Cpap, copd?: cpap, copd. My Dr prescribed cpap... - COPD Friends

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Cpap, copd?

xx11xx
xx11xx
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cpap, copd.

My Dr prescribed cpap, even though I am low risk. After 8 days I could no longer expand my lungs to breathe, oxygen dropped from 98 to 94, 2 days woke up with headache, became lethargic, didn't care if my hair was combed etc. I quit using it after 8 days. That was 3 weeks ago, still have a hard time breathing. At this point I fully believe that thing ruined my lungs. (I am a tad better, but not at all back to normal). The company of the machine says the settings need to be adjusted, really? I am scared to death to try again even if they do adjust it. I will say it did help me sleep through the night. Thank you Chris

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Jensmom

Hi! I'm sorry you had to go through that. My experience was the same and idc what Dr says. It ended me up in the hospital

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xx11xx
xx11xx
in reply to Jensmom

Me too, couldn't expand my lungs to breathe! What a mess, I am still not feeling good because of that machine.

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xx11xx
xx11xx
in reply to Jensmom

Did you go back on it? I'm not sure what to do, I think I will send it back, scared to death of it. It did so much damage, taking so long to get over.

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KatherineK

I have moderate sleep apnea. I also have emphysema (copd), and I have lost both upper lung lobes to lung cancer. I was diagnosed with sleep apnea about 6 months after my first LC surgery. My breathing gets very shallow and my oxygen level plummets. I started using a cpap machine, but I insisted they set it on auto (it would automatically adjust to my breathing and the incoming air pressure would drop down when I exhaled). It did help me sleep better, and I didn't snore, so hubby was happy. I used it until after my second LC surgery, I started having a hard time exhaling against the incoming air so I stopped using it. Now I am just using supplemental oxygen overnight, I hate it and I kinda miss my cpap.

You should know however, that it takes time to get used to sleeping with the cpap machine. If you do decide to give it another try, insist they set it to automatically adjust to your breathing. That should make it much better for you and much easier on your lungs.

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xx11xx
xx11xx
in reply to KatherineK

Thank you, I didn't know I could tell them to adjust it to my breathing

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KatherineK
KatherineK
in reply to xx11xx

Yes, you can ask (insist) they set the cpap to auto. It will have a high and low setting, but will automatically adjust to your breathing.

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xx11xx
xx11xx
in reply to KatherineK

thank you again, yes I miss it, it did help me sleep. Went to dr. today, sending me to another dr. that is well versed in cpaps

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KatherineK
KatherineK
in reply to xx11xx

Let me know how you make out.

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xx11xx
xx11xx
in reply to KatherineK

Thank you Katherine. You have been so much help. I am waiting for them to schedule me an appt.

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xx11xx
xx11xx
in reply to KatherineK

Went to the Dr. today. He is going to try bipap, (sp?) He is much more informed, glad I went to see him. Thank you

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KatherineK
KatherineK
in reply to xx11xx

Glad to hear it. Keep in touch, let me know how you are doing.

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xx11xx
xx11xx
in reply to KatherineK

Thank you

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Jocopd

First off cpap machines are usually prescribed after a sleep test has been done and during that sleep test it was found the person STOPPED breathing for X amount of times during X amount of minutes. What the cpap machine does it it takes over and pushes air into your lungs so you don't die while your sleeping although most people would wake up before that. And since it is pushing air into your lungs you will sleep better, more rested and stop snoring. Your lung muscles may get sore since they have not expanded that much while sleeping in the past.

Oxygen machines provide you an increase in oxygen if your lungs can no longer do it for you.

The two usually are not related but can be used together. There is a difference in "air" and "oxygen".

Waking up with a headache, being lethargic, having depression etc can be signs of lack of oxygen.

The cpap machine would not cause those symptoms but it may need to be put on a higher level - which would be the adjustment they are talking about.

Do you have copd? At 98% I doubt it unless that is the reading on your oxygen, but I would think if you do then you have been prescribed oxygen at night.

You should be using your night oxygen with the cpap not instead of the cpap. If your not using your oxygen at night then that would be another reason your have those symptoms.

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xx11xx
xx11xx
in reply to Jocopd

I had a sleep test, quit breathing 13 times. I have 4th stage copd, I am on oxygen 24 hours a day.

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Jocopd
Jocopd
in reply to xx11xx

Ok are you using the cpap WITH the oxygen when you sleep? If not that is why your getting headaches etc.

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xx11xx
xx11xx
in reply to Jocopd

yes, on oxygen 24/7

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Jocopd
Jocopd
in reply to xx11xx

What I am trying to find out is if you have hooked your oxygen machine up with your cpap machine at night.

In other words did someone or have you hooked up the adapter (with or without an additional one-way valve) to connect the oxygen supply line with the tubing used by your CPAP device, or even your mask may have a special adapter built into its design?

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xx11xx
xx11xx
in reply to Jocopd

Yes it is hooked up to cpap

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Fleurbaby

That is almost exactly how things work out for me as well! I haven't been able to use my cpap for a while now, mainly because I have forgotten that it's there. But, I can't use it!

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RedSox

I wish to add my two cents to this discussion if I may. I read many replies on this forum and I find many mis conceptions in regards to CPAP . Some folks even stop the treatment because it’s uncomfortable or it’s not working etc etc . First of all CPAP should not be stopped because it’s uncomfortable. There are many other options of masks etc to make one comfortable . It like any thing in life , it takes getting used to. It is an absolute awesome treatment and 99% effective in combating sleep apnea. The most important thing is sleep apnea is not only relegated to folks with lung diseases. Many super healthy athletes use CPAP as well as normal healthy people as sleep apnea is not for folks with lung disease. CPAP can also be for people who are overweight. Even though obesity can make an healthy person find it difficult to breathe it has always puzzled me how it isn’t formula factor in diagnosis of COPD ( that’s another discussion for another day) . The point I’m making is Sleep Apnea and ANI is serious condition and there is treatment for it and it in no way can make things worse for your lung muscles or any other theories I’ve read on here. Sleep Apnea should not be taken lightly. A few questions by a nurse or doctor does NOT prove or disprove Sleep Apnea you need a sleep study to confirm it just as in my opinion you need a CT Scan to prove COPD emphysema etc . I’m sorry to offend some folks but it is standard here in USA that a Pulmonary Function Test as well as Spirometry does not confirm a true diagnosis just like a nurse or doctors saying you don’t have sleep apnea because of a few questions you answered mean you do not have SA

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