Platelets

Platelets

I posted recently about my platelets dropping to 127 - anyway after 2 lots of Antibiotics and the cough is finally subsiding, my GP sent me for a Blood test.

These were the results 3 weeks ago

Wbc 74 lymp 68.4 Haemoglobin 15.4 Platelets 127

Today they are

Wbc 116.9 Lymp 110.3 Haemoglobin 17.1 platelets 324.

When I was in the grips of it my Wbc was 74 the same as it was 6 months ago so now it is the highest it has been.

Pleased to see the platelets back up but what I can't understand is while I had this infection the Wbc was 74 now that it has passed it's 116.9

Jules Flying for us all

Apicture from the aviva women tour coming through Daventry 2016, it has just been announced that Daventry will hold the Grand depart on the 7th of June for the 2017 race

Sorry Chris and Neil about the dodgy focusing

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5 Replies

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  • Maybe there was a lag in gearing up the WBC to fight the infection, so 3 weeks ago your body was still not fighting properly. Now you how WBCs coursing en mass through your body, infections has finally been given the boot....and it will take time, now the WBCs have their qualification at black belt level and are eager to work, for levels to drop again?

  • Great answer I completely understand - thank you

    Jules the flyer

  • I will try to answer, not that I am an expert of any kind; I am just an avid reader of immunology textbooks after getting diagnosed. In an infection, the first WBC to arrive on the scene are the neutrophils. These are part of the innate immune system. They live about 8 hours once in circulation. There is a supply of them marginating all the time on the walls of the blood vessels, on the ready. (Exercise, for example, will shake them loose.) The neutrophils engulf the bacteria, a process which then leads (via a bunch of steps that I will skip here) to activation of the lymphocytes to do something about the infection. The B-cells—one of the three types of lymphocytes, which are part of the humoral immune system, not the innate one—then start making antibodies against the bacteria (or virus). This takes a little time, about 5 days, before the antibody production is at its peak.

    You can read about the life of neutrophils here:

    nature.com/nri/journal/v13/...

    Anyway, I think you should wait and see what your next blood count looks like. The lymphocytosis you are seeing now may be a reactive one and not due to something more sinister, like an upswing in the CLL.

  • That makes a lot of sense, I collected the print off from the Drs this morning as I only knew about the four mentioned figures

    I see that my Monocyte count is above range at 1.70 usual range 0.21 to 0.92

    basophil count of 0.15 usual range 0.0 to 0.13 so I guess the infection hasn't quite gone yet or unless they mean anything else ?

    Jules the flyer

  • These can go up for many reasons, but the most common reason would be an infection.

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