago MrRfc coming out with me for a run, he left me for a huffing puffin wreck trying to keep up. I was gutted too, but he eventually reminded me he would never attempt a Triathlon or HM so I was still a winner. πŸ˜€.

1 like
Reply

Thanks for all the replies, everyone! It's only disheartening when I compare myself to others. My hour run this weekend felt amazing, and I should celebrate that accomplishment rather than beating myself up that it wasn't faster. I never thought I'd be able to do that in the first place! I'll trust that speed will come with time (and more interval training)...

4 likes
Reply

This forum is so good at keeping us motivated as I've had exactly the same thoughts as you about my speed wondering if this is it...40 min 5k's. It's so easy to forget where we came from...struggling even to run a few minutes, well done on your long run...right now I can't imagine getting beyond 5k...in my final 1k I'm still torn between keeping enough stamina to finish and breaking through my 40 minute barrier.

I completed the programme mid July with my 21 year old step daughter and had to quickly realise that with her extra 6 inches of height and 38 year age advantage I was never going to keep up πŸ˜€

5 likes
Reply

You're doing just fine!! I had to smile at these replies because I too have a husband who took up running again after I did C25K & who 'popped along to parkrun for support' only to steam off & do a 25min 5K. (He did come back to encourage me on the last km though! I do about 35mins). We do sometimes run together & I have to remind myself that his fitness, physique & history are totally different to me. For a 46 yr old with a great ability to be lazy, knees & feet that turn inwards & asthma, I'm doing ok! Be slow, enjoy your runs - you're in good company here!!

2 likes
Reply

That is hilarious we are so similar.... I am also 46 and asthmatic... !!!! :)

3 likes
Reply

This is just an idea as I am only in week 7 and no expert!

For me, after graduation I don't particularly feel the need to build up to running further but I do want to run faster. So what I'm going to do is go back to week one and start again, but instead of jogging gently along as a raw recruit to the world of running does, I'm hoping to be able to up the speed considerably for those one minute sessions, and maybe, depending how it feels, instead of walking in the breaks I'll jog. If that feels like it's working I will then go through the 9 weeks again but with the faster pace.

Would be interested in opinions on this plan and whether it works that way?

:-)

1 like
Reply

You may also like...